Posted By:Dan Devaney
Email:
Subject:Re: John Lard of South Carolina, St. Louis & Illinois & Family
Post Date:August 16, 2007 at 22:00:11
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/lard/messages/135.html
Forum:Lard Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/lard/

Thought we would put in our two cents worth:

We are not reg on this board so please contact direct at
Genealogy4999@aol.com

We have the Todd side of the family and also a question. Is the following family group connected somehow to your families?

Name:       Hezekiah LARD, 9314
--------------------------------------------------
Birth:       abt 1772
Death:       bef 9 Nov 1799       Bellefontaine, St. Louis Co., Missouri
Occupation:       abt 1797 built grist & sawmill
Marriage:       3 Jan 1793       Nelson Co., Kentucky
--------------------------------------------------
Spouse:       Catherine Sullivan PURCELL, 9312
--------------------------------------------------
Birth:       abt 1772       Frederick or Washington Co., Maryland
Death:       bef 1850       Bellefontaine, St. Louis Co., Missouri
Father:       Thomas PURCELL, 885 (~1750-~1808)
Mother:       Elenor SULLIVAN, 886 (~1750-)
Other spouses:       Morris JAMES, 9311
--------------------------------------------------

Children
--------------------------------------------------
1 F:       Rosannah LARD, 9313
Birth:       1792
Spouse:       Henry T. NASH, 36842
--------------------------------------------------
2 M:       Joseph LARD, 21489
Birth:       1793
--------------------------------------------------
3 M:       Isaac LARD, 36829
Birth:       1794
Death:       bef 1850       Ralls Co., Missouri
--------------------------------------------------
4 F:       Lucy LARD, 28126
Birth:       1796
Spouse:       Aaron GEARNSEY OR GUERNSEY, 28127
--------------------------------------------------
5 M:       John LARD, 36840
Birth:       1797
--------------------------------------------------
6 M:       Fielding LARD, 36841
Birth:       1799
Spouse:       Nancy SULLIVAN, 36844


Notes for Hezekiah LARD
SOURCE-MARRIAGE:
<Ancestry.com>
Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850

Lard, Hezekiah
Pursley, Caty
03 Jan 1793
Kentucky
Nelson County

SOURCE-BACKGROUND-SPOUSE-LAND GRANT-APPROXIMATE DEATH YEAR:
DOC-PAT-019: Unknown book: Chapter X; pp 109-110.
“Chapter X
Cold Water District
Spanish Lake - Musick’s Ferry - Jamestown - Columbia - Bellefontaine”:
“The freedom that the inhabitants of Florissant enjoyed for hunting and foraging beyond the limits of their village and Common Fields, came to an end during the period 1796-1800, when under the encouragement of the government, Americans in great numbers crossed the Mississippi to take up land in St. Louis County.

Hezekiah Lard was among the first group of Americans to settle on Cold Water Creek. His grant for 1000 arpens from Governor Trudeau in 1797, lay along the Missouri, through which flowed the Creek. With financial aid from the Governor, Lard began immediately to build a grist and saw mill on the east side of the creek. Later, the “Factory” and Fort Bellefontaine were built on this grant. (pages 24, 25, & 26)

In April 1803, a public sale was held from the estate of Hezekiah Lard, deceased. By that time, his widow, Catherine Sullivan Purcell, had married again to Morris James. The officials at the sale were James Mackay, Commandant of St. Andre, and James Richardson, syndic of Marais des Liards. A list of those attending the sale identified other Americans who settled in the area, a few came from Marais des Liards:
Robert Nash - Jeremiah Browner - William Massey
Ira Nash - Richard Chitwood - William Bodche (Burch?)
Sarah Nash - Seth Chitwood - Morris James
Vincent Carrico - John Brown - William Musick
Denis Carrico - David Brown - John Graham
William Patterson - Therese Brown - Robert Young
John Patterson - William Davis

Among the French from St. Ferdinand who attended the sale, represented by Louis and Antoine Dubreuil, who acted as interpreters were:
Louis Dubreuil - Manuel Andre Roque - Charles Dejarlais
Baptiste Creely - Andre Pelletier - Hyacinthe Dehetre
Antoine Deharlais - Joseph Presse

Others who settled in the Cold Water area were:
Gabriel Lard - Guy Seele - Samuel Hodges
Cumberland James - Farquar McKenzie - Daniel Hodges
Benjamin James - Isabelle Chitwood - William Robertson
James James - John Nathaniel Seeley - Gilbert Hodges
Sarah James - Samuel Duncan - Aaron Quick
James B. Hart - Lydia Quick - Edmond Hodges
Elisha Harrington - William Rogers

The concession for land to John Brown dated November 16, 1798, for 600 arpens, was described as on the “Rousseau de Florissant” (U.S. Survey 104). The concession to John Patterson dated the same, describes his 600 arpens as being on “French Town Creek” (U.S. Survey 105).

In 1802, William Davis built a distillery on a tract of land on the Missouri where he lived until 1808. He evidently became indebted to Samuel and Daniel Hodges, who were granted the land. (U.S. Survey 2027)

About a mile or so above the mill of Hezekiah Lard, Elias Harrington built a flouring mill on Cold Water Creek before 1803. His land (U.S. Survey 1012) was located at the place known to the French as the “Glaze aux Biches”. Harrington was a millwright and built several mills in the county. He came to the Cold Water District from his land in the Common Fields of St. Ferdinand with his wife and three children. In 1807, he sold the flouring mill along with the residence he had built to James Hart.

U.S. Survey 3023 was settled by Benjamin F. James. On December 10, 1805, James Mackay testified that he had given permission of James to settle on the land when he was Commandant of St. Andre. February 21, 1806, Edmond Hodges testified that “James put up a cabin in 1803, and in 1804 kept school and has been inhabiting the land to this day.” On June 18, 1834, when this land was claimed by the heirs of Benjamin Franklin James, Catherine S. James (wife or widow of Morris James) swore that she was in her 65th year; that in 1804 she saw a small field of corn growing and said James lived on his place until his death, which occurred in 1815. At the time of his death, he had several cabins and an orchard of apple and peach trees, and that he occasionally taught school in the neighborhood. This tract of land was on the south side of Sinks Road near its intersection with Old Jamestown Road or Accomadation Road.”

SOURCE-FROM PROBATE RECORDS FOR EZEKIAH LARD:
St. Louis Probate Court Digitization Project: 1802 - 1900
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/stlprobate/Default.asp
Case Number 00086 Date Filed 1809 Microfilm Reel C27452


Notes for Catherine Sullivan PURCELL
SOURCE-MARRIAGE:
<Ancestry.com>
Kentucky Marriages, 1802-1850

Lard, Hezekiah
Pursley, Caty
03 Jan 1793
Kentucky
Nelson County

SOURCE-BACKGROUND-SPOUSES-AGE:
DOC-PAT-019: Unknown book: Chapter X; pp 109-110.
“Chapter X
Cold Water District
Spanish Lake - Musick’s Ferry - Jamestown - Columbia - Bellefontaine”:
“The freedom that the inhabitants of Florissant enjoyed for hunting and foraging beyond the limits of their village and Common Fields, came to an end during the period 1796-1800, when under the encouragement of the government, Americans in great numbers crossed the Mississippi to take up land in St. Louis County.

Hezekiah Lard was among the first group of Americans to settle on Cold Water Creek. His grant for 1000 arpens from Governor Trudeau in 1797, lay along the Missouri, through which flowed the Creek. With financial aid from the Governor, Lard began immediately to build a grist and saw mill on the east side of the creek. Later, the “Factory” and Fort Bellefontaine were built on this grant. (pages 24, 25, & 26)

In April 1803, a public sale was held from the estate of Hezekiah Lard, deceased. By that time, his widow, Catherine Sullivan Purcell, had married again to Morris James. The officials at the sale were James Mackay, Commandant of St. Andre, and James Richardson, syndic of Marais des Liards. A list of those attending the sale identified other Americans who settled in the area, a few came from Marais des Liards:
Robert Nash - Jeremiah Browner - William Massey
Ira Nash - Richard Chitwood - William Bodche [Burch?]
Sarah Nash - Seth Chitwood - Morris James
Vincent Carrico - John Brown - William Musick
Denis Carrico - David Brown - John Graham
William Patterson - Therese Brown - Robert Young
John Patterson - William Davis

Among the French from St. Ferdinand who attended the sale, represented by Louis and Antoine Dubreuil, who acted as interpreters were:
Louis Dubreuil - Manuel Andre Roque - Charles Dejarlais
Baptiste Creely - Andre Pelletier - Hyacinthe Dehetre
Antoine Deharlais - Joseph Presse

Others who settled in the Cold Water area were:
Gabriel Lard - Guy Seele - Samuel Hodges
Cumberland James - Farquar McKenzie - Daniel Hodges
Benjamin James - Isabelle Chitwood - William Robertson
James James - John Nathaniel Seeley - Gilbert Hodges
Sarah James - Samuel Duncan - Aaron Quick
James B. Hart - Lydia Quick - Edmond Hodges
Elisha Harrington - William Rogers

The concession for land to John Brown dated November 16, 1798, for 600 arpens, was described as on the “Rousseau de Florissant” (U.S. Survey 104). The concession to John Patterson dated the same, describes his 600 arpens as being on “French Town Creek” (U.S. Survey 105).

In 1802, William Davis built a distillery on a tract of land on the Missouri where he lived until 1808. He evidently became indebted to Samuel and Daniel Hodges, who were granted the land. (U.S. Survey 2027)

About a mile or so above the mill of Hezekiah Lard, Elias Harrington built a flouring mill on Cold Water Creek before 1803. His land (U.S. Survey 1012) was located at the place known to the French as the “Glaze aux Biches”. Harrington was a millwright and built several mills in the county. He came to the Cold Water District from his land in the Common Fields of St. Ferdinand with his wife and three children. In 1807, he sold the flouring mill along with the residence he had built to James Hart.

U.S. Survey 3023 was settled by Benjamin F. James. On December 10, 1805, James Mackay testified that he had given permission of James to settle on the land when he was Commandant of St. Andre. February 21, 1806, Edmond Hodges testified that “James put up a cabin in 1803, and in 1804 kept school and has been inhabiting the land to this day.” On June 18, 1834, when this land was claimed by the heirs of Benjamin Franklin James, Catherine S. James (wife or widow of Morris James) swore that she was in her 65th year; that in 1804 she saw a small field of corn growing and said James lived on his place until his death, which occurred in 1815. At the time of his death, he had several cabins and an orchard of apple and peach trees, and that he occasionally taught school in the neighborhood. This tract of land was on the south side of Sinks Road near its intersection with Old Jamestown Road or Accomadation Road.”

SOURCE-FROM PROBATE RECORDS FOR SPOUSE MORRIS JAMES:
St. Louis Probate Court Digitization Project: 1802 - 1900
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/stlprobate/Default.asp
Morris James
Case Number 1109 Date Filed 1834 Microfilm Reel C27488

Collection 7 Document 3

The handwriting on this page is very difficult to read.
The page begins:
“A list of accounts of a final settlement of the estate of Morris James deceased by the Administrator as will show below …

… 1839
March T [term]

…estate on part [can't read]

apportion I

Catherine S. James - widow 1/3 …….. 45.83 1/3

Sarah the wife of Mr. Blackburn ……...30.55L

Wm. McDowns -Fanny- children who are:
grandchildren of deceased
William……………………………….…10.18 2/6
Mary C or K…………………………….10.18 2/6
Elizabeth………………………………...10.18 2/6

Edith Neil's children who are the
grandchildren of the deceased
Phineas………………………………….15,27 3/6
Andromaque[?]…………………………15.27 3/6”

SOURCE-1830 CENSUS:
<ancestry.com>
1830 St. Ferdinand Twp., St. Louis Co., MISSOURI
Roll 72, Page 296
Morris James
-1 male 60 and under 70 [Morris James b. 1760-70]
-1 female 20 and under 30 [Sara "Sally" James b. 1805]
-1 female 60 and under 70 [Catherine Sullivan James b. abt 1769]



Aloha,

Marilyn and Dan Devaney in Hawaii