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Re: Early Dockstaders
Posted by: Charles Julian (ID *****7539) Date: April 03, 2006 at 23:57:31
In Reply to: Re: Early Dockstaders by Charles Julian of 187

1. Updates

Janette has found the reference to Marcus and Lieutenant John Dachsteder from John N. Dockstader's "The Dockstader Family"

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John N. Dockstader, "The Dockstader Family"
Face Page 1
Book 1

"Johnannes Dockstader Sr. and Johannes Jr.

"Johannes Sr. is deduced from the record of Johannes Jr. and his recommendation for a commission in 1768. The use of Jr. indicates that his father was also named Johannes. [ ( Janette notes: ) he then quotes from the NY State Historian Vol. II page 890 but he doesn't include the Jr. and he makes 1768 into 1786. I'm glad you found the same reference through Swigget (?) but I'm not sure of the name as I left your letter quoting it at home. ] It seems probable that one of these Johannes's was the Tory Capt. John Dockstader who led the Indian raids through the Mohawk Valley during the Rev. War. These raiders were known as 'The Destructives' and a good picture of the times is contained in the book 'Drums along the Mohawk' by Edmonds. Tradition says that this Tory Dockstader lived on what is now known as the Delevan Briggs farm. This is substanciated by a descendant of another branch of the family whose great, great, grandfather lived on an adjoining farm, his name being Marcus Dockstader, and an ardent patriot. It is said that he hated the one who lived on the Briggs farm and had no use for him. Now this man who lived on the Briggs farm was John Dockstader. The house on Briggs Run is marked on a map, giving the residences as of 1790, as the home of George Adam ( 'Speck' ) Dockstader and was the only house left standing during the Indian Raids. From this circumstance and that of the roomfull of meat, which may have been supplies for the raider, it would seem that there was a strong connection, either family or political, or perhaps both, between Adam Dockstader and Tory Capt. John."

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It's proof enough for me pending evidence to the contrary. Also of note, on the preceding page of the same book there is mention of the legend of Cornelius Dachstaeder, and this may have been the source for Doris D-R's inclusion of Cornelius as a second son of Johann Georg, though a source for the legend is not here given ( also, apologies in advance for more non-P.C. language that's bound to turn up in sources as the Dockstader research continues ):

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"One Dockstader boy married an Indian squaw. Tradition speaks of him as 'Old Cornelius of Indian Castle.' I am inclined to think that he was a son and not a grandson of the first George as the trappers and hunters of this generation associated more with the Indians. It is significant that while he named his sons after his brothers, none of them named any of theirs after the one who turned squaw man. [ ! ] The name Cornelius does not appear for generations. I would place him between George Adam and Hendrick."

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This is a whole lot of guesswork, and apparently there is not an original written source for the legend. Cornelius Doxtator b. Abt 1758 was Native American himself, so I doubt the legend of a marriage can have pertained to him. One possibility is that later German Dockstaders, on hearing that the name of the Oneida Chief killed at Chippewa was also Dockstader, coined the story in order to explain how this might be. "Dockstader" is not exactly "Smith" or "Jones", and given no other information the most logical explanation for this correspondence would be that a Dachstaeder had married a Native American woman. "Cornelius", as mentioned before, is unlikely to have been a name among Johann Georg1 and Anna Elisabetha's children, and consequently I suspect that the "Brother Cornelius" story is probably based on folk legend rather than fact.

However, I have wondered in recent days ( further Otatshehte research pending ) whether Hanyery, or "Hance Ury", might not have taken his English name from Hans Georg2 ( pronounced Hance Yury ) Dachsteder, fifth son of Georg1. Hans Georg2 was in the French and Indian wars and resided at German Flatts, to which location Hanyery seems also to have had ties. I've recently read several accounts, albeit mostly from the 19th century, wherein the names of European colleagues or co-workers were adopted by Six Nations People when European names became necessary. It is curious that Hanyery in effect shares both his first and last name with Hans Georg2 Dachsteder, and so perhaps there is a connection with a son of Georg1 rather than with Georg1 himself. The first reference to Hanyery on record pertains to the year 1734, but appears only to have been recorded later ( i.e. retrospectively ) in 1769, nearer to the time of the Revolution and at the close of the French and Indian War, during which interval Thohwen'karahkwen may have taken "Hans Georg Dockstader" as his English name. Another possibility anyway.


2. Wives of John Dochstader

Figuring out the identity of Philip Young and his wife Mary will probably be the last part of this Loyalist Dachsteder puzzle to slot into place Philip Young left no marriage record, named one child after himself and the other "Elizabeth", then died at an age and a time before anyone is likely to have penned mention of him. His widow then remarried to John Stevens as "Maria Jung", in effect leaving no clue as to her identity. Following the outcome of the Revolution few if any authors seem to have written about John Stevens or his family, and there is little mention of him apart from that he settled in Stamford and that his name occurs on a town plaque. Consequently, finding the original pre-first-marriage maiden name of John Stevens' wife in Canadian sources is not something that's to be reasonably expected, and the odds of finding any mention of Philip Young Sr. in Canada is zero. This one's going to be a real haul.

In the meantime it will be worthwhile to start discerning the identities of John Dochstader's wives. Of these I have so far posited five to six. The children from John's will and their Nations, where known, are:

1. John Dochstader Junior ( probably born Abt 1768, probably Mohawk )
2. Adam Dochstader of Buffalo Creek ( Seneca )
3. Joseph Dochstader of Mohawk Castle ( Mohawk )
4. Wari Dochstader of Mohawk Castle ( Mohawk )
5. Mary Dochstader ( Cayuga )
6. Catherine Dochstader ( Onondaga )

Among the Six Nations, children belong to the Nation and Clan of their mother. Mary and Catherine are stated to have been born of Cayuga and Onondaga mothers, respectively, in a document found in Valley of the Six Nations ( see section six below ). Joseph and Wari are stated in John's will to be residents of Mohawk Castle ( i.e. the seat of the Mohawks at Six Nations ), thus indicating they had a Mohawk mother. Adam of Buffalo Creek, New York, was a member of the Seneca Nation according to an 1826 treaty on which his mark occurs ( see section eight below ), and therefore had a Seneca mother. The Nation of John Dachsteder Junior is never given, but since he was apparently the oldest son of John Dochstader Sr, and Captain John lived in the Mohawk Valley near the Mohawk Castle, it is reasonable to suppose John Junior's mother was a Mohawk woman.

Preliminary observations: Where previously I've placed Adam Dochstader of Buffalo Creek as the second oldest, I now suspect he is probably the fourth child, the reason being that the Seneca are the westernmost of the Six Nations and historically they resided much nearer Niagara Falls. Thus Captain John of the Mohawk Valley is unlikely to have met a Seneca wife until some time after the Revolution had come to a close, as she would doubtless have resided at Seneca Castle. In light of this it might be better to posit John's children in the following order:

1. John Dochstader Junior ( probably born Abt 1768, probably Mohawk )
2. Joseph Dochstader of Mohawk Castle ( Mohawk )
3. Wari Dochstader of Mohawk Castle ( Mohawk )
4. Adam Dochstader of Buffalo Creek ( Seneca )
5. Mary Dochstader ( Cayuga )
6. Catherine Dochstader ( Onondaga )

This schema would also narrow down the number of wives to five, the first three children possibly having the same mother. Adam was presumably named for John's father. Joseph and Wari (the Mohawk form of the name "Mary" or, given the presence of another Mary, perhaps "Molly") were probably named for Joseph and Molly Brant, and if there is any truth to a Brant family connection then their mother, an unidentified Mohawk woman, would be the one that bears this legend out. If indeed she was also the mother of John Dochsteder Junior, then Captain John will have had five wives.

1. Unknown ( Mohawk )
2. Unknown ( Seneca )
3. Unknown ( Cayuga ) d. Abt 1785 [ very rough estimate ]
4. Unknown ( Onondaga, sister of Kaneahintwaghte ) d. Abt 1790 [ very rough estimate ]
5. Sarah Burns alias Sally Ann Van Gorder [ no issue, outlived Captain John ]

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3. A DEED FROM THE SIX NATIONS INHABITING THE GRAND RIVER, FEBRUARY 26, 1787
P.A.C., Indian Affairs, Indian Records, Six Nations & Niagara, 1763-1810, XV, 201-4.
Reproduced in C.M. Johnston, "Valley of the Six Nations", pp. 71-72.

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Let it be known to all, now and henceforth what is now agreed to and performed by us, mutual brethren and children of the Five Nations, and our Nephews of the Delawar race living on the Ohswego, or Grand River, in full Council in which assembled Mohawks, Oniadas, Onondagas, Cayugas and Delawars

Therefore let it be known by all, that in virtue of a grant of the Grand River made unto us by Sir Fred. Haldimand Governor, in the Kings name which he has given us in writing his Name and seal thereunto affixed, confering the said lands upon us the Five Nations and our posterity; We agree that our brethren living on the same River, to wit Hendrick Nelles, Robert Nelles, Warner Nelles, Adam Young, John Young, Daniel Young, Hendrick Young, John Dochsteder, Hendrick Huff, John Huff, shall hold a farm each, according to the boundaries, which now mark their possessions, along the banks of the said River, which they are by no means to exceed either up or down the stream, and consisting of the same breadth, the said farms are to extend in length three miles back from the said Rivers bank.

Of this extent we confirm to them and their posterity, the full right to have and to hold the same in their respective families to wit, Hendrick Nelles, Robert Nelles Warner Nelles, Adam Young, John Young, Daniel Young, Hendrick Young, John Dochsteder, Hendrick Huff, John Huff, to be possessed by them and their posterity and never to be transferred to any other whomsoever

This being done and concluded by us Five Nations and our Nephews the Delawares, let never our Grand Children or any whomsoever attempt to undo what we have done the same with due consideration. In the Year of our Lord 1787. and 26th day of February and to confirm the same we hereunto affix our hand and emblems of our tribes

[ totem ] Thomas Satckariwate
[ totem ] Hendrick Tekarihogea
Aaron Hill
[ totem ] Jos. Brant Thayendangea
David Hill
Paulus Sahonwadi
Thomas Davis
X Thomas Shoghsgoharowani
X Kayeadadishon
*
X Adam Thaweyakiarat
X David Aghsigwarison
X Hendrick Crondadekha
X Jacobus Oghsonwaghlageghte
[ totem ] John Atoghserangegh
Tekaenyough
* omitted, the signature of David Oserageghte.
X Karenghodon
X Ogh Kwarighoghsita
X Oraghywanindagon
X Orighnia Saywadon
X Aweanaratye

True translation
John Norton

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4. BRANT'S DECLARATION RESPECTING BLOCK 6, JUNE 9, 1802
P.A.C., Indian Affairs, Records and Correspondence of the Deputy Superintendent General, XXVI (1802), 440 ff.
Reproduced in C.M. Johnston, "Valley of the Six Nations", pp. 178-179.

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Know all men that I Joseph Brant as Agent for the Six Nations Indians in Upper Canada, do by these Presents declare, that a Tract of Land consisting of about nineteen thousand acres, adjoining to the Grand River, was originally given by the Six Nations to Lieutenant John Datchsteder, as a mark of their affection for him and as a reward for his Services with them and that no money as the price thereof or annual Rent as a compensation therefor was ever excepted [ sic ] by them from him

I do further declare, that with the consent of the said Six Nations, and they having for this purpose ceded their right in the aforesaid Tract of Land to Government, the aforesaid John Datchsteder for a valuable consideration did sell unto Benjamin Canby the said Tract of Land, which was thereupon confirmed to him by Deed under the Great Seal of the Province

But whereas in this Deed ( as in others not given as a free Gift ) mention is made of a security given Benjamin Canby for the payment of five thousand pounds unto the Honorable David William Smith, Captain William Claws and Alexander Stewart Esquire in trust for the said Indians as if that sum had been due by him to them I do further declare that no such Security was ever taken or intended to be taken Because the Land was designed to be a free gift from the said Six Nations unto the aforesaid John Datchsteder and that he John Datchsteder did receive from Benjamin Canby, a full compensation without any regard to such security in proff of which the Deed did issue in the same Benjamin Canby's name Nothing being due by him to the said Six Nations for the same or any part thereof. And these circumstances were the reason why the said Trustees did not take the Security alluded to, when they altogether, with Benjamin Canby and myself were present at Niagara and authorized the said Benjamin Canby to receive the Deed in his own name.

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5. BRANT TO HENRY ALLCOCK
P.A.C., Indian Affairs, Records and Correspondences of the Deputy Superintendent General, XXVI (1803), 482 ff.
Reproduced in C.M. Johnston, "Valley of the Six Nations", pp. 179-180.

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[ Burlington ] Beach, 17 June 1803

When I last had the pleasure of conversing with you, you mentioned it would be necessary for me, to send you the Will of the late Capt John Dochsteder, and Mr Canby's bond to him, either the original or the copies, the better to acquaint you with the business I therefore now send you those papers enclosed with a draft of the land disposed of and reserved

I understand Mr Canby intends paying no more of the money for which he has given his bond Should the law favor him in this attempt, it would be injuring the creditors, as well as the heirs, for the law would certainly never authorize them to seize property on the Indian lands, consequently they would hev to wait until the debts due the estate might be collected to pay them

Four people have taken their oaths before a Magistrate to the veracity of the Will of the deceased Capt John Dochsteder, which Canby thinks to invalidate by having bought for fifty pounds his elder brother Henry Dochsteder's right pf heirship this I think is an odd kind of merchandize to deal in. It would give me particular satisfaction, and many other chiefs of the Five Nations should the Chief Justice be pleased to point out to us the method to be taken to have this business equitably settled so as to provide for the children and honsetly to pay the Creditors, and to name the person to administer, for in the present situation of affairs nothing can be done, neither creditors paid nor debts collected; during my friends life, he had several times expressed his intention of appointing me the executor of his will this caused me to step forward at his decease, though the will was not so far finished as to name the Executor; but finding many intricacies in law, which I do not well comprehend I would rather some other person should be appointed, that may be better acquainted with law

I hope the Chief Justice will pardon this further request, that the business now before you, respecting the Five Nations lands on the Grand River, as well as the enclosed, may be brought to a conclusion; although it may not be so much to our satisfaction as we have expected, we will yet consider it a favor to be relieved from suspence, and be saved from further expence and trouble; For hitherto we have been led from hopes to disappointment, flattered one moment with the speedy execution of our business the next some obstacle is brought in the way, and we are left as far distant from the accomplishment of our wishes, as we ever were.

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6. Excerpt from PROCEEDINGS OF A SIX NATIONS COUNCIL AT ONONDAGA, NOVEMBER 9, 1806
P.A.C., Indian Affairs, Records and Correspondences of the Deputy Superintendent General, XXVI
Reproduced in C.M. Johnston, "Valley of the Six Nations", pp. 136-138.

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[ . . . ]

Brother,
As it was in confidence of the protection of our Great Father, that we accepted of this place for an asylum and fixed here our habitations. We therefore in behalf of all our tribes, intreat that his Representative in this Province, His Excellency the Lt Governor may cause these portions of our lands to be freed from all unjust incumbrance, and left open to the honest purchaser, who may bid the fairest, and perform his promise, as it is our intent to do justice to such as have honorably paid: so is it our desire to receive that justice from those who have bargained or who may bargain; which we expected to be insured to us by Government, when we surrendered to them, the tract of land to be disposed of. Among these difficulties we may also include, that tract of land disposed of by the late Mr Dochsteder. You know that the Chiefs, many of whom are now deceased, gave to him, as well as the others, who had served in the war with them an allotment of land, this was enlarged to him in regard to his children who belonged to our tribes; and by us are considered, as being legitimate, according to our customs, he had first been married to a Cayuga woman by whom he had one daughter, and at her decease to a woman of the Onondagas, by whom he had another daughter: both children he brought up in the house with himself before and after the death of their mothers The tract thus given him he extended without our knowledge, by a fraudulent survey, which when we first discovered, explaining it to be for the benefit of the Orphans in compassion to them we have made no remonstrance, thinking that as they had acquired the superfluous wants of Europeans, they might stand in need of it all.

Brother,
We are sorry to find that in regard to these, in no respect has our intention been fulfilled. The oldest daughter is dead, and the youngest remains pinched by poverty notwithstanding the generosity of the Five Nations on her account; while a Mr Canby has obtained a Grant for twenty thousand acres, or thereabouts, of our land, without paying her according to the agreement of her deceased father, or accounting for it to us in any wise.

[ . . . ]

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7. Excerpt from RESOLUTION OF A SIX NATIONS COUNCIL AT THE ONONDAGA VILLAGE, MARCH 1, 1809
P.A.C., Indian Affairs, Records and Correspondence of the Deputy Superintendent General, XXVII, 511 ff.
Reproduced in C.M. Johnston, "Valley of the Six Nations", pp. 110-112.

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[ . . . ]

Brothers,
A tract of land that was granted to John Dochsteder, who had also a family of our nation; but who sold a great piece of land to a Mr Canby which exceeded what we intended to give but as we expected that the income or payment to be derived therefrom would fall to his family who were our people we did not oppose it; but that not having been the case we desire that justice may be done them The farm in possession of his daughter of the Onondagas and Grand son of the Cayugas [ John Dochsteder Burnham ] we confirm to them.

[ . . . ]

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8. TREATY OF AUGUST 31, 1826 SENECA NATION TO ROBERT TROUP, T.L. OGDEN AND B.W. ROGERS
Reproduced in L.R.A. Doty (1905), "A History of Livingston County, NY", pp. lxxvi-lxxix.

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At a treaty held under the authority of the Unites states at Buffalo Creek, the County of Erie in the State of New York, between the sachems, chiefs and warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians, on behalf of said nation, and Robert Troup, Thomas L. Ogden and Benjamin W. Rogers, Esquires, of the city of New York, in the presence of Oliver Forward, Esq. commissioner appointed by the United States for holding said treaty, and of Nathaniel Gorham, Esq., superintendent in behalf of the State of Massachusetts.

Know all Men by these Presents that the said sachems, chiefs and warriors for and in consideration of the sum of forty eight thousand two hundred and sixty dollars ($48,260) lawful money of the United States to him in hand paid by the said Robert Troup, Thomas L. Ogden and Benjamin W. Rogers, at or immediately before the ensealing and delivering of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged have granted, sold, aliened, released, quite-claimed and confirmed and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, alien, release, quit-claim and confirm unto the said Robert Troup, Thomas Ludlow Ogden and Benjamin W. Rogers, and their heirs and assigns forever all that tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Caneadea Reservation, situate lying and being in the county of Allegany in the State of New York and containing sixteen square miles. Also all that other tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Canawagus Reservation situtate lying and being the county of Livingston in the said State of New York and containing two square miles. Also all the other tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Big Tree Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Livingston, containing two square miles. Also all the other tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Squawky Hill Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Livingston and containing two square miles.

Also all that other tract of land commonly called and known b y the name of the Gardeau Reservation situate, lying and being in the county of Genesee in the said State of New York and containing two square miles, and being that part of the original Gardeau Reservation which was excepted and reserved out of the the sale of a part of the same to John Greig and Henry B. Gibson at a treaty held at Moscow in the said county of Livingston on the third day of September, 1823. Also all that other tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Buffalo Creek Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Erie and containing by estimation seventy-eight thousand five hundred and fifty-seven (83,577) acres, excepting, nevertheless and always reserving out the said Buffalo Creek reservation the following tract, piece or parcel thereof, that is to say, seventy-eight square miles or forty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty (49,920) acres bounded as follows, that is to say: Beginning on the north line of the said reservation at a point one mile and a half east of the Cayuga creek, running thence south one mile and a half; thence east parallel with the north line so far as that a line to be drawn from the termination thereof south to a point one mile distant from the south line of said reservation and thence west parallel with the said south line to the west line of the reservation and thence along the west and north line of the same to the place of beginning will contain the said quantity of seventy eight square miles or forty-nine thousand, nine hundred and twenty (49,209) acres.

Also all that tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Tonawanda Reservation, situate, lying and being in the said county of Genesee and Erie and containing by estimation forty-six thousand, two hundred and nine (46,209) acres, excepting nevertheless and always reserving out the Tonawanda Reservation the following tract piece or parcel thereof, that is to say, twelve thousand eight hundred (12,800) acres, to be laid off in one body in such a manner as that one-half thereof shall all be on one side of the Tonawanda Creek and the other half on the other side of the creek, and connecting at a point on said creek one mile and a half west of where it crosses the line of the said reservation, and the said creek being the center of the said twelve thousand eight hundred (12,800) acres, until it strikes the northwest corner of the Tonawanda Reservation.

Also the following piece or parcel of that other tract of land commonly called and known by the name of the Cattaraugus Reservation, situate, lying and being in the counties of Chautauqua, Cattaraugus, and Erie, in the said state of New York, that is to say one square mile or six hundred and forty (640) acres, to be laid off in a square form in the south-west corner of said reservation; six square miles or three thousand eight hundred and forty (3,840) acres in the north part of the said reservation, bounded on the north and on the east by the north and east lines of the said reservation; on the west by a line parallel to the east line, and six miles distant therefrom, and on the south by a line parallel to the north line and one mile distant therefrom. And one other square mile of six hundred and forty (640) acres to be laid off in a sqaure form, bounded as follows, that is to say, on the east by the east line of the said reservation; on the west by a line parallel thereto and one mile distant there from; on the north by the south line of the piece last above described, and on the south by a line parallel therto and one mile distant therefrom. And which said several tracts, pieces or parcels of land so excepted and reserved as aforesaid, out of the said Buffalo Creek and Tonawanda Reservations, are fully and clearly understood to remain the property of the said parties of the first part and their nation, in as full and ample a manner as if these presents had not been executed, together with all and singular the rights, priviledges and appurtenances to the saidhereby granted premises belonging or in anywise appertaining and all of the estate, right title and interest, claim and demand whatsoever of them the said parties of the first part and all their nation of, in and to the said several tracts, ppieces and parcels of land above described except as is above excepted, to have and to hald all and singular the said granted premises with the appurtenances unto the said Robert Troup, Thomas L Ogden and Benjamin W. Rogers, their heirs and assigns, in trust for the use, benefit and behood of themselves and such other person or persons as are respectively entitled to the right of pre-emption of the said several tracts, pieces or parcels of land or any part or portion thereof.

In testimony where of the parties to these presents have hereunto and to three other instruments of the same tenor and date, one to remain with the United States, one to remain with the State of Massachusetts, one to remain with the Seneca Nation Of Indians and one to remain with the said Robert Troup, Thomas L. Ogden, and Benjamin Woolsey Rogers, interchangeably set their hands and seals, at the council house at Buffalo Creek the thirty-first day of August, 1826.

La-qui-um-gar-tu-ohta, or Young King, his X mark, (L. S.)
Kar-hun-da-wu-na, or Pollard, his X mark, (L. S.)
Fosh-ka-uga, or Little Billy, his X mark, (L. S.)
John Abeal, or Cornplanter, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ty-wau-eash or Blacksnake, his X mark, (L. S.)
Na-hal-sta, or Strong, his X mark, (L. S.)
Uon-hon-dxt-gah-le, or Chief Warrior, his X mark, (L. S.)
Tu-y-a-go, or Senaca White, his X mark, (L. S.)
On-a-trah-kai, or Tall Peter, his X mark, (L. S.)
San-ged-quate, or James Robison, his X mark, (L. S.)
A-sah-ea-nor, or White Seneca, his X mark, (L. S.)
On-onda-hai, or Destroytown, his X mark, (L. S.)
Usla-eye, or Charles Obeal, his X mark, (L. S.)
Te-ugh-ta-gud-ta, or Tunis Halftown, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ie-u-gar-se, or Long John, his X mark, (L. S.)
Uan-eae-ga, or Blue Eyes, his X mark, (L. S.)
La-him-euha, or Little Johnson, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ty-at-a-hada, or Dochstader, his X mark, (L. S.)
Udl-wen-dy-ha, or Green Blanket, his X mark, (L. S.)
U-ut-ha-da-gau, or White Bay, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ua-hu-hevidia, or Isaacs, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ua-pau-quish, or Henry Two Guns, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ge-much-tha-de, or Stevenson, his X mark, (L. S.)
Len-aeh-te-no-go, or John __, his X mark, (L. S.)
She-can-achwesch-gue, or Little Bear, his X mark, (L. S.)
Au-a-shod-akai, or Tall Chief, his X mark, (L. S.)
Ha-wan-sai, or Captain Snow, his X mark, (L. S.)
Pa-he-gan-one, or Twenty Canoes, his X mark, (L. S.)
As-alon-a-saith, or Silverheels, his X mark, (L. S.)
Kan-on-ga-iot, or Long Chief, his X mark, (L. S.)
Uan-ish-an, or Barefoot, his X name, (L. S.)
Mile-la-go-or, or Captain Crow, his X name, (L. S.)
Sa-gun-ja-wa, or Lonnee's Cousin, his X name, (L. S.)
Kam-au-ja-uana, or Big Kellle, his X name, (L. S.)
Ty-a-go-dou-te, or Joseph Snow, his X name, (L. S.)
__ or Joseph Leguany, his X name, (L.S.)
So-wam-a-wa, or William Blacksnake, his X mark, (L. S.)
Say-way-do, or George Redeye, his X mark, (L. S.)
Kau-is-h-shorge, or Captain Shongo, his X mark, (L. S.)
Sa-gu-i-oth, or Jones Undson, his X name, (L. S.)
La-ga-in-a-shot-sia, or Stiffneck, his X mark, (L. S.)
La-gua-ota, or Red Jacket, his X mark, (L. S.)
Kah-do-way, or Cohn Fopp, his X mark, (L. S.)
Lo-ye-awa, or Con Snow, his X mark, (L. S.)
Te-go-hia, or Tompson, his X mark, (L. S.)
K-and-gae, or James Stevenson, Jr, his X mark, (L. S.)
Peaea-dyo, or John Snow, his X mark, (L. S.)
Robert Troup (by his attorney John Greig,) (L.S.)
Thomas L. Ogden (by his attorney John Greig.) (L.S.)
Benjamin W. Rogers (by his attorney John Greig.) (L.S.)

The words "and a half" twice interlined on the second page before executing sealing and delivering, in presence of Joseph Parish, Indian agent; Horatio Jones, interpreter; Levi Hubbell; Jacob Jimeson, interpreter.

Done at a treaty held with the sachems, chiefs and warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians at Buffalo Creek in the county of Erie and state of New York on the thirty first day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six (1826), under the authority of the United States.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid, by virtue of a commission issued under the seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts bearing date the 31st day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen (1815), pursuant to a resolution of the Legislature of the said Commonwealth pased the 11th day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and nenty-one (1791.)

N Gorham, Superintendent.

I have attended a treaty of the Seneca Nation of Indians held at Buffalo Creek in the county of Erie and State of New York on the 31st day of August 1826, when the foregoing instrucment was duly executed in my presence by the sachems, chiefs and warriors of the said nation, being fairly and properly understood, and transacted by all the parties of Indians concerned, and declared to be done to their universal satisfaction.

I do therefore certify and approve of the same,
Oliver Forward, Commissioner.

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