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Re: Fisher and Cunningham from Hardy County
Posted by: Lewis (ID *****6724) Date: August 18, 2012 at 21:29:30
In Reply to: Fisher and Cunningham from Hardy County by Jennifer Mace of 10387


http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/9187032/person/-794457901


Jacob MACE
Birth July 1760 in , , Virginia, United States
Death Living
Death 28 July 1835 in Union City, Ross, Ohio, United States
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Parents & Siblings
John MACE (1740-) No Mother Spouse & Children
Sarah (-) No Children Spouse & Children
Elizabeth "Bettie" FISHER (1772-1807) Andrew Mace (1791-1820) Jesse MACE, Sr. (1796-1860) Job Mace (1802-1838) Mary Mace (1815-) Margaret Mace (1817-1832) Anna Mace (1827-1829) Spouse & Children
Becky Dillin (1787-) Elizabeth Mace (-) Isaac Mace (-) John Mace (-) Morgan Mace (-) Nancy Mace (-) Sarah Mace (-) Simeon Mace (-) Solomon Mace (-) Nicholas Mace (1793-1864) Jesse Mace (1795-1865) Jacob Mace (1808-) Hiram Mace (1813-) Andrew Mace (1820-) Andrew Mace (1820-) Linked to Family Tree Maker

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1760

Jul
Birth
, , Virginia, United States

1788

Age: 28 Marriage to Elizabeth "Bettie" FISHER
Virginia, USA

1800

-1902

Age: 40 Residence
Ross, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations The county of Ross : a history of Ross County, Ohio, from the earliest days, with special chapters on the bench and bar, medica

1806

Age: 46 Residence
Ross County, OH
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1807

Age: 47 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1808

28 Aug

Age: 48 Marriage to Becky Dillin
, Ross, Ohio, USA

1808

Age: 48 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1809

Age: 49 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1810

Age: 50 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1810

Age: 50 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1816

Age: 56 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1818

Age: 58 Residence
Ross County, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations Ohio Census, 1790-1890

1830

Age: 70 Residence
Union, Ross, Ohio
1 source citation Hide source citations 1830 United States Federal Census

1835

28 Jul

Age: 75 Death
Union City, Ross, Ohio, United States

Burial
Bank of Scioto River, Ross, Ohio, United States Behind the Ross County Fairgrounds along the Scioto River. Tombstone is in Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe, Ross, Ohio, United States

CommentsNo comments have been added yet. Add a comment Family MembersParentsJohn MACE
1740 –
No Mother Spouse & ChildrenSarah Spouse & ChildrenElizabeth "Bettie" FISHER
1772 – 1807
Andrew Mace
1791 – 1820
Jesse MACE, Sr.
1796 – 1860
Job Mace
1802 – 1838
Mary Mace
1815 –
Margaret Mace
1817 – 1832
Anna Mace
1827 – 1829
Spouse & ChildrenBecky Dillin
1787 –
Elizabeth Mace Isaac Mace John Mace Morgan Mace Nancy Mace Sarah Mace Simeon Mace Solomon Mace Nicholas Mace
1793 – 1864
Jesse Mace
1795 – 1865
Jacob Mace
1808 –
Hiram Mace
1813 –
Andrew Mace
1820 –
Andrew Mace
1820 –
Family group sheet Source Information
view details
1830 United States Federal Census
1 citation provides evidence for Residence, Name
Ancestry Family Trees
This citation provides evidence for Jacob MACE
Ohio Census, 1790-1890
8 citations provide evidence for Name, Residence
The county of Ross : a history of Ross County, Ohio, from the earliest days, with special chapters on the bench and bar, medica
1 citation provides evidence for Name, Residence
Web Links


John MACE
Birth Abt 1740 in England?
Death Living
Death in Virginia, USA

Henry Mace- Hampshire County, VA/WV
Henry Mace I

Name: Henry Mace I
Born: 1720/1730 England
Died: 1781 Hampshire, West Virginia
Related through: Erin's grandmother Idonna Nuttall Madson
Henry Mace I was born in 1720/1730 in England. He died in 1781 in Hampshire, West Virginia. He married Ann Petty about 1750. She was born about 1730 in Pennsylvania. She died about 1800 in Hardy, West Virginia. They had seven children. We are descended through their son Henry Mace II.

Henry and his brother Nicholas both bought land in what was then Augusta County, Virginia. There was another brother, John, who ended up in N.C. and was later killed by Indians along with his family. A son, Jacob, survived and came north to live with Maces in present day Hardy County. Henry and Nicholas moved north to present day Hardy in the early 1770s. I got the majority of this article from a book about the Mace family by a woman named Gretchen Ann Mace Velasco. She does not believe that the name was Mace originally but was Maese/Maisch or some variation thereof. She also thinks they came to Virginia from what is now Dauphin/Lebanon County, Penn. and that they were Huguenots. I thought that way very interesting, see this article about Huguenots.

The Western Augusta Territory was a vast, wild area featuring mountains, deep ravines, severe climate and many rivers and streams flowing west to the Ohio and Kanawa rivers. Fertile land was scarce and in the early 1700's only the hardiest of pioneer colonists ventured into the area. For the most part these pioneers were illiterate, relatively backward and adaptable to such severe environment. About 1715, the West Augusta territory, by order of the English King George I, was reformed into eight large counties, one of which was Augusta located in the northeast corner of present West Virginia. In 1753, the present county of Hampshire was formed from part of Augusta County. About 1758 Henry Mace I moved over from the south Pennsylvania border to the newly formed Hampshire County. Henry homesteaded in a valley on the South Fork of the Potomac River about twenty miles south of Moorhead, Hampshire County, VA. (now West Virginia)

From the limited data on Henry Mace I, it appears that he was a solid citizen. Early Augusta County records show that on January 2, 1761 he signed a petition for the building of a road. Also, Henry was made a naturalized citizen on November 16, 1774. It is known that he was illiterate, and that he fit the pattern for survival in the out-back area of Virginia. He preferred the isolation and the freedom from the influence of English royalty which dominated the coastal plains area. Henry was physically tough, willing to jerk a living off the land, and a good hunter of game in the wild.

After years of farming and hunting, the residents of Hampshire County faced the prospects of the American Revolution and its consequences to them. Few residents fully understood nor joined actively in the prosecution of the Revolutionary War. Henry, along with other Hampshire residents enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army. Two sons John and Isaac Mace also enlisted. Service for the Hampshire military unit was probably confined to drilling and standing by for further orders as most of the active warfare was confined to the north and east colonial areas. Henry was a private in the "2nd Regiment of Virginia, Continental Army". His military record shows that he entered service July 1777 and deserted camp 10 August 1777 after a month and 10 days of service.

As the war progressed it became necessary for the newly formed continental government to assess and collect taxes and to raise the quota of men to carry on the war. This development caused the rebellion of a group of Hampshire residents who, in 1780, formed an insurgent band which refused to pay higher taxes and to furnish more men under the quota act. A group of Hampshire county English royalists formed a Tory party led by John Claypole with the avowed purpose of joining English General Cornwallis when he entered the area. The purpose of these insurgent groups became hopelessly confused in the illiterate minds of many Hampshire residents. Many signed conflicting petitions in support of both insurgent groups (the loyalists and the patriots). Henry Mace was one of them.

Henry Mace, while suspected of being a Tory (a British loyal) at the time of his death, did not merit the label in view of his illiteracy. The truth is that he and his two sons along with other illiterate mountain men of Hampshire County, Virginia were "taken in" by a John Brake and his partner, John Claypole. These two men were literate and wealthy --- both certain that British General Cornwallis would quell the colonial rebellion thereby making them influential in post-war developments in Hampshire County. The personal loyalty of the mountain men to Brake and Claypole did not include and understanding of what the two were up to.

In 1781 complaints were made by the sheriff or collectors of the revenue complained to Colonel Vanmeter (Patriot) that the people of Hampshire County resisted his attempts to collect taxes and furnish the quota of men to serve in the Patriot Army. General Morgan was called upon to quell this "rebellion". About June 18th, the Colonial Army marched from Winchester and arrived in the Tory section of Hampshire County. They took Claypole as prisoner and moved up the Lost River and crossed the South Branch Mountain. They found a cabin near the summit which was searched. An elderly man named Mace (Henry) and two of his sons ran from the cabin. Henry being closely pursued by an aid to General Morgan named Capt.William Snickers was aiming to take out Henry with his sword. One of Henry's sons, Isaac seeing this, fired a shot which passed through Snickers’ horse's neck. The horse and Snickers fell to the ground. An Irish waiter to General Morgan who had been with the Colonials thought Snickers was dead and shot Henry Mace in the excitement of the moment. It turns out that Snickers had only been bruised.

A petition for pardon of Henry Mace signed by his son John Mace was submitted and heard by the Hampshire County Court. Henry was posthumously pardoned later that year.

Sources
"Lyman Chalkey, Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlement of Virginia, Vol 1 16 Nov 1774.
Gretchen Ann Mace Velasco "The Mace Family in America, A Genealogy and History 1720-1990"

saintwomanadded this on 3 May 2012

West Virginia, Marriages Index, 1785-1971
about Jacob Mace
Name: Jacob Mace
Gender: Male
Spouse's Name: Polly Townsand
Spouse Gender: Female
Marriage Date: 4 Sep 1805
Marriage Place: Harrison, West Virginia




Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002
about Jacob Mace
Name: Jacob Mace
Spouse: Betsey Rains
Marriage Date: 26 Jan 1814
Marriage County: Greene


http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/20397680/person/19374386881?ssrc=

Jacob Mace
Birth Jul 1762 in Hardy, Bedford, Virginia, USA
Death Living
Death 28 Jul 1835 in Union Township, Ross County, Ohio, United States
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Parents & Siblings
John Mace (1740-) Hannah Borden (1740-) Spouse & Children
Bettie "Elizabeth" Fisher (1772-1807) Andrew Mace (1791-1820) John Mace (1795-1857) Jesse Mace I (1796-1860) Issac Mace (1798-1875) Job Mace (1802-1838) Spouse & Children
Rebecca "Becky" Dillin (1787-) Jacob Mace (1808-) Hiram Mace (1813-1879) Mary Mace (1815-) Margaret Mace (1817-1832) Andrew Mace (1820-) Anna Mace (1827-1829) Linked to Family Tree Maker

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Story

Mace Genealogy
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Timeline (View details)
1762

Jul
Birth
Hardy, Bedford, Virginia, USA

1788

Age: 26 Marriage to Bettie "Elizabeth" Fisher
Virginia, United States

1808

28 Aug

Age: 46 Marriage to Rebecca "Becky" Dillin
Ross, Ohio, United States

1830

Age: 68 Residence
Union, Ross, Ohio, United States
1 source citation Hide source citations 1830 United States Federal Census

1835

28 Jul

Age: 73 Death
Union Township, Ross County, Ohio, United States

CommentsNo comments have been added yet. Add a comment Family MembersParentsJohn Mace
1740 –
Hannah Borden
1740 –
Spouse & ChildrenBettie "Elizabeth" Fisher
1772 – 1807
Andrew Mace
1791 – 1820
John Mace
1795 – 1857
Jesse Mace I
1796 – 1860
Issac Mace
1798 – 1875
Job Mace
1802 – 1838
Spouse & ChildrenRebecca "Becky" Dillin
1787 –
Jacob Mace
1808 –
Hiram Mace
1813 – 1879
Mary Mace
1815 –
Margaret Mace
1817 – 1832
Andrew Mace
1820 –
Anna Mace
1827 – 1829
Family group sheet Source Information
view details
1830 United States Federal Census
1 citation provides evidence for Name, Residence
Ancestry Family Trees
This citation provides evidence for Jacob Mace
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Rebecca "Becky" Dillin
Birth 1787 in Rockingham, Virginia, United States
Death Living
Death in Union, Ohio, United States
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Parents & Siblings
No Father No Mother Spouse & Children
Jacob Mace (1762-1835) Jacob Mace (1808-) Hiram Mace (1813-1879) Mary Mace (1815-) Margaret Mace (1817-1832) Andrew Mace (1820-) Anna Mace (1827-1829) Linked to Family Tree Maker

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1787
Birth
Rockingham, Virginia, United States

1808

28 Aug

Age: 21 Marriage to Jacob Mace
Ross, Ohio, United States

Death
Union, Ohio, United States

CommentsNo comments have been added yet. Add a comment Family MembersParentsNo Father No Mother Spouse & ChildrenJacob Mace
1762 – 1835
Jacob Mace
1808 –
Hiram Mace
1813 – 1879
Mary Mace
1815 –
Margaret Mace
1817 – 1832
Andrew Mace
1820 –
Anna Mace
1827 – 1829
Family group sheet Source Information
view details
Ancestry Family Trees
This citation provides evidence for Rebecca "Becky" Dillin
Web LinksThere are no weblinks available for this person. Enter both an address and a name
Web address e.g., http://ancestry.com/search/ Name e.g., Ancestry Search Save or Cancel Search the web for Rebecca "Becky" Dillin
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Mace Genealogy

Mace Genealogy
Wednesday, January 19, 2005 Mace Genealogy William and Dorcas (Stalnaker) Mace William Mace is a great times three grandfather and son of Ebenezer and Mary (?) Mace. William was born in 1794 and is one of three children listed with Ebenezer and Mary on the 1810 census. He is 56 on the 1850 Randolph County Federal Census and is on the 1820, 1830, and 1840 Federal Censuses as well. William shows up on the Randolph County tax lists for the first time in 1818 and is also married by this time. Being 24 years of age in 1818 and not on the tax lists before this means he must have been elsewhere for a while. His first child is born in 1818, but there is no record of the marriage in Randolph, which probably would have been around 1817, provided there weren’t previous non-surviving children. The lack of a marriage date and location may be another indication of William and Dorcas not being in the county for several years. His wife was Dorcas Stalnaker, born in 1797 by the 1850 census. She was the daughter of Boston Stalnaker and if William’s father, Ebenezer did indeed marry Boston’s sister Mary, then William and Dorcas were first cousins. This is information submitted to the LDS Church and has no substantiation or basis in my opinion, but given the close relationship of Stalnakers and Maces, it cannot be ruled out. As mentioned before, though, Ebenezer first shows up in Randolph County by name in 1799. At that time, he and Mary already have children and the Stalnakers had been in the Tygarts Valley for several years, whereas Ebenezer had come from the north Hardy County area just before coming to Randolph. Still, there is evidence that the Maces and others associated, had traveled back and forth between the counties before settling. Probability is that Ebenezer had married in the Hardy County area to a Mary of now unknown origin. Hardy County records show no records of a marriage. The other male child shown in the 1810 census may have been Nicholas, already discussed, and the female would have been Sarah. Sarah is born in 1797 and later marries Jesse Wamsley. Hu Maxwell’s “HISTORY OF RANDOLPH COUNTY” describes William as being one of the four original settlers of Mingo. One of the other four is Dorcas’s brother Ferdinand Stalnaker. This would have been about 1820 or before, if true, and William did have land north of there by Riffle’s and Becca’s Creeks. Mingo is a little community on the upper end of the Tygarts Valley River close to the Pocahontas County border in south Randolph County. In 1820 William Mace and brother-in-law Jesse Wamsley buy land from Edward and Elizabeth Jackson on Hadden’s Mill Run of the east side of the Tygarts Valley River. I find no listing for Hadden’s Mill Run in present day maps, but another old land deed describes that Run near Riffle’s Creek and Pound Run. Alexander Scott Wither’s “CHRONICLES OF BORDER WARFARE” says that Hadden’s Mill Run became Becca’s Creek which is known today as Becky’s Creek. This area is between present day Huttonsville and Elkwater in Randolph County. There was a Hadden Fort just south of Elkwater and is thought to be in the Hamilton Cemetery just off of Hwy 219 and Kumbrabow Road (the supposed fort site is also where Boston Stalnaker is buried). In 1825 William Mace again buys land from the Jacksons, but no location is given other than Randolph County. Next, as far as available land documents show, William buys land from Charles See for one dollar. This is land that is bordering existing land already owned by William and may have been a land trade. The last two land transactions would indicate that William and Dorcas were still living around the Becca’s Creek area. Charles See was an owner of quite a bit of land and also had land around Hadden’s Mill Run and Riffle’s Creek. Then in 1835 William buys land much further south on Upper Thorny Flat. There is a Thorny Flat in present day Pocahontas County due west of Cass and southeast of Mace. The 1835 deed puts the land in Randolph County though, and Pocahontas was already an established County in 1821. Possibly Upper Thorny Flat was an area north of Thorny Flat and still in Randolph. In 1840 William and Dorcas sell land to their son, John Henry, which is described as lying in both Randolph and Pocahontas Counties. Maxwell’s “HISTORY OF RANDOLPH” also mentions William as one of three people in 1841, Ferdinand Stalnaker and Peter Harper being the others, who formed a hunting partnership to pay for their lands with furs and meat. The furs were taken east for sale. Farming was not very profitable in most of Randolph County with its narrow valleys, steep hills and forests, but hunting was. 1841 was also the year that Ferdinand Stalnaker died. In 1848 William, son John Henry and son-in-law Josiah Bridger buy land lying on the Elk and Tygarts Valley Rivers in both Pocahontas and Randolph Counties. Elk River begins its waters to the west and south of Tygarts Valley and runs parallel for a distance before turning west into present day Webster County. The 1850 Federal Census is the first census that lists the names of all the family members in a household as well as the specific ages. There are errors at times, but now there is considerably more information including names and ages of all. William is 56, Dorcas 53 and five of the known ten children are still in the household. Three sons and two daughters have gotten married and started their own families. All of the families are listed as farmers. Following in the next several years to 1858 are several more land purchases and sales. In 1853 William and Dorcas sell land for the third time to their sons, Ferdinand and Jacob, on the Tygarts Valley River. In 1854 William buys land from Washington and Margaret Long on the waters of Buckhannon and Sugar Creeks. On the west side of Randolph County going through present day Pickens is the Right Fork of the Buckhannon that runs north. A little to the south of Pickens going over Turkey Bone Mountain starts Sugar Creek which runs west into present day Webster County. Approximately 20 miles due west of Pickens is Hacker Valley in Webster County. In 1855 son John Henry buys land from the Longs and a couple named Thomas and Nancy Bradshaw. The land is only described as being in Randolph County on the west side of the Tygarts Valley River. It could be assumed that this is near the land his parents got from the Longs, although there is a Bradshaw Mountain to the south near the Pocahontas and Webster County borders in Randolph. Also, in 1853, John Henry received a land grant of 450 acres within the boundaries of Pocahontas County at the headwaters of the Tygarts Valley River. To this time, it appears, the Maces have purchased quite a bit of land in Randolph and Pocahontas Counties in at least three different spots. In September 1855 William and Dorcas buy back from John Henry the land purchased by William, John Henry and Josiah Bridger in 1848. The following month William and Dorcas buy back land from son Jacob and his wife Priscilla. This land borders land of John Henry. After this, in November 1855, William, Dorcas, son Ferdinand and his wife Judith sell land, which is in the same area as John Henry’s and the land recently sold by Jacob. November of 1856 John Henry and wife Rebecca sell land to John Crouch lying in both Pocahontas and Randolph Counties and sell land again in December to Daniel Kailor that lies in Randolph County on the west side of the Tygarts Valley River. September of 1857 William and Dorcas sell off more land lying at the headwaters of the Tygarts Valley River lying in both Randolph and Pocahontas Counties. This is most likely the last of their land in this area. between Sugar and Buckhannon Creeks on land running diagonally between Bee Knob and Turkeybone Mountain is where William and Dorcas also had land. It was purchased in 1853 and then sold in 1858 from Caldwell County, Missouri. I believe Catherine Mace’s husband, Samuel Smith, also had land in this area. During the year of 1857, possibly even 1856, and maybe into 1858 six of the ten children and their spouses depart for the state for Iowa. Three of the children stay behind for the rest of their lives and one, William Ebenezer, stays on the land formerly occupied by William and Dorcas. Another, daughter Mary Elizabeth, and her husband follow in 1864. By August of 1858 William and Dorcas are in Caldwell County, Missouri as evidenced by a land sale of the property purchased on Buckhannon River and Sugar Creek. Whether they went through Iowa and stayed is not known. From some dates of the births of children in the groups that left, it is known that some were born in Iowa in 1857. It is probable that they left in bunches and may have even met together for one last time in Iowa. That they split in Iowa is proven by censuses and future history. How long William and Dorcas stayed in Caldwell is not known, but long enough to conduct a land sale. It is probable that they set down something in the way of property ownership, because some of the family shows back up in Caldwell later. This is hard to know though, since the Caldwell County Courthouse and its records were burnt in 1860. According to a voter’s census William and Dorcas arrive in Linn County, Kansas in January 1859. With them are son Charles and his wife, daughters Catherine, Margaret and Christina. In addition are Dorcas Wamsley and her husband John Yeager Stalnaker. Dorcas is the daughter of William’s sister Sarah and John Yeager is the son of Dorcas’s brother Ferdinand. There is also a Sarah Stalnaker present in Linn County in 1859, but I do not know who she is for sure. Ferdinand Stalnaker had a wife Sarah and this may be her, though this particular Sarah finished her days back in Randolph County and if this is the same person, she is soon gone from Linn County. The families came into Linn County at different times. Margaret and her husband, Josiah Bridger, had been there since October 1858. John and Dorcas Stalnaker were also there in January and daughter Catherine and Sarah Stalnaker arrive in April of 1859. Things begin to go downhill soon after arrival in Linn County. William Mace and another individual, William Hollingshead, buy land in March 1859 from a W.W. Evans*. They put down $280 with promises to pay the rest. The documents involved are hard to read, but soon after the purchase both are sued for non-payment to W.W. Evans of $197. William Mace and William Hollingshead evidently counter sue saying that the other party did not hold up to their end of the deal. Possibly not delivering some promised deed or other document and one document claims that Evans destroyed some important piece of paper. As this begins to heat up, William Mace takes ill and long before the affair is over he is dead. In April William begins visiting a doctor, with several visits to follow all the way to August 7th, 1859. The bill and list of visits is included in the estate settlement as is the bill for a six-foot coffin in August. The coffin was six and a half foot long and cost $8. So after the 7th of August and before the end of the month William is dead of what might have been tuberculosis. In October 1859 Dorcas Wamsley Stalnaker dies of ‘dropsy’, which is some kind of fluid build up in the body, possibly the heart. William left a will and son Jacob, though never present, was the executor. The will is not on file in Linn County and the estate settlement said that Charles had it with him. Dorcas is not on the 1860 census and may have died just before the census taking. Also absent are Charles and Catherine. Margaret and husband Josiah are still here, as is John Yeager Stalnaker. A little to the northwest of the land that William would have owned is Showalter Cemetery. In the cemetery are three graves marked only with stones and these may be the graves of William and Dorcas with their niece Dorcas. John Yeager is killed in 1883 by a runaway wagon and is buried with other family members in Goodrich Cemetery, a cemetery to the north. Neither his wife Dorcas, nor any Maces are buried there. With the exception of Margaret Mace Bridger, the next place any of these Maces are found is back in Caldwell County, Missouri. Why the return I do not know. It could have been to get away from all of the legal problems encountered in Linn County or it could be that they had some land in Caldwell and maybe hadn’t intended to stay in Linn County. The above is a reference to the coffin bill in the estate papers of William Mace and another document in the estate papers said the following: That Charles or Dorcas Mace had the will and deeds of sale. This little document was sworn to by attorney John C. Noel and dated February 15, 1860. This last date probably means that Dorcas was still alive and the family was still in Linn County at this time. Another court document attached to the estate papers is a request by Charles Mace, dated February 14, 1860, to amend the estate papers to show that he is the actual owner of some of the personal estate property. As said before none of the Maces, but Margaret, were on the 1860 census. Will of William Mace The following is a transcription of the will of William Mace as gotten from Joseph Barrett of Roy, Utah. He came across a copy of the will while on a trip to West Virginia and my thoughts are that a copy of the original will had been in the possession of William Ebenezer Mace, most likely sent back from Linn County, Kansas by Charles and this copy was used as evidence to prove a land claim by William Ebenezer. Children of William and Dorcas: John Henry Mace: July 4th 1818-December 16th 1861. He married Rebecca Crouch, June 4th 1816-December 8th 1888, on August 3rd 1837. She was the daughter of Andrew Crouch and Dorcas’s sister Elizabeth Stalnaker. They were first cousins. They may have had as many as 15 children, but 12 are the more likely number of children. He lived most of his life on the Tygarts Valley River headwaters, but at about the time the Maces were picking up to leave the Valley he moved into present day Webster County at Hackers Valley. Not long after moving there he was killed in an ambush by “bushwhackers and robbers”. This may have been Civil War related with him being a Confederate soldier or sympathizer. One of his sons, Andrew, served in the Confederacy for most of the war and many of the people in that area joined the Confederate forces, including Andrew’s Crouch cousins. The only account I have of his death is from John Henry’s grandson and son of Andrew, Lee. "My father was a devoted Christian. He was shot and killed by bushwhackers and robbers two miles above Hackers Valley. One of the parties present said he died praying for his enemies, as he was not instantly killed, but lived a short time after he was shot." From Carl and Susan Mace of Hacker Valley, “he was killed while riding a horse along Jerry's Run, a nearby creek”. John Henry and Rebecca are both buried in Hacker Valley Cemetery, along with some of their children and other descendents. Catherine “Katie” Mace: 1819- She too grew up in the Tygarts Valley like the rest of her siblings. She may have been married as many as three times. The first was a James Arters and they had no children. The next was James Miles who was killed, possibly while digging a well. The third was Samuel Smith, born about 1816, who was the son of William Smith and Esther Pitman. She had three children by Miles and three by Smith that I know of. Katie’s first child by Smith was less than a year old in the 1850 census and her oldest child by Miles was nine. The March 1854 land deed for the land purchased by William and Dorcas near Pickens listed Samuel Smith as a neighbor. The next mention of Katie is in 1859 on the Linn County voter’s census. She is a widow at this time. The 1870 Caldwell County Federal Census shows a 12-year-old boy, Ferdinand Smith, born in Missouri meaning that Samuel Smith was still alive around 1858. Katie is next found in Caldwell County on the 1870 Federal Census living near brother Charles in New York Township. She is still in Caldwell County in 1876 where she is listed as a property owner in an atlas of the county. A letter written in 1889 from her brother William Ebenezer to his brother Jacob says “Katie is dead the girls are all dead but Margaret”. Jacob W. Mace: November 5th 1821-October 13th 1890. He married Priscilla Arbogast, 1822-1891, on November 22, 1844 and moved out of state with the rest of the clan. Just prior to that he was a farmer and a neighbor of his parents and siblings in the Mingo area of south Randolph County. When everyone arrived in Iowa he stayed and moved to Union Township in Boone County near Perry, Iowa. Jacob and Priscilla had twelve children and there are descendents still living and farming in the same area. Margaret See Mace: March 6th 1824-November 28th 1898. She married Josiah Bridger, October 15th 1821-March 24th 1891, on November 11, 1843. They left with the group for Iowa in about 1857 and followed on down to Linn County, Kansas. At least one child was born in Iowa on that trip. Prior to leaving they lived and farmed near the Mace lands. They stayed in Linn County, Kansas after the deaths of William and Dorcas. The 1870 Federal Census shows Josiah as a merchant in addition to farming. In 1878 they are on the tax lists of Albion Township, Cassia County, Iowa. I do not know the reason for leaving or exactly when they left, but this is where they stayed until their deaths. One story I heard was that they were on their way to Oregon when the wagon broke down. Ophelia Ann Mace: 1829-Between 1861 and 1865. Little is known of her. She married George Washington Cochran, born 1826, on July 11th 1852. William Price’s “SKETCHES OF POCAHONTAS COUNTY” mentions that they went to live on Stony Creek in Pocahontas County and died during the war, along with their seven-year-old son, John of diphtheria. Other sources also say they died during the war and diphtheria was the cause. I found another record of a daughter, Tabitha Jane, born in 1855 to George and Ophelia Cochran. Also, the 1860 Federal Census shows both George and Ophelia living with his parents. They have five-year-old Tabitha J. with them, but no son listed. If she died with the family I do not know. Where they are buried and when they died I do not know either. There is a Stony Creek near Edray in Pocahontas County, which is a little ways due south of Mace. William Ebenezer Mace: May 12th 1831-December 1st 1896. He is one of three who stayed in West Virginia and lived on or near the land vacated by William and Dorcas. He married Margaret Swecker, June 22nd 1835- May 13th 1926, on July 11th 1852. I do not know much of him. He is well documented by censuses and the family trees of others, but I have little biographical information on him. One story I found on him was in a little book, “TALES OF NORTHERN WEBSTER COUNTY” by Stanley Anderson. One of the sons of William’s brother John Henry was taken captive by Union troops after they got food at the farm in April 1862. Three men, James McCray, Elias Snyder, and William Ebenezer decided to get in front of the Yankees and each would kill one in an ambush. They set up the ambush, but the Yankees had gotten wind of their intentions and the trio were themselves surprised. The three jumped up and ran away as the Yankees began shooting at them. Elias Snyder got away unharmed, William Ebenezer was shot through the arm and escaped, but James McCray was hit in the leg and captured. McCray was then brought back to the ambush sight and killed with his own gun. A family descendent source mentions William as being a Confederate soldier, but to date I have found no record of his service. That he was a Confederate sympathizer is of no doubt and how he actually spent the war is unknown by me. Mary Elizabeth Mace: 1835-between 1873 and 1880. She married Absolum Stalnaker, 1822-to sometime after 1887, on October 7th 1850. She was 16 when she married and Absolum was 28 and this was another first cousin marriage. Absolum was the son of Dorcas’s brother Ferdinand and Sarah Yeager. They do not leave the state at the same time as the others and are still living in Randolph County in 1860 according to the Federal Census. According to “STALNAKER CHRONICLES” they move to Caldwell County in 1864. They are present on the 1870 Federal Census and living in Kingston Township. Mary Elizabeth is dead before 1880, as she is absent on the 1880 Federal Census and she has a daughter in 1872 or 1873. An 1887 court paper of Caldwell County shows son Lee suing for a new guardian as Absolum had long before quit being a father and the document mentions that his mother is no longer living. Sometime around 1894 Absolum and three sons, Ferdinand, Jasper and Lee are in Baca County, Colorado with Federal land grants. Absolum dies in 1896 and is buried in Springfield Cemetery. Charles S. Mace: March 17th 1836 to October 25th 1913. He married Margaret Gum, April 14th 1839 to July 15th 1924, January 20th 1857. In the 1910 census he has been married 54 years. He shows up on the 1859 Linn County, Kansas voters list and extensively in the legal papers that involved his father in 1859 and 1860. His first son, Jacob, is 13 in the 1870 Caldwell County Federal Census, and if true had to have been born by the earlier part of 1858, if not in 1857. The 1870 census also lists Charles oldest son as born in Missouri. William and Dorcas were conducting their land sale in August of 1858, which means they had stayed for at least a little while in Caldwell County before moving on to Kansas. There could be some problems with the ages on the census for the kids, because his next son, James, is listed as 11 years old and born in Missouri. It could also be that they were all on the move and he was born while on the way to Kansas. The 1859 voters list shows him with three dependents, one being his wife. He is on an 1864 tax list, 15th Sub-Dist-Davis Township, Caldwell County, Missouri. William H. Miles, son of Katie, is also there in another district of Elm and Grand River Townships, Caldwell County. Also, I find Charles listed on a post Civil War Enrollment list for the Missouri State Militia (no year given), 6th Cavalry, Company "E", 5th Battalion. He is listed as 31 (error), fair complexion with blue eyes, 5'10", married and a farmer in Davis Township of Caldwell County. I found this info on the Caldwell County web page. That he served in the Union Cavalry is interesting, considering the Southern sympathies of his home area (a little more on this under Ferdinand). In 1870 he is living in New York Township near his sister Catherine. By around 1875 he has moved to Lakin Township, Harvey County, in Kansas. In the 1880 Federal Census he has a four-year-old daughter, Senora, who is listed as born in Kansas. Between the 1870 and 1880 Federal Censuses, Charles and Margaret have nine children that were listed. In the 1889 letter cited earlier between William Ebenezer and Jacob, William says “I have not heard from Charley for a long time I don’t know where he is”. Knowing that all of the “girls” are dead, but Margaret, means that some kind of contact had been kept. For whatever reason Charles quits contact for good. In Lakin Township, Harvey County he again is a farmer and dies there in 1913 of a cerebral hemorrhage. In addition to the 1880 Federal Census the family is also on the 1910. The family is also on Kansas State censuses for 1875, 1885 and 1895. On the 1910 census he is 74 years of age and has three children still living with Margaret and himself. They are Grant, George and Martha, none of whom are married. Charles was the last surviving child of William and Dorcas. Four of Charles and Margaret’s ten children die before them and another dies before Margaret’s death in 1924. The following is a transcription of a letter from William Ebenezer Mace to his brother Jacob W. Mace in 1889. August 10, 1889 Split Rock, Pocahontas Co. W Va Dear Brother and Sister, I will try to answer your kind letter which came to hand some time ago I was glad to hear from you all once more but sorry to hear of Jacobs sickness this leaves us all tolerably well we have had the wettest summer here I ever saw we have hardly commenced to harvest yet are just done stacking what wheat was tolerably good was it good out there our corn crop is not very good on account of wet weather. How are you all getting along out there I would be glad to come out there and see you all if I could but I don’t know when I can come I think some of you might come out and see us some of these times you can come to within 40 miles of here on the car I have not heard from Charley for a long time I don’t know where he is most all of the old people are dead who was living here when you left old Mr Gustus Wood and Sam Lemon are still living yet Capt Marshall is living on our old place it don’t look like the same place it did when you was here. I have 10 children 5 married and 5 single our young boy is called Jacob he is about 9 year old. How is times out there times is very hard out here money scarce Cattle is very low Sheep is a tolerably good price horses very good price also. Calves are selling from 5 to 12 dollars each Katy is dead the girls are all dead but Margaret I want to come out some time to see you all tell the boys to come out and see me sometime they could have a fine time out here hunting I was able to go out and kill two deer last winter well I will close for this time write as soon as you get this from your brother give my love to all W. E Mace (Written on the same letter) Dear Uncle and Aunt I will try to write you a few lines I am the oldest boy Pa has at home I will be 21 the 15 of October if I live. I am going to try to come out and see you all some time tell the boys to write me as I would like to correspond with them and find out something about that country I was down to Uncle John Maces widow last fall she died about the first of November the boys all live in Webster Co and are doing very well. Well I close tell the boys to be sure and send me their pictures and I will get one taken for them. We got your pictures all right. Please write soon and send our letters to Split Rock Pocahontas Co W Va Yours Sincerely Seymore Mace Christina Ellen Mace: (Possibly Christenia,also the name on her gravestone). She is the last adult child, March 11, 1842-January 26th 1866. She married Gallatin W. Noblet (Noblit) on May 28th 1861 or possibly May 22nd 1862. She was his second of three wives. By name she first appears on the 1850 census as a male named Christian. She follows the clan to Missouri and Kansas and then returns again to Caldwell County, Missouri. She has only one child, a daughter named Cora and Christina probably died giving birth to her (Cora is born January 1866). She took up residence in Fairview Township and is buried in White Cemetery. Christina’s daughter Cora was raised by her half-sister Sonora and at the age of 16 Cora ran off with Sonora’s husband, Joseph Harrell. I think Charle’s daughter, Senora (sp?), was named after Sonora Noblit (I have seen the name spelled Noblitt also). Above is the marriage listing for Christina and Gallatin W. Noblit and to the right is the burial memorial to Christina, Gallatin and his two other wives. Each occupies a side to the stone. The graves are in the back north section of White Cemetery in Caldwell County, Missouri.

Sources not listed in document: -Ancestry.com WebPages -Caldwell County, Missouri GenWeb -Ruby Ely of Caldwell County, Missouri -Ola Mae Ernest of Linn County, Kansas -Family Tree Maker Software and WebPages -Genealogy Research Associates -GenWeb Archives -Halstead Library, Halstead, Kansas -Harvey County, Kansas Historical Society -Linn County, Kansas GenWeb -Pocahontas County, West Virginia GenWeb -Randolph County, West Virginia GenWeb -Rootsweb -Karen Walker of Caldwell County, Missouri


luvenajo1222added this on 14 Jul 2012 JGSwalloworiginally submitted this to SwallowFamily on 2 Jan 2009History of the Mace family that includes William Mace, Dorcus Stalnaker, Josiah Bridger, and Margaret See Mace Bridger.


http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/20397680/person/19374386881/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum



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