Posted By:Mary Bannan
Email:
Subject:Benjamin Franklin Larzelere - b. 1816
Post Date:September 01, 2001 at 15:38:25
Message URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/larzelere/messages/29.html
Forum:Larzelere Family Genealogy Forum
Forum URL:http://genforum.genealogy.com/larzelere/

Hope this info will help someone. It is taken from a very old family Bible:

Benjamin Franklin Larzelere
b. 3/21/1816 (possibly Philadelphia)
m. Ann Eliza Roche 10/7/1841(b.11/20/1823, Wilmington, DE, d/o
James Manning Roche and his wife, Ann Cornelison Savoy

ch: Katie Ann Larzelere
b. 11/12/1843, Wilmington, DE
d. 2/5/1930, Granite City, Illinois
m. 10/18/1865, James Alfred Caleb, Hare's Corner, DE


Carrie Cornelison Larzelere
b. 5/6/1845, Wilmington, DE
m. John Ross, son of Cherokee Chief, John Ross


ch of James and Katie Larzelere Caleb:

Florence Ann Caleb
b. 12/25/1866, Delaware
m. 12/12/1804, Henry Benton Smith, Tahlequa, I.T.

James Alfred Caleb
b. 8/8/1868
d. 8/8/1868

ch of Henry and Florence Caleb Smith

Lelia Kathrine Smith
b. 9/14/1898, St. Louis
d. 10/8/1917, Park Hill, Oklahoma

Mary Ann B. Smith
b. 7/5/1899, Ardmore, Oklahoma

Francis Brook Smith
b. 11/6/1901, Whitewater, Wisconsin

James L. Smith
b. 8/26/1803, Fondulac, Wisconsin


Benjamin Franklin Larzelere was a wheelwright and evidently moved quite a bit. Not certain, but I believe that James Alfred Caleb and Henry Benton Smith were both ministers, but I do no know what faith. I believe that Henry Benton Smith was a graduate of the Indian School in Tahlequa, Indian Territory, so he may have been a Native American.

When Carrie Larzelere married John Ross (the second son of Chief John Ross of the Cherokees to bear the name John) the entire family, Carrie and John, her sister Katie and her family, and even their parents moved to Tahlequa, Indian Territory. The women in the family were, I believe teachers.

Ann Eliza Roche Larzelere, Benjamin's wife, was a passionate "missionary" for her faith (again, I don't know which faith) and spent many hours praying, attending church services, and visiting the sick and the poor. The family lived for a short time in Moorestown, NJ (about 1850) and at that time, Ann Eliza was asked to preach the Sunday sermon -- something unheard, I believe, for a woman in that time period.