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Gwin Surname Misc Notes During My Search
Posted by: ann gallagher (ID *****8210) Date: October 23, 2012 at 21:16:52
  of 15

From Ann Gallagher - My Misc Notes..... Trying to locate any and all information on Peirce/Pearce Gwin

All of my misc notes are from Anesrty, Family Search, Genforum Message boards, and other misc. web pages.
Guynn, Guin, Gynn, Gewin, Gynne, Guen, Gynn, Guine, Guevin
also look at the Wynn Surname.

You all may be a little right on the Guin name. According to records and Jesse Blaine Gwin's book, he has done a good job of research. The Gwin's and the Wynne's are related and have common ancestors. The name started well before 1611, as 'Media Research','Bardsley English Surnames','Americans of Gentle Birth','Colonial &

Revolutionary Lineages', and other researches state. Here is the line from long ago to the 1600's: 1-Cunedda @480 AD, 2-Enion Yrth, 3-Cadwallon, 4-Maelgwn @547 Cwynedd, 5-Rhun, 6-Beli, 7-Iago, 8-Cadfan, 9-Cadwallon, 10-Cadwaladr, 11-Idwal, 12-Rhodri Molwynog 754, 13-Cyan, 14-Gwriad, 15-Merfyn Frych, 16-Rhodri Mawr, 17-Anarawd 916, 18-Idwal Foel, 19-Meurig, 20-Idwal, 21-Iago 1039, 22-Cynan, 23-Gruffydd, 24-Owain Gwynedd 1137,25-Irwerth Drwyndwn, 26-Llywelyn, 27-Gwaithvood, 28-Convyn Blythin, 29-Cadowgan, 30-Madoc, 31-Rhiwallon, 32-Dophin, 33-Cynveln, 34-Einion, 35-Meredith, 36-Griffith, 37-Adda, 38-Howell, 39-Ithel, 40-John Gwyn, 41-Evan, 42-Howell, 43-Edward, 44-Reginald, 45-Robert Gwyn, 46-John Gwyn 1600's. Peter Wynne(Gwyn) came to Jamestown, 1608. (Guinn's). They came to America and changed the name to Gwin, Guin, Wynn, Gwynn, Guinn, Gwynne,etc.

BOOK Visitations of Norfolk, 1563 and 1613 - Ancestry.com. Visitations of Norfolk, 1563 and 1613 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004. Original data: Rye, Walter, ed. The Visitacion [sic] of Norfolk, Made and Taken by William Hervey, Clarencieux King of Arms, Anno 1563, Enlarge with Another Visitacion [sic] made by Clarenceux Cooke, With Many Other Descents; and also the Vissitation [sic] Made by John Raven, Richmond, Anno 1613. London, England: n.p., 1891

BOOK - The peopling of Virginia by R. Bennett Bean
England 1591

Gwin, doctor, presentation Oct 1591 Book: 1591. Collection: England: - Index To Bills of Provy Signet (Signet Bills), 1584-1596 & 1603-1624; Writs of Privy Seal, 1600-1603

1599
04 Jul 1599 Humfrey Wynne, alias Hankin bur. Book: The Register of the Parish Church of Sidbury. Anno Dni m.d.l.x. Collection: Shropshire: Shipton, Ford, Hughley, Hanwood, Wolstaston, Tasley, Sidbury - Parish Registers, Hereford Diocese

1605
Gwyn, Humfrie, - m.a. 1605 Book: Burials. (Burial) Collection: Devon & Cornwall: - Wills and Administrations Proved in The Bishop of Exeter, 1559-1799 UK, Extracted Probate Records

1608 Virginia
Peter Wynne Year: 1608 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 4916 Primary Immigrant: Wynne, Peter Annotation: Date and port of arrival or date and place of mention. Place of origin, name of ship, name of spouse and children, occupation, living conditions, ownership of land, dates and circumstances of death, and other historical information may also be provided. Source Bibliography: MCCARTNEY, MARTHA W. Virginia Immigrants and Adventurers 1607-1635: A Biographical Dictionary. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2007. Page: 770

Virginia 1607
Peter, Captain Wynne State: VA County: Virginia Colony Township: Virginia Year: 1607 Database: VA Early Census Index

1610
The wife of this Caradoc was a daughter of Gwynn ap Colwyn, son of the Prince of South Wales. One of the descendants of this Chieftain Owen Gwinedd (Owen Gwynn) was one of the largest contributors to the sustenance of the Colony. In 1610, Captain Owen Gwinn is in the list of "lords, esquires and gentlemen," who came to America under the third charter, in 1611. He was the son of Sir John Winn (1523-1626) of the Winn family of Gwydin, by his wife Sidney, daughter of William Girrard. At the death of his elder brother, Sir Richard Wynn, bart., of Gwydin, in 1649, this Owen Gwynn, who had been knighted, succeeded to the baronetcy. He married Grace, daughter of Hugh Williams. Their son, Hugh Gwynn, represented Gloucester, in the House of Burgesses, 1652-90, and was prominent as a vestryman, 1652-77, with Gwynn Reade, Captain Thomas Smith, and others.

Virginia 1618
Hugh Gwynn Birth Date: 1618 Age at Death: 81 Death Date: 1699 Burial Place: Gwynn, Mathews County, Virginia, USA www.findagrave.com
England 1623

Pearce Gwin
England, Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 spouse: Margaret ? child: Humfrey Gwin male baptism/christening date: 15 Feb 1623 baptism/christening place: St Mary Whitechapel, Stepney, London England Father Pearce Gwin Mother Margaret batch number Co2557-1 system origin england-odm source film number 94691 - FamilySearch On line.

Humfrey Gwin Baptism Date: 15 Feb 1623 Parish: St Mary, Whitechapel County: Middlesex Borough: Tower Hamlets Parent(s): Pearce Gwin, Mappret Gwin Record Type: Baptism Register Type: Parish Register Source Ancestry.com - Source Citation: London Metropolitan Archives, Saint Mary, Whitechapel, Composite register: baptisms Nov 1558 - Oct 1645 (gap 1618-1621) and Aug - Nov 1860, marriages Dec 1558 - Feb 1642 (gap 1619-1621), burials Nov 1558 - Jun 1642 (gap 1619-1621), P93/MRY1, Item 001.

Virginia 1639
Hugh Gwyn was an early settler in Charles River county, subsequently York county. He was a justice from 1641, and a burgess for York in 1639 and 1646. He patented lands at the mouth of the Pyanketank river in 1642 and removed to that region, and in 1652 was one of the two first burgesses for the new county of Gloucester. He died about 1654, and Gwyn's Island perpetuates his name. He left issue. Name: Hugh Gwyn Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I -IV--Burgesses and Other Prominent Persons
       
SC
R. P. Wynn Spouse: Mary E. Harper Marriage Date: 1773-1865 Source: Marriage and Death Notices, Southern Christian Advocate

1666
Lawrence Smith, of York, and John Smith, of Gloucester, were cotemporaneous, and probably brothers, as we have on record a deed of land in Gloucester Co., by Lawrence Smith, to "his brother, John Smith, of that county," in 1666.

Virginia 1672
Rev. John Gwyn was a cavalier minister, who came to Virginia during Cromwell's time. In 1672 he was rector of Ware parish, Gloucester county, and of Abington in 1674 and 1680. His son, Edmund Gwyn, of Gloucester county, who an old record says was "a regular Doctor of Physics," married Lucy Bernard, daughter of Colonel William Bernard, of the council ("Virginia Magazine," iv, 204; "William and Mary Quarterly," xviii, 60-62). Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I -IV--Burgesses and Other Prominent Persons       

South Carolina
Lewis Guin Year: 1670-1700 Place: South Carolina Source Publication Code: 248.10 Primary Immigrant: Guin, Lewis Annotation: Date and port of arrival. Occupation and key to sources, which are listed on pp. xi-xii, are also provided; name of ship may also be provided. Source Bibliography: BALDWIN, AGNES LELAND. First Settlers of South Carolina 1670-1700. Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1985. 268p. Page: 110

Virginia 1678
Peter Wynne Birth 1678 in Virginia, Colonies Death Living Death 1700, or after in Colonies parents Joshua Wynne, Mary Jones (f) Spouse: Frances Harrison Hamblin (f)

Virginia 1702
Hugh Gwyn SAR Membership: 96191 Birth Date: 1702 Birth Place: Virginia Death Date: 1768 Death Place: Virginia Father: John Gevine Gwyn Spouse: Peyton Humphrey Children: Richard Gwyn

Virginia Immigrant 1714
Peter Gwynn Year: 1714 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 6223 Primary Immigrant: Gwynn, Peter Annotation: Abstracts of Virginia Land Office patent books 9 through 14, covering the early decades of the eighteenth century. Includes numerous references to land patented by "French refugees," the Protestants (Huguenots) who fled France after Louis XIV revoked the Source Bibliography: NUGENT, NELL MARION, abstractor. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants. Vol. 3: 1695-1732. Richmond [VA]: Virginia State Library, 1979. 578p. Indexed. Page: 141

Boston 1715
Mary Guwin Event Type: Death Event City: Boston Death Date: 31 Mar 1715 Father Name: William Guwin Mother Name: Mary Guwin

Not Indentured Servant - Virginia
At age 25 he was commissioned to transport 18 indentured servants to America. They arrived in the Colony of Virginia in 1688. He was granted 900 acres of land on 26 Apr 1704 in Nansemonde County, Virginia. He sold this land about 1731 and moved to Edgecombe County, North Carolina, where he owned land as late as 1739. He and Mary had five sons.
He was born befor 1662. He was a witness at a Quaker wedding in Nansemonde, Virginia, in 1688. He was on the 1704 tax list of Nansemonde and also in 1719-1725." from email correspondence with Janie Webb Spencer of Arlington, Texas, by William D. Lollar (lollar @gmail.com)
Children of Christopher Columbus Gewin and Mary Harrell are:
+Thomas Gewin, b. Abt. 1707, Nansemonde County, Virginia, d. Aft. 1761, Virginia.
Christopher Columbus Gewin, b. Bef. 1683, Nansemond, Virginia, d. date unknown.
Moses Gewin, b. Abt. 1707, Nansemond, Virginia, d. date unknown.
David Gewin, b. 1719, d. date unknown.
William Gewin, d. date unknown.

Virginia 1696
Gwinn Date: 5 Feb 1696 Location: Norfolk Co., VA Notes: This probate record was extracted from microfilmed copies of the original Will Book. Remarks: --- Gwinn. Book 6 f. 193. (folio taken from Index). Dated 5 Feb. 1696. Proved 15 ---(torn)--- May 1700 (taken from conveyances on same folio). . . . the plantation whereon I l---(torn)--- . . . halfe the Orchard and ---(torn)--- Sd wife the one ha Description: Testator Book date: 6-193 Prove date: 15 May

1700
Alexander Gwinn Date: 5 Feb 1696 Location: Norfolk Co., VA Notes: This probate record was extracted from microfilmed copies of the original Will Book. Remarks: --- Gwinn. Book 6 f. 193. (folio taken from Index). Dated 5 Feb. 1696. Proved 15 ---(torn)--- May 1700 (taken from conveyances on same folio). . . . the plantation whereon I l---(torn)--- . . . halfe the Orchard and ---(torn)--- Sd wife the one ha Description: Grandson Book date: 6-193 Prove date: 15

May 1700
William Gwinn Date: 5 Feb 1696 Location: Norfolk Co., VA Notes: This probate record was extracted from microfilmed copies of the original Will Book. Remarks: --- Gwinn. Book 6 f. 193. (folio taken from Index). Dated 5 Feb. 1696. Proved 15 ---(torn)--- May 1700 (taken from conveyances on same folio). . . . the plantation whereon I l---(torn)--- . . . halfe the Orchard and ---(torn)--- Sd wife the one ha Description: Son Book date: 6-193 Prove date: 15 May 1700

Virginia 1698
John Wynn Year: 1698 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 9151 Primary Immigrant: Wynn, John Annotation: Contains 35 articles excerpted from The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1847-1961. About 17,000 names. Similar lists in Boyer, nos. 0702, 0714, 0717, 0720. Source Bibliography: TEPPER, MICHAEL, editor. Passengers to America: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists from "The New England Historical and Genealogical Register." Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1977. 554p. Reprinted with new introduction and indexes, 1978. Repr. 1980. Page: 181

Liverpool to Virginia 1698
John Wynn Year: 1698 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 2212 Primary Immigrant: Wynn, John Annotation: Date of emigration with intended destination. Originally appeared in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, vols. 64-65. Also in source no. 9151, pp. 173-220 (indexed in PILI, first edition). Source Bibliography: FRENCH, ELIZABETH. List of Emigrants to America from Liverpool, 1697-1707. Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1913. 55p. Reprint. Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1962, 1983. Page: 11

Virginia 1700
Etienne Guevin Year: 1700 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 720 Primary Immigrant: Guevin, Etienne Annotation: Contains passenger lists mentioned in Lancour, A Bibliography of Ship Passenger Lists, 1538-1825 (1963), nos. 198E, 200-207, 208(1), 213, 215, 219, 220, 222, 225, 227, 229-231, 232A-233, 235-237, 240(1)-243. Boyer has indexed ship names, place names, and about 12,000 personal names, with variant surname spellings. Nos. 9120, 9135, 9143, 9144, and 9151, Tepper's works, have similar lists. Source Bibliography: BOYER, CARL, 3RD, editor Ship Passenger Lists, the South (1538-1825). Newhall, CA: the editor, 1979. 314p. 4th pr. 1986. Reprint. Family Line Publications, Westminster, MD, 1992. Page: 88
Report of the Virginia governor on the French refugees,

1700
Gov. Francis Nicholson submitted his report to English Board of Trade in August 1700. “they would be strengthing to the Frontiers and would quickly make a settlement” The 24th of the last month, I had the good Fortune of receiving his Majesty’s Royal Commands of March the 18th [1700], sent me by your Lordship, concerning the Marquis de la Muce, Mons’r [Monsieur] de Sailly, and other French Protestant Refugees; and I beg leave to assure your Lordship that as I have, so I will endeavor to obey them (they were on board the ship Mary and Ann, of London, George Haws, Commander, who had about 13 weeks passage , and the 23rd of the last month arrived at the mouth of this River), and upon receipt of them, I immediately went down to Kickotan to give directions in order to their coming hither, some of whom Came on Sunday in the evening, the rest of the next day. I wrote to Col. Byrd and Col. Harrison to meet them here, which they did, and we concluded that there was no settling them in Norfolk nor thereabouts, because esteemed an unhealthful place, and no vacant land, except some that is in dispute now betwixt us and No. Carolina: So we thought it would be best for them to go to a place about twenty miles above the Falls of James River, commonly called the Manikin Town. There is a great deal of good Land and unpatented, where they may at present be all together, which we thought would be best for all his Majesty’s Service and Interests, and that they would be strengthing to the Frontiers and would quickly make a settlement, not only for themselves, but to receive others when his majesty shall be graciously pleased to send them. They may be prejudicial to his Majesty’s interest and Service, vizt. [such as], by living long together and using their own language and customs, and by going upon such manufactures and handicraft Trades as we are furnished with from England; but according to duty, I shall endeavor to regulate these affairs, and when, please God, the Council meets, I shall lay before them the matters relating to these Refugees. On Tuesday I mustered them, and No. 1 [first of several enclosures with the report] is a copy of the List of them. Col. Byrd went before them in order to meet them at the Falls of this River, where he formerly lived, to dispose of them thereabouts, till they can get houses or sheds in the place for their Reception, and he promised to go along with the Marquis and Mons’r de Sailly to show them the Land.
The people [current residents] at present seem to be very well affected towards them, and to commiserate their condition, and some who have seen them have given them money, viz: Col. Harrison, 5£; Mr. Commissary Blaire, the like Sum. The Reverend Mr. Stephen Touaie, thereabouts; Mr. Benjamin Harrison, 5£; Mr. Attorney General Fowler, something, as likewise Mr. William Edwards, Merchant of this place. I am apt to think that Several Gentlemen and others will be charitable to them. They went from hence yesterday.
If his majesty be graciously pleased to send over more, I humbly propose that Mr. Micajah Perry, merchant of London, may be spoken with about their passage hither, and that they may have their passage on board the Ships which come to the upper parts of James River, which is the nighest place to their settlement, and that there may not above 40 or 50 come in any one Ship: So they may be better accommodated in all respects, for I have observed that when Ships that come into these parts, are crowded with people, ’tis very prejudicial to their health; some getting sicknesses, which not seldom prove catching, some die on board, and others soon after that come on shore. Your Lordship’s dutiful and faithful humble servant. FRS. NICHOLSON.

Huguenot Settlers in North America and Europe
Communication From Governor Francis Nicholson Of Virginia To the British Lords of Trade Concerning the Huguenot Settlement With "List of Ye Refugees," August 12th, 1700. Page 250 Communication From Governor Francis Nicholson of Virginia VIRGINIA, JAMES CITY, August 12, 1700.{86} P. R. O. Am. & W. Ind. May it please Yo'r Lordp.: No. 638. [extract.] The 24th of the last month, I had the good Fortune of receiving his Ma'y's Royal Commands of March ye 18th, 1 699/700, sent me by yo'r Lord'p, concerning the Marquis de la Muce, Mons'r de Sailly, and other French Protestant Refugees; and I beg leave to assure yo'r Lord'p, that as I have, so I will endeavor to obey them (they were on board the ship Mary and Ann, of London, George Haws, Commander, who had about 13 weeks passage, and the 23d of the last month arrived at the mouth of this River), and upon receipt of them, I immediately went down to Kickotan, to give directions in order to their coming hither, some of wh. came on Sunday in the evening, the rest the next day. I wrote to Colo. Byrd and Colo. Harrison to meet them here, w'ch they did, and we concluded that there was {86} Kindly communicated to the editor by W. Noel Sainsbury, Esq., of the Public Record Office, London, England. The list of the refugees subjoined presents some names not given in the lists included in Documents relating to the Huguenot Emigration to Virginia, Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, New Series, Vol. V. Page 251 no settling them in Norfolk nor thereabouts, because esteemed an unhealthfull place, and no vacant land, except some that is in dispute now betwixt us and No. Carolina: So we thought it would be best for them to go to a place about twenty miles above the Falls of James River, commonly called the Manikin Town. There is a great deal of good Land and unpatented, where they may at present be all together, w'ch we thought would be best for his Ma'ty's Service and Interests, and that they would be astrengthing to the Frontiers, and would quickly make a settlement, not only for themselves, but to receive others when his majesty shall be graciously pleased to send them. They may be prejudicial to his Ma'ty's interest and Service, vizt., by living long together, and using their own language and customs, and by going upon such manufactures, and handicraft Trades, as we are furnished with from England; but according to duty, I shall endeavour to regulate these affairs, and when, please God, the Council meets, I shall lay before them the matters relating to these Refugees. On Tuesday I mustered them, and No. 1 is a copy of the List of them. Colo. Byrd went before them in order to meet them at the Falls of this River, where he formerly lived, to dispose of them thereabouts, till they can gett housses or sheds in the place for their Reception, and he promised to go along with the Marquis and Mons'r de Sailly to show them the Land. The people at present seem to be very well affected towards them, and to commiserate their condition, and some who have seen them have given them money, viz: Colo. Harrison, 5£; Mr. Commissary Blair, the like Sum. The Reverend Mr. Stephen Touaie, thereabouts; Mr. Benjamin Harrison, 5£; Mr.
Attorney General Fowler, something, as likewise Mr. William Edwards, Merchant of this place. I am apt to think that Several Gentlemen and others will be charitable to them. They went from hence yesterday. If his majesty be graciously pleased to send over more, I humbly propose that Mr. Micajah Perry, merchant of London, may be spoken with about their passage hither, and that they may have their passage on board the Ships which come to the upper parts of James River, w'ch is the nighest place to their settlement, and that there may not above 40 or 50 come in any one Ship: So they may be better accommodated in all respects, for I have observed that when Ships that come into these parts, Page 252 are crowded with people, 'tis very prejudicial to their health; some getting sicknesses, w'ch not seldom prove catching, some dy on board, and others soon after they come on shore. Your Lord'ps' dutifull and faithfull humble servant. FFRS. NICHOLSON.Endorsement. The Gov'r of Virginia. 2 Aug., 1700. R. 21 Octob. Accounts of proceedings there, &c. List of Ye Refugees. ---Pierre Delome, et sa femme. - Marguerite Sene, et sa fille. - Magdalaine Mertle, Jean Vidau. - Tertulien - Sehult, et sa femme et deux enfants. - Pierre Lauret, Jean Roger. - Pierre Chastain, sa femme et cinq enfants. - Philippe Duvivier. - Pierre Nace, sa femme et Leur deux filles. - Francois Clere, Symon Sardin. - Soubragon, et Jacques Nicolay. - Pierre du Loy, Abraham Nicod. - Pierre Mallet, Francoise Coupet. - Jean Oger, sa femme et trois enfants. - Jean Saye, Elizabet Angeliere. - Jean et Claude Mallefant, avec leur mere. - Isaac Chabanas, sou fils, et Catharine Bomard. - Estienne Chastain, Adam Vignes. - Jean Menager et Jean Lesnard. - Estienne Badouet, Pierre Morriset. - Jedron Chamboux, et sa femme. - Jean Farry et. Jerome Dumas. - Joseph Bourgoian, David Bernard. - Jean Chevas, et sa femme. - Jean Tardieu, Jean Moreau. Page 253 Jaques Roy, et sa femme. - Abraham Sablet, et des deux enfants. - Quintin Chastatain et Michael Roux. - Jean Quictet, sa femme et trois enfants. - Henry Cabanis, sa femme et un enfant. - Jaques - Sayte, Jean Boisson. - Francois Bosse, Jean Fouchie. - Francoise Sassin, Andre Cochet. - Jean Gaury, sa femme et un enfant. - Pierre Gaury, sa femme et un enfant. - Jaques Hulyre, sa femme et quatre enfants. - Pierre Perrut, et sa femme. - Isaac Panetier, Jean Parransos, sa seur. - Elie Tremson, sa femme, Elizabet Tignac. - Antoine Trouillard, Jean Bourru et Jean Bouchet. - Jaques Voyes, Elizabet Mingot. - Catharine Godwal, Pierre la Courru. - Jean et Michell Cautepie, sa femme et deux enfants. - Jaques Broret, sa femme et deux enfants. - Abraham Moulin et sa femme. - Francois Billot, Pierre Comte (?). (Etienne Guevin), Rene Massoneau. - Francois du Tartre, Isaac Verry. - Jean Parmentier, David Thonitier et sa femme. - Moyse Lewreau, Pierre Tillou. - Marie Levesque, Jean Constantin. - Claud Bardon, sa femme. - Jean Imbert et sa femme. - Elizabet Fleury, Loys du Pyn. - Jaques Richard, et sa femme. - Adam et Marie Prevost. - Jaques Viras, et sa femme. - Jaques Brousse, sou enfant. - Pierre Cornu, Louiss Bon. - Isaac Fordet, - Jean Pepre. - Jean Gaillard et son fils. - Anthonie Matton, et sa femme. - Jean Lucadou, et sa femme. - Louiss Orange, sa femme et un enfant. - Daniel Taure, et deux enfants. Page 254 Pierre Cupper, - Daniel Roy, - Magdelain Gigou. - Pierre Grelet, - Jean Jovany, sa femme, deux enfants. - Pierre Ferrier, sa femme, un enfant. - La vefve faure et quatre enfants. - Isaac Arnaud, et sa femme. - Pierre Chatanier, sa femme et son pere. - Jean Fonasse, Jaques Bibbeau, Jean March. - Catharine Billot, Marie et Symon Jourdon. - Abraham Menot, Timothy Moul, sa femme, un enfant. - Jean Savin, sa femme, un enfant. - Jean Sargeaton, sa femme, un enfant. - Claude Philipe et sa femme. - Gabriel Sturter, Pierre de Corne. - Helen Trubyer. ---------- 59 femmes ou filles. 38 enfants. 108 hommes. Messrs. De la Muce ----------- et de Sailly fout en 205 personnes. tout 207 personnes. VIRGINIA : James Town, July 31, 1700. This is a true Copy. OLIVIER DE LA MUCE. CH. DE SAILLY. Received of ye hon'ble Marquis de la Muce and Chas. de la Sailly, ye summe of nine hundred, fourty-five pounds in full for ye passage of two hundred and five people aboord ye ship Mary Ann, bound for Virginia, I say receiv'd this 19th April, 1700. £945. GEO. HAWES. Witness: ALEXANDER CLEERE. VIRGINIA: James City, July 31, 1700. This is a true Copy. OLIVIER DE LA MUCE. CH DE SAILLY. This is a true copy, the original being in the Custody of-- (Signed,) FFRS. NICHOLSON.

MANAKIN TOWN The French Huguenot Settlement in Virginia 1700-ca. 1750 Many French Huguenots (Protestants), fleeing religious persecution in Catho-lic France, emigrated to America via England, which granted them tracts of frontier land to settle. One such settle-ment was Manakin Town in Virginia, created in 1700 on the James River near present-day Richmond. From about 400 original settlers, the town had fewer than 150 by 1705, as the newcomers went to live on their farms instead of the town, and as their chil-dren became assimilated into the English culture. By 1750 the town no longer existed. Presented here are four documents that illustrate the hardships and successes of Manakin Town’s first years. Petition of the French refugees to the governor of Virginia, 1700 requesting aid and supplies for the new arrivals (excerpts) “the most deplorable condition of the French Refugees now under your protection” This humble supplication, by underwritten petitioners, in the name and behalf of all the French Refugees arrived in Virginia, along with Monsieur De Joux, as also in the behalf of the greater part of the French Refugees who Landed here both before and since to settle themselves in a Colony — Showeth . . . That whereas the King’s most Excellent Majesty, out of his gracious good will and pleasure, hath granted the French Refugees a Liberty to Settle a Colony in Virginia, His Majesty for the encouragement of that design hath given Three thousand pounds Sterling to defray the charges of 500 persons in crossing the seas and to relieve their own necessities. In compliance with his Majesty’s Order, the Marquis de la Muce, and Monsieur De Sailly and several other French Refugees, to the number of about 200 persons, embarked themselves last April for Virginia, publishing and giving out that they sailed thither to put themselves in a capacity to receive such of their brethren as should afterwards imitate their Example . . . . About two months after the first embarkment, there departed a second [ship], bound to the same place, consisting of about 150 Refugees, among whom was Monsieur De Joux, sent along with them to exercise his pastoral function as Minister of all the said Colony, and who for that end was admitted into holy orders by my Lord Bishop of London National Humanities Center, 2008: nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds. (1-3) Petition, Nicholson report, and Byrd description in R. A. Brock, Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration to Virginia . . . (Richmond,

Virginia, 1886; reprint by Genealogical Publ. Co., 1962/66/73/79/ 95/98); permission pending. (4) Michel description in William J. Hinke, ed., trans., “Report of the Journey of Francis Louis Michel from Berne, Switzer-land, to Virginia, October 2, 1701–December 1, 1702,” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, 24:1-2 (January/April 1916), pp. 122-124. Spelling and punctuation modernized, and some paragraphing added by NHC for clarity. Complete image credits at nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/ becomingamer / imagecredits. htm. your Excellency received the first party in letting them feel the effects of your bounty and generosity so many way, and particularly in alloting them for their settlement one of the best tracts of land in the whole country, but to which there is no passing by water, as being 25 miles at least above the falls of James River. But so far was the second party of French Refugees from receiving that aid and assistance, they proposed to themselves from the first, that on the contrary it was no small surprise there to understand that more than one half of the first party lay sick at the falls [on the James River], languishing under misery and want, notwithstanding the considerable supplies that the Sieurs De la Muce and De Sailly received, both from your Excellency and from the Country, as also that a great number of ’em was dead, and that so many of ’em as repaired [departed] to their new settlement were in a distressed condition and in great disorder, complaining of the hard-heartedness of De Sailly, and speaking of him as of one whose conduct was odious and insupportable. It was a considerable surprise that instead of seeing this second party kindly received by Mr. De Sailly, and admitted to have a share in those charitable supplies he had in his hands and in those he had received from the country, his answer, on the contrary, to such as addressed him for relief was, That he had no bread nor sustenance for ’em. Nay, further, he opposed those who desired to take up such tracts of land as were adjacent to the Lands he had marked out for those of his first party, unless they would swear an oath of fidelity to such particular persons as he had made Justices of the Peace, which oaths those of the second party refused to take, being fully persuaded they lay under no obligation so to do. Being, therefore, destitute of all hopes of obtaining provision and relief from Mon’r De Sailly, they hindered Monsieur De Joux in his design [plan] of delivering up into the hands of De Sailly those goods with which Messieurs Jaquean, Belet and their company entrusted him. And having had sufficient trial of the said Mons[ieur] De Joux’s integrity and affection towards them, they requested him to use his utmost care and diligence in procuring some sustenance for ’em and some lands, which they might labor, sow and improve in hopes that God’s blessing upon their endeavors may give ’em some subsistence for the future without being burdensome to the country And this what the said De Joux has done with so much success by his mediation with those magistrates that ruled the country in your Excellency’s absence, that we have had such supplies as have almost hitherto relieved our necessities. At the same time the said De Joux has, by your Excellency’s permission, and to our common satisfaction, shared out among us the Lands we are now clearing, in order to our future subsistence. For these, and several other weighty considerations, we humbly supplicate and Petition your Excellency, not only in our own behalf, but also in the behalf of the French refugees that arrived here first along with the Sieurs De la Muce and De Sailly, and in the behalf of the third Party that arrived last of all, and are now dispersed about Jamestown, to grant us these following articles: 1st. That it may please your Excellency, in continuing your charitable disposition towards your Petitioners, to be instrumental in procuring food and sustenance for them, with other things necessary for their subsistence, till they are in capacity to live by the fruits of their own labors. 2d. And because that tract of Land your Excellency allotted to the French Refugees is so remote from the English plantation [settlement], and that there is no carrying of things by water, Your Petitioners being likewise destitute of all necessaries for transporting things by land, and being otherwise unable to attend such postages without neglecting their other labors more than one-half of the year, they do therefore petition your Excellency to order that such supplies as you will procure for their said subsistence may be carried and transported gratis [free] to the hithermost frontiers of their plantations. 3d. And being that your petitioners can have no prospect of any good livelihood in planting of tobacco, and that they cannot expect to be able in a short time to drive a trade in wings, flax, Silk and hemp, and other effects of their industry, which they aim at, and which cannot turn to any good account till after some years are past, during which they will want many things necessary for their comfortable living, They therefore petition your Excellency to use your interest with the King’s Majesty in procuring some encouragements for their labors, and in endeavoring to obtain of his Majesty, for some years at least, a comfortable subsistence for the Ministry among them. 4th. They it may please your Excellency to order Monsieur De Sailly to disburse to the above mentioned Colony the sum of Thirty Pounds Sterling out of the 230£ Sterling designed for the building of a church, without ornaments, a house for the Minister and a magazine [storehouse] to lay up fresh goods in, as shall be found to belong to the said Colony in Common till it is in a condition to build a decent and convenient church. That the said 30 Pounds be paid down by Monsieur De Sailly to Monsieur Do Joux for the said purpose. That the said Church be built in such a place as Monsieur de Joux shall think proper and convenient for the exercise of his ministerial function. 5th. And because the said Monsieur De Sailly (though he has in his custody all the money that has been given to the Colony for its subsistence), has refused to afford it any further relief or sustenance, under pretense that he hath no more money, not excepting so much as the above sum of 230£ Sterling, designed for the building of the Church. Therefore your petitioners do beseech your Excellency to order that the said De Sailly may, as soon as possible, give an account before such auditors as your Excellency shall nominate, how he has employed and laid out all the money he has received, as well in London as in this Government, for the use of the said Colony. 6th. That the remaining sum which Monsieur De Sailly shall be found indebted in after he has made up his account, whether it be in money or goods, may be deposited in the hands of your Excellency, or of such Commissioners as your Excellency shall make choice of, that so it may be preserved for the supplying of the urgent necessities of the Colony. 7th. It being impossible to keep the said Colony in any good order without Magistrates, as being at too long a distance from the English to receive necessary justice from them, the said Colony doth therefore petition your Excellency to give them liberty to choose such a number of Judges for a time, at least, as shall be thought necessary for determining all Civil causes, and that the said Judges be chosen by the people out of the number of those whose catalogue shall be presented by Monsieur De Joux. That the Judgments which shall be passed by the said Judges in Civil causes may be liable to an appeal to the courts next adjacent to the Manakin Town, excepting when the sum in controversy doth not exceed three pounds sterling. 8th. To prevent the dissolution of the said Colony, your petitioners do beseech your Excellency to give strict order to the English to entertain none of the French without permission, and that such French as shall desert their new settlement be ordered to restore the 5£ Sterling paid for their passage, as also the goods which they received and belong to say Colony. 9th. That Monsieur La Sosée, physician to the said Colony, be ordered to return again thither and carry back with him all the medecins and instruments that the Colony had entrusted him with. Your Petitioners do most humbly supplicate your Excellency to take into your serious consideration the most deplorable condition of the French Refugees now under your protection, and to grant them the above mentioned favors, and such other reliefs as your Excellency out of your singular goodness shall thing fit to bestow upon them. And they will always pray to God for the preservation of your person and for the prosperity and glory of your government. - D. Bleüet - Francois Gannard - Ettienne Chabran - Michael Michell - Jacque Corbelose - Jean Levillanà - LaBarr Eabuyt - Jean Arnaut - P. Zossard - Jean Aboàsson - Abraham Foy - J. Hagault - N. Mare - Théodore Duronsau - Francois Delhapiel - Josue Petit - David Menetres - Pierre Rivers - P. Labady - Jean Rugon - Daulegre - Jean Riviol - Paul Caftes - Elie Gullature - Souan - Jean Mearyut - Moise Verrüeil - Poussite - P. Baudry, p. - Pierre Leluells - Brault - S. Augustin - Anthoine de Ramberge - L. Robàll - Jacob Capon --------

From the National Humaniies Center. Documents 1700 -1702 of Manakin Town, the French Huguenot setlement in VA.
Pierre Morrisette On the 2nd of May 1700, after a cruel journey of 13 weeks the “Mary and Anne” weighed anchor in the mouth of the James River close to Hampton. The refugees, however, did not disembark. The original plan was to settle them south of present day Norfolk which at times was claimed by both the Virginia and Carolina Companies. For that reason, the Virginia Colonial Governor decided to resettle them 25 miles above the falls (Richmond area) on the James River. This site was not in dispute and it would have been easier for the governor to continue to provide English aid to the refugees, there. The site chosen was an abandoned Indian village. This site already had cleared land for cultivation. Small trees had started to reclaim the fields. It did not take great effort to remove these trees and sew their crops. The site came to be called Manikintown (spelled variously over the centuries). The origin of this name is from the confederation of Indian tribes that had been forced out of the area. They were known as The Monacans whose chief was named Powhatan who was the father of Pocahontas. Peter was manifested on “Ye List of French Refugees at Manikin Towne, in the Douglas Register, 23 Jul 1700”. Another 389 immigrants were reported to live in Manikintown that year.

Virginia 1701
Luke Wynn Year: 1701 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 6223 Primary Immigrant: Wynn, Luke Annotation: Abstracts of Virginia Land Office patent books 9 through 14, covering the early decades of the eighteenth century. Includes numerous references to land patented by "French refugees," the Protestants (Huguenots) who fled France after Louis XIV revoked the Source Bibliography: NUGENT, NELL MARION, abstractor. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants. Vol. 3: 1695-1732. Richmond [VA]: Virginia State Library, 1979. 578p. Indexed. Page: 47
Thomas Katharine Foley Gwynn Dates: 1726-1750 Location: Somersetshire Title: Esq., Member of Parliament for Herefordshire Gender: Male Family: Husband of: Gwynn, Katharine Title: Mrs. Address: Somersetshire Married: 24th. May, 1744 Dowry: 10,000 pounds Office Holdings: Political Office(s): Member of Parliament for Herefordshire Source Date: May, 1744 Source Info: Gentleman's Magazine, May, 1744

France 1703
Gerard-Pierre QUIN Gender: Male Father: Pierre QUIN Mother: Nicole PARANT Spouse's Name: Jeanne-Marguerite MARTINET Spouse's Father: Claude MARTINET Spouse's Mother: Marguerite PARISET Marriage Date: 24 sept. 1703 (24 Sep 1703) Marriage Location: Epernay

NC 1706
William Wynn State: NC County: Bath County Township: No Township Listed Year: 1706 Database: NC Early Census Index

Virginia 1714
Peter Gwynn Year: 1714 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 6223 Primary Immigrant: Gwynn, Peter Annotation: Abstracts of Virginia Land Office patent books 9 through 14, covering the early decades of the eighteenth century. Includes numerous references to land patented by "French refugees," the Protestants (Huguenots) who fled France after Louis XIV revoked the Source Bibliography: NUGENT, NELL MARION, abstractor. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants. Vol. 3: 1695-1732. Richmond [VA]: Virginia State Library, 1979. 578p. Indexed. Page: 141

England 1736
Thomas Gynn Gender: Male Christening Date: 26 Jan 1736 Christening Place: Molesworth, Huntingdonshire, England Father's Name Edward Gynn Source Citation: Place: Molesworth, Huntingdonshire, England; ; Date Range 1722 - 1812; Film Number 1040742

England 1738
Thomas Gwynn Burial Date: Feb 1738 Parish: St Dunstan in the West County: London Borough: City of London Record Type: Burial Register Type: Parish Register Source Citation: London Metropolitan Archives, St Dunstan in the West, Register of burials, 1709 - 1739, P69/DUN2/A/018/MS010350

Virginia 1740
Thomas Guinn Birth Date: 1740 Birthplace Virginia Vol 69 Page Number 13 Reference Historical reg. Of Virginians in the Rev. soldiers, saliors and marines, 1775-1783. Ed. By John H. Gwathmey. Richmond, Va. 1938. (13, 872p.):332

Virginia 1742-1820
I, David Gwin, of the county of Bath, State of Virginia, being advanced in years but of sound mind and disposing memory and calling to mind the uncertainty of human life and the numerous inconveniences which might arise from my dying intestate have thought proper to make this my last will and testament hereby revoking and annulling all former wills by me made: In Primus: I direct my executors hereinafter named as soon as may be after my decease, to pay my funeral expenses and all my just debts. Item: I give and bequeath to my son David Gwin all the lands I purchased of John and Thos. Peoples whereon I now live including the mountain tract to him and his heirs forever, but as my death may happen before my said son David Gwin arrives at lawful age, in case of such an event, it is my will and desire that the property before devised be managed by my executors or rented out at their discretion until my said son arrives at full age and the proceeds thereof be applied at their discretion to the support and maintenance of such of my daughters as may then be unmarried and the maintenance and education of my said son David Gwin and his heirs forever one thousand pounds in money which I hereby direct my executors to pay over to him when he shall arrive at the age of twenty one years. I also give and bequeath to my son David Gwin and his heirs forever my rifle gun, my desk and bookcase, my four tables, all my chairs, my bed and furniture and three chests, all which property I direct my Executors to have good care taken of and delivered over to my said son on his arriving at age aforesaid. Item: I give and bequeath to my grandson David Gwin Kincaid, son of Thos. Kincaid the lands allotted to him by Adam Lightner, James Campbell lying on the waters of Jackson's River in the County of Bath, being the same land whereon the said Thomas Kincaid now lives to him and his heirs forever, but it is my will and desire that the said Thomas Kincaid and his wife Sally and the longest liver of them shall have the right and privilege to live on and enjoy the whole of land during their natural lives upon condition they continue to reside on the same, but if they should, at any time, remove from said land then the benefits intended them by this devise shall cease and terminate and from the date of such removal the rents and profits and the right to use and occupy the land aforesaid shall rest in my grandson David Gwin Kincaid. Item: I give and bequeath to my son Robert Gwin and his present wife, Polly Gwin, and the longest liver of them the right during their natural lives to live on and enjoy the lands on Jackson's River allotted them for their son David by Adam Lightner and James Campbell and after the death of the longest liver of the said Robert and wife, I give and bequeath the said land to David, my grandson (and son of Robt. and Polly Gwin) to him, his heirs and assigns forever. Item: I give and bequeath to my son John Gwin and his present wife and the longest liver of them, the right to live on and enjoy the lands allotted them for their son David by Adam Lightner and James Campbell on Jackson's River and after the death of the longest liver of the said John and wife, I give and bequeath the said land to my grandson David Gwin (son of the said John) to him and his heirs and assigns forever. Item: I give and bequeath to my said Grandsons David Gwin Kincaid, David Gwin (son of Robert) and David Gwin (son of John) all my lands in the Big and Little Valleys on the waters of Wilson's Mill Run in the County of Bath to be equally divided between them, to them their heirs and assigns forever. Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Isabell and her heirs forever, one negro girl named Agnes and her future increase. Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Margaret and her heirs forever one negro girl named Betsy and her future increase. Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Rachel and her heirs forever one negro girl named Jane and her future increase. Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Susan and her heirs forever one negro girl named Violet and her future increase. Item: I give and bequeath to my son-in-law Robert Lockridge and Polly his wife and their heirs forever two dollars to be paid them by my executors in full for their portion of my estate. Item: I give and bequeath to my son James Gwin, one hundred pounds in money to him and his heirs forever to be paid him by my Executors soon after my decease. Item: To my sons Robert Gwin and John Gwin, I give and bequeath the sum of two Dollars cash to them and their heirs forever. To Thos. Kincaid and Sally his wife the sum of two dollars. To Jas. Wiley and Nancy his wife two dollars. To John Cleek and Jane his wife the sum of two dollars and to Samuel Givens and Elizabeth his wife the sum of two dollars which said legacies I hereby direct my Executors to pay as soon as may be after my decease, it is my will and desire that my Executors herein after named soon after my decease take into possession of the slaves Isaac and Fown which I loaned to Robt. Gwin, a negro named Ned I loaned to Thos. Kincaid and a negro woman named Daffney I loaned to John Cleek which said several salves were loaned to be returned whenever demanded. Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Rachel one feather bed and furniture also sum of sixty pounds in money to her and her heirs forever. item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Susan one feather bed and furniture also the sum of sixty pounds in money to her and her heirs forever. Item: It is my will and desire that my Executors as soon as they shall have paid my funeral expenses and just debts and satisfy all the legacies hereinbefore named do proceed to ascertain the amount of all the residue of my estate of every kind whatsoever including my slaves not hereinbefore devised, my debts, money, stock, etc., which residue when so ascertained I desire shall be divided into seven equal parts. One-seventh thereof I give and bequeath to my daughter Isabella her heirs and assigns forever. I give and bequeath one-seventh part thereof to my daughter Margaret her heirs and assigns forever. Same to my daughter Susan her heirs and assigns forever. One-seventh part to be equally divided among the children of my daughter Elizabeth Givens and to be paid over to them by my executors as they come of age resp. but it is my wish and meaning that out of this seventh part shall be deducted the amount of bonds due and owing to me from Samuel Givens the husband of my said daughter Elizabeth. I give an bequeath one-seventh part thereof to be equally divided among the children of my daughter Jane Cleek and to be paid over to them by my Executors as they come of age resp. and the remaining one-seventh of said residue I give and bequeath to the children of my daughter Nancy Wiley by her husband Jas. Wiley to be equally divided between them, to them and their heirs forever and to be paid over to them by my executors as they respectively become of age. Item: It is my will and desire that if any of my sons or daughters, sons-in-law or daughters-in-law, or any of my grand children shall be dissatisfied with the disposition I have made herein of my property and shall attempt to set aside this writing as my true last will and testament, they shall be excluded from all benefit of any portion of my estate whatever and every devise herein made to such person in such case shall be null and void. Lastly, I appoint Wm. Hogshead, my son-in-law, my son Jas. Gwin and my friend, Otho Wade Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby repeating the same to be such and renouncing and revoking all former wills by me made. In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 18th day of April 1820 and have caused the same to be witnessed in my presence. His David T. Gwin (SEAL) mark The above writing was signed, sealed, and declared to be the last will and testament of David Gwin in our presence by him and at his request and in his presence we subscribed the same as witnesses. John Steuart James Hicklin John Carlile Martin Coyner

France Birth 1748
Guillaume Guin Date: 22 mars 1748 (22 Mar 1748) Place: Pluduno, Côtes-d'Armor Record Type: Baptême Compiler: Julien THOMAS Full Text: GUIN Guillaume, de François, sabotier dans le bois de la Villeravet et Julienne BOURGE (T: Guillaume RENOT, Marie GUIN), 22 03 1748

Virginia 1750
James Guin Birth Date: 1750 Birthplace: Virginia Volume: 69 Page Number: 10 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. Va. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (189p.): 77
James Guin Birth Date: 1750 Birthplace: Virginia Volume: 69 Page Number: 10 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. Va. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (189p.): 77
John Guin Birth Date: 1750 Birthplace: Virginia Volume: 69 Page Number: 10 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. Va. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (189p.): 77
Patrick Guin Birth Date: 1750 Birthplace: Virginia Volume: 69 Page Number: 10 Reference: Heads of Fams. at the first U.S. census. Va. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (189p.): 77

U.S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 about Humphry Gwin
Name:       Humphry Gwin       
Rank - Induction:       Private       
Roll Box:       115       
Roll State:       Continental Troops       
Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783
Peter Guinn Rank - Induction: Priv Roll Box: 106 Roll State: VA

War Of 1812
Peter Wynn Widow: Mary Pension Number - #1: WC 20809 Pension Number - #2: WC 20809 Roll Number: 102 Archive Publication Number: M313

Joseph Gwinn d1778 Research Notes by Ruth Foreman
1770 , Charles County, Maryland - Charles County, MD Land Records 1722-1733, by TLC Genealogy, pg 5-6 Charles Co Lober L No. 2, page 11 At the request of Joseph Gwinn of CC, the following deed was recorded May 3, 1722. April 25, 1722 from John Gwinn of CC, planter, to Joseph Gwinn, eldest son of the afd Jno Gwinn, of same, for 5 shillings and for the natural love he has for his sd son Joseph and for maintenance & advancement of his sd son and for divers other good causes, a certain tract of land called Essex, lying near Cedar point in CC, & conveyed by John Hamilton, late of CC, Gent, to John Gwinn, late of CC, decd father of the sd John Gwinn first above named, & grandfather of Josh Gwinn, afd, containing and then laid out for about 75 acres, as by deed dated Aug 9, 1679. Also a certain tract of land called Rangle, lying in CC and adjoining a tract of land whereon Edmund Howard formerly dwelled, & conveyed by John Compton Jr, late of CC deced, to sd Jno Gwinn, father of the afd Josh Gwinn, containing and then laid out for about 140 acres, sd deed being dated Aug 10, 1713. Signed - Jno Gwinn. Wit - Waltr Storey*, Geo Dent*. Anna, the wife of Jno Gwinn, relinquished her right of dower in and to the within mentioned land and premises. Memo: the 2 tracts of land mentioned in this deed are enrolled among the records of CC Court. The tract called Essex was recorded in Liber I, folio 26. The tract called Rangle was recorded in Liber I folio 63 & 64. Mentioned in Mother's Will - MD Calendar of Wills Ann GWINN, Charles County Wr: Sept 3, 1736 Pr: Oct 2, 1736 To eldest son Joseph, grandsons Robert Yates, Barten Hungerford, Jr., granddau. Elizabeth Hungerford, and Sarah Bailey., daus. Elizabeth Hungerford and Ann Yates, personalty. To 3 children, Joseph, Benjamin and Ann Yates, residue of estate. Exs.: Robert Yates, Sr., Joseph and Benjamin Gwinn. Test: Dr. John Harris, Joshua Wilson. 21.686 ------ Land Records of Charles County 1752-1756 by TLC Genealogy pg 17 Liber A#3, page 84 (70). Feb 24, 1753 from Barton Hungerford Sr of CC, planter, to Thomas Hungerford, his son, of CC, planter. Sd Barton Hungerford Sr. and John Gwin had, by virtue of a writ Sept 26, 1724 ... purchased 12 acres..& obtained a lease for 80 years to build a water mill. John Gwin did, by his will, bequeath his moiety of sd land to his son Joseph Gwin. Now sd Barton Hungerford Sr. for 3000 pounds of tobacco, has sold to sd Thomas Hungerford, the afd 12 acres of land together with all houses, mill houses, stones, iron works, wood mill dams, ways, gates, priviledges, and appurtences of any kind. Signed - Barton Hungerford. Wit - Geo Dent, Robt Yates. -------- Charles Co., MD Probate Records 1777-1780 by TLC Genealogy pg 87 Page 205 Joseph Gwinn's Will. Aug 12, 1778. I, Joseph Gwinn of CC, planter, am at present somewhat ailing and sick in body but of disposing memory and judgment. I wish to be buried in a Christian and decent manner without much expense. To my wife Elizabeth Gwinn - after my death, my land and plantation whereon I live (all I have in possession) shall belong, during life, to my wife, during her widowhood. Also Negroes .... To my son Benjamin Gwinn - all my land, after my wife's death. Also Negroes and personalty. To my daughter Ann Harris, Negroes, personalty and livestock. To my son Joseph Gwinn, Negroes, personalty and livestock. To my daughter Violetta Gwinn - Negroes, furniture and livestock. The rest of my estate, after my debts are paid, I give to my wife, including Negroes, livestock, plantation and personalty. Executors: As my several sons live at a distance and have full employment, otherwise long hieritands, I hereby appoint my wife, and my son-in-law, Thomas Harris of CC, joint executors. Signed mar 2, 1778 in CC - Joseph Gwinn. Wit - John McPherson, Francis Maslin [sic], and Ninian Burrage.

*************** Virginia Colonial Militia, ------- DONNA / OUR LINE ***********
1758
County: Halifax County Date: Sep 1758 Name: Pearce Gwin Rank: Private

NC
1780
Peirce Guin Gender: M (Male) State: North Carolina County: Rowan County Residence Year: 1780 Household Remarks: "Cap. Johnston's District" SourceTax List - 1779 [NC State Archives]; Call Number: C.R. 085.701.5; ; Page Number: 68; Family Number: 13

Peter Guin Gender: M (Male) State: North Carolina County: Rowan County Residence Year: 1780 Household Remarks: "Capt.Nichols' District" Tax List - 1779 [NC State Archives]; Call Number: C.R. 085.701.5; ; Page Number: 48; Family Number: 12

Richd G Gender: M (Male) State: North Carolina County: Rowan County Residence Year: 1780 Household Remarks: C. Craiges District Document: Lists of Taxable Property - 1778 [NC State Archives]; Call Number: C.R. 085.701.5; ; Page Number: 7; Family Number: 13

South Caronia 1780
Peter Guin Gender: M (Male) State: South Carolina County: Ninety Six District Town: Turkey Creek and Savannah River Residence Year: 1780 Household Remarks: He is on "A List of Petit-Jury Men and Jury Men in Civil Causes" from "Between Turkey Creek & Savannah River." Jury Lists, 1779, Acts #1123 [at SC Archives]; ; ; Page Number: 15; Family Number: 144

1840 Virginia
Pearce Guinn residence: Not Stated, Patrick, Virginia page number: 37 nara publication number: M704 nara roll number: 573 film number: 0029691 digital folder number: 004410827 image number: 00079

REVOLUTIONAHY SOLDIERS OF VIRGINIA. 249
Putnam, Howard, S. of W. 1835, Pen.
3, Ind. 57.
Putnam, William (3 V. R.), W. D.
78, 4.
Putney, James (2 V. R.), W. D. 31,
9.
Putney, Lewis (2 V. R.), W. D. 34,
5.
Putny, Benjamin, U. S. Sen. R. Feb.
2, 1819.
Putt, Thomas, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 116.
Fyburn, Benjamin (8 V. R.), W. D.
180. 1.
Pyland (Piland, Poyland), William
(4 V. R.), W. D. 94, 1; W. D. 96,
1; (4, 8 & 12 V. R.), W. D. 315,
1,3.
Pyle (Pele), William, Hist. Shepherdstown,
88, 342.
Pyrers, Joshua (8 V. R.), W. D. 173,
2.
Q.
Quad. See Inad.
Quail, John (3 V. R.), W. D. 68, 1.
Quaintance, John (11 V. R.), W. D.
233, 1.
Quaker, Alexander (4 V. R.), W. D.
297, 1; (4, 8 & 12 V. R.), W. D.
317, 1.
Quaker, Elisha (4 V. R.), W. D.
97, 8.
Quamtance, John, S. of W. 1835, Pen.
2. Pa. 145.
Quarles (Quails, Quals, Quarls),
Abner (10 V. R.), W. D. 281, 2;
(14 V. R.), W. D. 219, 2; W. D.
258, 1, 2, 8; W. D. 269, 3, 8, 12.
Quarles, Henry (It.)- (15 V. R.), W.
D. 273, 1.
Quarles, James (capt.) (2 V. S. R.),
W. D. 47, 1; W. D. 53, 2.
Quarles, James (p. m.) (2 V. S. R.),
W. D. 47, 2.
Quarles (Quails), John (6 V. R.), W.
D. 136, 1, 7.
Quarles, Nathaniel (11 V. R.), W. D.
231, 1; (15 V. R.), W. D. 275, 1;
(5 & 11 V. R.), W. D. 335, 1; (11
& 15 V. R.), W. D. 337, 1.
Quarles, Thomas (It.) (2 V. R.), W.
D. 507.
Quarles, Thomas (en.) (2 V. S. R.),
W. D. 53, 14.
Quarles, Wharton (It.) (2 V. S. R.),
W. D. 55, 14.
Quay, John (It.), S. of W. 1835, Pen.
2, N. J. 35.
Queen, John (7 V. R.), W. D. 157, 1
Queen, Patrick, Rev. Army v. 2, 82.
Queen. See also Quinn.
Quesenbury, John (15 V. R.), W. D.
272, 1.
Quigg (Quegg), Daniel (1 V. R.), W.
D. 9, 6, 8; W. D. 285, 1.
Quill, John (2 V. R.), W. D. 56, 1.
Quillian (McQuillin, Quillin, Quillon),
Robert (1 V. R.), W. D. 13, 1, 10;
W. D. 14, 1, 3; W. D. 282, 1.
Quillian. See also McQuillian.
Quin, John (Amherst), Rev. Army
V. 1, 89.
Quin, Owen, Rev. Army v. 2, Gam.
87.
Quin, Patrick, M. L. W. Bk. 1, 267.
Quinlan, Joseph (3 V. R.), W. D. 60,
1.
Quinlin, Joseph, Aud. Acct. XXXI,
127.
Quinn (Quin), James (2 V. R.), W.
D. 36, 1; W. D. 42, 1; (15 V. R.),
W. D. 276, 1; (11 & 15 V. R.), W.
D. 337, 1.
Quinn (Quent, Quin, Quint), John (2
V. S. R.), W. D. 58, 1; (7 V. R.),
W. D. 159, 1; W. D. 160, 1; (11 V.
R.), W. D. 227, 1; W. D. 233, 3;
(15 V. R.), W. D. 272, 1; (11 &
15 V. R.), W. D. 338, 1; W. D.
341, 1; W. D. 342, 1.
Quinn, Joshua (6 V. R.), W. D. 128,
19; (10 V. R.), W. D. 207. 9.
Quinn (Queen, Quin), Owen (8 V. R.),
W. D. 175, 1, 9; (12 V. R.), W. D.
242, 2; W. D. 318, 1.
Quinn (Queen), Peter (8 V. R.). W.
D. 166, 4; W. D. 180, 1.
Quinn, Richard, W. D. 351, 3.
REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS OF VIRGINIA. 133
REPORT OF THE STATE LIBRARIAN.
Grovesett, Samuel, War 34, 57.
Grow (Grou), Isham (11 V. R.), W.
D. 236, 2; (11 & 15 V. R.), W. D. 344,
5.
Grubb, (capt), Scotcli-Irish,
V. 1, 19.
Grubb. Benjamin, Hist. Frederick Co.,
103.
Grubb, Henry, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 206.
Grubbs (Grubs), Henley (Hencely,
Henslev) (10 V. R.), W. D. 281, 1;
(14 V. R.), W. D. 219. 2; W. D. 269,
4.
Grubs, John (4 V. R.), W. D. 89, 1.
Grumm, Abrara, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 140.
Grun, Jesse. M. L. W. Bk. 1, 143.
Grunstaf, Lewis (S V. R.), W. D. 172,
1.
Grunter (Grinter). John (12 V. R.),
Gwinn, Jacob, M. L. W. Bk. 2, 294.
Gwinn, Joseph (4 V. R.), W. D. 90,
1.
Gwyn (Guinn), Francis (8 V. R.),
W. D. 187, 1; (4, 8 & 12 V. R.), W.
D. 314, 2.
Gwyn (Gwinn), Willis (4 V. R.), W.
D. 90, 1; W. D. 98, 1; W. D. 298.
1; (4, 8 & 12 V. R.). W. U. 317,
2.
Gwyn. -Sec Guin.
Gwynn, John, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 228.
W. D. 239, 5, 6.
Grymes. Benjamin (capt.). Doc. F.
Grymes. See Grimes.
Gue, John (6 V. R.), W. D. 137, 1; (10
V. R.), W. D. 206, 10.
Guerrant (Garrant, Guerant), John (2
V. R.). W. D. 43, 5, 10, 11; W. D.
44,1.
Guest (Guess), William (13 V. R.),
W. D. 254, 1.
Guffy, Hugh (S V. R.), W. D. 173,
1.
Gufty, John, sr. (10 V. R.), W. D.
208, 2; W. D. 288, 1.
Guffy, John, jr. (10 V. R.), W. D.
208, 2; W. D. 288, 1.
Guffy (Guffee, Guffey), John (14
V. R.), W. D. 257, 1, 4; W. D.
267, 1.
Gug, Joseph (3 & 7 V. R.), W. D.
300, 1.
Guggarty, Thomas (S V. R.) , W. D.
164, 2.
Guggarty, Thomas (4, S & 12 V.
R.), W. u. 314, 2.
Guill. See Gill.
Guin (Guinn, Guien), Andrew (8 V.
R.), W. D. 167, 6; W. D. 174, 1:
(12 V. R.), W. D. 240. 1; (4, 8
& 12 V. R.), W. D. 310, 1.
Guinn, James, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 117.
Gulley, John, S. of W. 1835, Pen. 3,
Tenn. 73.
Gulley, George (3 V. R.). W^ D. 65,
5; W. D. 74, 1; W. D. 77, 1; (3
& 7 V. R.), W. D. 306, 2.
Gunn, Claypole, Hist, of Rockingham,
77, 82.
Gunison, Samuel, S. of W. 1835, Pen.
3, Ky. 47.
Gunn, Elisha (2 V. R.), W. D. 34, o;
W. D. 44, 1.
Gunn, George (1 V. S. R.), W. D. 28,
1.
Gunnell. James (1 V. S. R.), W. D.
25, 1.
Gunner, James (13 V. R.). W. D.
250, 1.
Gunnett, Joseph, M. L. W. Bk. 1, 104.
Gunnle, Joseph, Aud. Acct. XXXI, 60.
Gunter, James (Albemarle), Rev.
Army v 1, Keg. 11.
Gunter, John (Accomac). Rev. Army
V. 1, Reg. 105.
Gunter. John (Louisa), Rev. Army
V. 1, Reg. 55.
Gunter, John, Win. 34.
Gunter, Levin (9 V. R.), W. D. 193,
o
Gurdan, George (Rockingham), Rev.
Army v. 1, Reg. 11.
Gutfey, Henry, Aud. Acct. XXXI,
132.
Guthrie. James (2 V. S. R.), W. D.
55, 1.
Guthrie (Guthery, Guthree, Guthrey),
John (2 V. S. R.), W. D. 55, 1; (5
V. R.), W. D. 103, 1; W. D. 110, 1;
(7 V. R.), W. D. 147, 1; W. D. 151,
6: (3 & 7 V. R.), W. D. 304, 1; (5
& 11 V. R.), W. D. 332, 1.
Guthrie, Nathaniel, S. of W. 1835,
Pen. 3, Ky. 116.
Guthry, George (It.), M. L. W. Bk. 2,
508.
Gutty (Guttry), John (10 V. R.), W.
D. 206, 1, 2.
Guy, Charles (6 V. R.), W. D. 140,
11.
Guy, .Toseph (7 V. R.), W. D. 158, 11,
13.
Guv, Samuel (7 V. R.), W. D. 159, 1,
6; (11 & 15 V. R.). W. D. 342, 1.
Guv, William (11 V. R.), W. D. 236, 1;
(15 V. R.), W. D. 276, 1; W. D. 279,
2; (5 & 11 V. R.), W. D. 330, 1; (11
& 15 V. R.), W. D. 344, 1.
Gwin. David (capt.) (Augusta), Va.
Mag. V. 7, 26.
Gwin, Jacob (1 V. S. R.) , W. D. 26,
1.
Gwin (Guinn). John (16 V. R.), W. D.
140, 2; (8 V. R.), W. D. 172, 1;
(10 V. R.), W. D. 201, 3; (11 V.
R.), W. D. 228, 1; (13 V. R.),
W. D. 255, 1.
Gwin, Joseph (It.) (Augusta), Va.
Mag. V. 7, 26.
Gwin, Thomas (13 V. R.), W. D. 255,

NC Census
Thornton P Gerin [Thornton P Guin] Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Stokes, North Carolina Year: 1810; Census Place: , Stokes, North Carolina; Roll: 43; Page: 534; Image: 0337916; Family History Library Film: 00219

France
Jean Baptiste Elie Guin Gender: Masculin (Male) Spouse's Name: Marie Claire Emelie Weiss Marriage Date: 3 oct. 1835 Father's Name: Pierre Awiele Guin Mother's name: Marie Anne André Spouse Father's Name: Jean Georges Weiss Spouse Mother's Name: Marie Elie Victa Pottier De La Richerie Ancestry.com. Marseilles, France Marriages, 1810-1915 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Archives de l'Etat civil de Marseille 1700-1922. Série 31 : Mariages femmes

1810-1915. Paris, France: ARFIDO S.A., 2010
16 nov. 1801 Marriage City: Aubigny Name: Pierre Genou Birth Date: 18 mars 1776 (18 Mar 1776) Birth City: Villeneuve Age: 25 Gender: M (Male) Residence City: Villeneuve Profession: maneuvrier Father Name: Jean Genou Father Birth Year: abt 1801 Father Age: Deceased Mother Name: Françoise+ Bauge Former Spouse Name: Gabrielle+ Roussele Spouse Name: Anne Auboiron Spouse Birth Date: 25 août 1779 (25 Aug 1779) Spouse Birth City: Aubigni Spouse Age: 22 Spouse Residence City: Aubigni Spouse Father Name: Jean AUBOIRON Spouse Father Residence City: Aubigni Spouse Father Profession: laboureur Spouse Mother Name: Gabrielle+ AUFAIRE Spouse Former Spouse Name: Jean+ FEVROT Witness 1 Name: Gilbert Auboiron Witness 1 Birth Year: abt 1768 Witness 1 Age: 33 Witness 1 Residence City: Aubigni Witness 1 Profession: laboureur Witness 1 Relationship: oncle f Witness 2 Name: Louis Auboiron Witness 2 Age: 31 Witness 2 Residence City: Aubigni Witness 2 Profession: laboureur Witness 2 Relationship: oncle f Witness 3 Name: Claude Giraud Witness 3 Age: 46 Witness 3 Residence City: Aubigni Witness 3 Profession: laboureur Witness 4 Name: Pierre Virlogeu Witness 4 Age: 45 Witness 4 Residence City: Aubigni

France Births
Pierre Gien Birth Date: 21 avr. 1776 (21 Apr 1776) Birth Parish: St Symphorien De Marmagne Gender: masculin (Male) Father: Hugues Gien Father Occupation: Tixier de toile Place of Father Occupation: à la Vernée Mother: Jeanne Chanmartin 1st Witness/Godfather: NECTOUX Pierre ferm de la Tour 2nd Witness/Godmother: BOUHERET Marie Delle, ferm à Marnay

Pierre Gien Birth Date: 30 juil. 1776 (30 Jul 1776) Birth Parish: St Symphorien De Marmagne Gender: masculin (Male) Father: Jean Gien Father Occupation: Laboureur Place of Father Occupation: à Maison Dru Mother: Jeanne Peraudin 1st Witness/Godfather: GIEN Pierre tonnelier à Maison Dru 2nd Witness/Godmother: GIEN Pierrette tante pat

Oaths of Allegiance - 1777 Pittsylvania County, VA source: The Magazine of VA Genealogy, v.23, #1 These lists were taken from a typewritten copy found in the Clerk's Office, Pittsylvania County, at Chatham, Virginia. The two following affidavits found attached to the copy are self- explanatory. I, S. H. F. Jones, do hereby certify that about the year 1930 I personally copied and had checked the names of persons who took the oath of Allegiance in 1777 as shown by manuscripts then in the Clerk's Office of Pittsylvania County, Virginia. The writing was faded and a few names could not be deciphered. Every effort was made to transcribe the names as they appeared on the manuscripts. The names of the foregoing Lists are a true and correct copy of the aforesaid manuscripts to the best of my knowledge and belief. The lists were also checked by Mr. Langhorne Jones, atty. Given under my hand and seal this 8th day of November, 1939. S. H. F. Jones (Seal) State of Virginia Pittsylvania County, To-wit: I, E. E. Friend, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, the same being a Court of Record, do hereby certify that Mrs. S. H. F. Jones whose name is signed to the foregoing writing bearing date 8th day of November 1939, personally appeared before me in my county, Office and State aforesaid and made oath that the foregoing statements are true to the best of her knowledge and belief. Given under my hand this 8th Nov. 1939. E. E. Friend Clerk Pittsylvania Circuit Court Chatham, VA
List of George Carter
Beverly Barksdale - William Bennett - Jno. Campbell - Abrm. Chaney - Jacob Chaney - Joseph Chaney - Zekial Chaney - Chas. Chelton - Mark Chelton - Thos. Chelton - Jno. Chilton - William Chilton - Matthew Cox - Thomas Crain - James Craine - Thomas Creal - Jno. Creel - Jeremiah Deadman - Elisha Dodson - Geo. Dodson - Lazarus Dodson - Rolly Dodson - Thos. Dodson - John Fitzgerald - Daniel Gardner - Heath Gardner - Nath. Gardner - Sylvany Gardner - James Haggard - Henry Harding - Martin Harding - Geo. Hardy, Jun. - Joshua Hardy - William Hardy - Micajah Harley - John H. Hedrick - William Ingram - Jeffry Johnson - Chs. Kennon - Elisha King - Francs. Kirby - Henry Kirby - Henry Kirby, Sr. - John Kirby, Jun. - William Kirby - Jno. Walter Kupper - James Lawless - Chs. Lewis - Jno. Lewis - Thos. Lomox - Matthias McBee - Chas. McLaughton - James McLees - John Madden, Jun. - Joshua Owens - Rolly Owens - Jno. Paul - Thomas Peyne - John Prestridge - Jno. Prestridge, Jr. - William Price - William Ryburn - Nimrod - Scott - Joshua Shirlock - Samuel Slate - Ben. Stratton - Thos. Stratton - Jno. Talleaferro - William Taylor - Barton Terry - Ben Terry - Charles Terry - David Terry - Harry Terry - Henry Terry - Jno. Terry - Joseph Terry - Joseph Terry, Jun. - Thos. Terry - Jno. Waller - Richd. Watson - John Winters Elias Wodson - Jno. Wright - Malachiah (unknown)
Persons Refusing to take Oath
Abrm. Campbell - Saml. Kirby - Uriah Pruitt - William Russell
Thomas Dillard, List
Chas. L. Adams - Henry Barton - William Bingham - John Bowmer - Henry Brown - James Brown
Robert Bruce - William Cash - William Chick - James Childress - Major Childress - Matthew Childress - Isaac Clement - Stephen Clements - Joseph Collon - William Collon - John Dillard - James Doss - James Doss - John East, Sen. - Joseph East - Thos. East - Samuel Eblin - Richard Ellis - Edward Evens - George Evens - George Evens, Jr. - Moses Faris - William Fealder - Nathl. Handrake - Thomas Hardie - Tho. Harris - Jacob Holland - Sec. Hook - David Hunt - Thomas Kersey - Harmon King - John Luck - Moses McDaniel - James Markin - Henry Mullins - Jacob Nichols - John Owen - Thorpe Parrott - Jessey Pattey - Green Wood Payne - John Pemberton - William Pemberton - Joseph Slater - Christopher Sutton
Issac Tynes - James Vaughan - John Vaughan - Thomas Vaughan - William Vaughan - George West - John West - Joseph West - Joseph West, Jr. - Owen West - George Wilcox, Jr. - George Wilcox, Sen.
Stephen Coleman's List
Richard Bayn - Charles Beasley - Henry Blanks - John Boise - Joseph Boise - Josiah Boise - Ben. Brawner - Samuel Brooks - John Brown - Nathan Brown - Richard Brown, Sen. - James Cardwell
William Childress - Richard Chumney - William Connelly - William Donaldson - Moses Estes - John Farguson - Joseph Farguson - Isham Farmer - James Farmer - James Farmer, Jun. - David Gwyn - Thos. Gwyn - Ambrose Haley - John Hammond - David Henry - Hugh Henry - Isaac Henry - Thos. Hutchings - David James - Edward Jones - Thomas Jones - John Justice - Joseph Leak - Thos. Leak - John Martin - Jacob Meadows - George Murphy - James Murphy, Jun. - James Murphy, Sr. - John Owen - Thos. Pass - Reuben Payne - William Porter - William Ragsdale - William Right - William Russell - John Shackleford - Cornelius Short - James Singleton - Thos. Sparks - Abrm. Spencer - John Stewart - John Stone - Saml. Stone - Stephen Terry - William Terry - David Walker - Jno. Watkins - David Watt - George West - Rawley White - Beverly Willard - John Williams - Joseph T. Williams - William Williams - John Willis - William Willis - John Yates - Richard Yates
Capt. Hankin's List
Joseph Akins - William Akins - Abraham Aron - Henry Atkins - Henry Atkins - Richard Atkins - William Atkins - John Ball - Joseph Ballinger - Caleb Brewer - Frances Bucknall - John Bunkley - Jacob Cleveland - Thomas Clift - William Coggin - John Cook - William Cook - David Dalton - James Dalton, Sen. - William Day - Leonard Delosher - James Devine - John Devine - William Devine - Robert Duncan - James Durrey - George Dyer - Arthur Fuller - Brit. Fuller - Zachariah Fuller - William Goodman - James Gravely, Junr. - Watson Henry -Edmund Hodges - Jesse Hodges - Thomas Hodges - Luther Hopper - Robert Hopper - Harrison Hubbard - Caleb Hundley - John Jackson - Samuel Johnson - William Johnson - Alexander Lackey - James Lynch - William McGeehee - David McKinney - Stephen McMillan - Mathew Martin - William Mathews - William Mayes - James Mitchell - William Morgan - John Mullins - William Mullins - William Neally - William Oliver - John Pearson - William Pigg - Richard Prewitt - Hugh Reynolds - Joseph Reynolds - John Roberts - William Roberts - Benjamin Sexton - George Smith - Joseph Standley
John Warren - John White
Lankford's List
John Ballinger - John Barrett, Jr. - John Bay, Jr. - William Betterton - John Brewer - James Buckley - John Buckley - Francis Chumley - John Cleaver - Stephen Collins - Soloman Cross - John Dickerson - William Doss - Abraham Downey - Peter Downey - Elisha Dyer - Charles Farris, Jr. - James Farris, Jr. - Joseph Farris, Jr. - Joseph Farris, Sen. - Thomas Farris, Sen. - Robert Ferguson - James George - John George - John George - Collins Hampton - Thomas Hampton - John Harness - James Harris, Sen.
William Harskins - James Henderson, Sen. - Thomas Henderson - Benjamin Hedrick - John Keezee - Geo. Landsdown - Joseph Lankford - Franc. Luck - James Maybee - Henry Mitchell - Joseph Moody - Daniel Morgan - George Morgan - Francis Short - Joel Short - William Sizzer - John Stone - Joshua Stone - Rich. Todd - Willm. Todd - Meshack Turner - Shadrick Turner - Abner Vance - Matthew Vance - Thos. Vaughan, Jr. - Thos. Vaughan, Sr. - Willm. Vaughan - John Whelock - R. Williams - L.C. Wilkin - John Wyatt
Jas. Morton's List
Joseph Austin - James Biggers - William Bisnell - James Bleakley - John Bleadley - Joshua Cantrell - Edward Covington - James Cox, Sen. - John Cox, Sen. - Benj. Crowley - Richard Cullom - Jesse Duncan
James Fulton - Archd. Gibson - John Gibson - Randolph Gibson - Samuel W. Gouley - James Granly - William Hankins - Thomas Harget - Daniel Johnston - Thomas Johnston - John Jones - James King - Adam Lackey - John Lackey - Thomas Livingston - Zachariah McCubbins - James McGeehee - Walter Matney - George Mays - Jehu Morton - John Morton - John Nelson - Joshua Nelson - William Oakes - David Payne - Edmd. Payne - Mathew Pigg - David Rawlings - William Read - Ignatius Redmond - James Richey - James Robertson - John Robertson - Wm. Robertson - Matthew Sparks - John Stocktone - Robert Stocktone - Adam Stultz - David Watson - James Whitesides - James Young
Robert Payne's List
Jana. Abbott - William Astin, Jun. - Henry Baldwin - Chas. Barnett - Lewis Barton - James Brown - Sam. Bynum - Jno. Cargill - Thos. Charlton - Jacob Chipman - Jno. Chipman - Wm. Cornelius - Ben Craigg - James W. Daniel - James Dix - John Dix - Jno. Dix - William Dix - William Dix - Thomas Dudley
Lewis Garrett - Richard Gibson - Will Gillaspy - Richard Gwynne - Saml. Harris - Jno. Haskins - George Hudson - George Humphries - Jno. Jones - William Kennon - Benj. Lawless, Jr. - Jno. Lawrence - David Lay - Geo. Lumpkins, Sen. - Peter McCaul - Jno. McMillion - Hugh Mahoon - Wm. Muncas - Michl. Obarr - Luke Pendergrass - Thos. Perkins - Thos. Pestal - Benj. Ratcliff - Jno. Ratcliff - Wm. Richardson - James H. Roberson - David Rolls - George Southerland - William Stubblefield - Parmenas Taylor - Ben Theasher - James Thornton - Wm. Travis - Geo. Twedell - Jacob Whitworth - Davd. Worsham - Jno. Worsham - Bazald Wyer - Jno. Wyer - William Wynn, Sen. - John Wynne - Robert Wynne - John Yates, Jun. - Geo. Yunt
Reuben Pain's List
Absolem Addams - Allen Addams - Cain Addams - John Addams, Jun. - John Addams, Sen. - Nathan Addams - Thomas Addams - William Addams - Zebulon Brynson - Samuel Dilerd - John Dupays - Pryant Easley - Josiah Fargeson - Moses Freeman - Thos. Gee - Henry Hall - John Hall - John Hall - Daniel Hankins - Thomas Hardy - Thomas Hardy, Sen. - William Hardy - Hugh Henry, Sr. - Nathaniel Hughes - Aaron Hutchings - Charles Hutchings - Charles Hutchings - Christopher Hutchings - Moses Hutchings - Benjamin Lankford - Francis Lamson - Jonas Lawson - Daniel Lovell - Marcom Loval - John McGhee - John Martin - John May - John Mode - William Moore - John Nuckels - Josiah Nuckles - Edmund Pain
Philemon Pain - John Parsons - Joseph Parsons - Samuel Parsons - George Perseye - Hezekiah Pigg
James Pigg - Benjamin Porter - Joseph Porter - Joseph Pruett - Bird Pruitt - Levey Pruitt - Daniel Ragsdale - Frederick Ragsdale - Joseph Richards - Armstead Shelton - John Short - William Short - Burel Vading - Zachariah Waller - William Waters - Archebel Weatherford - Harding Weatherford - John Weatherford - Joshua Welch - John Wilson - John Wimbush - William Witcher
Charles Kennon's List
James Adams - Baker Ayers - Moses Ayers - William Barker - Thomas Beach - Jno. Bennett - Thomas Bennett - Benj. Burgess - Edward Burgess - Zack Bowles - George Carter - Jno. Carter - William Carter - William Cauthern - Tunis Cole - Charles Collie - William Collie - Bartholomew Crowder - James Daniel - John Ditty - David Dodson - Fortunatus Dodson - Geo. Dodson - Greenham Dodson - Hightower Dodson
Jesse Dodson - Rolly Dodson - Tho. Dodson - William Dodson - William Durrett - Patrick Early - Joseph Echols - Richard Echols - George Eubanks - Daniel Everett - David Hall - John Hall - John Hall, Jr. - Joseph Hall - Joses (?Moses) Hanks - Benj. Harrison - Jonathan Hill - Joseph Hill - Thomas Hill
Edward Howard - Ezekial Howard - Alexander Lee - Charles Lewis - Howell Lewis - John Lewis (Byrd) - Robert Lewis - William Lewis - Ratherick McDaniel - John Madden - Robert Madden - Thomas Madden - William Maddon - Smallwood Coghill Marlin - Peter Martin - James Menasco - James Sml.wood Owen - John Owen - Uriah Owen - William Owen - William Owen, Jr. - Michael Ozbrooks - John Payne - John Payne - John Payne - Poyndexter Payne - Robert Payne - William Petty - Zack.h Pruitt - Phillip Pruitt - Samuel Pruitt - James Roberts - Buckner Russell - Jeremiah Simpson - John Stamps - Isham Tatum - William Thomas - William Twedel - Elijah Walters - John Walters - Robert Walters Robert Walters, Jun. - Thomas Walters - Thomas Walters, Jr. - William Walters - James Watson - John Watson - Jonathan Weldon - Peyton Wood - Thomas Wynne
Capt. Jas. Roberts' List
Martin Bailey - Wm. Bailey - Lemuel Black - Thomas Black - Samuel Bolling - Robert Bolton - Thomas Brandon - James Brewer - James Brewer - Thomas Bucknall - William Burdeth - Samuel Calland - Charles Calloway - John Campbell - Stephen Center - John Cock - Benjamin Cook - James Dillard - Benjamin Duncan - Samuel Duncan - John Durham - Joseph Dyer - John Ellis - Peter Finney - William Fitzgerald - Michael Gilbert - Benjamin Hammmond - William Hammond - John Hanna - William Heard - Noble Johnson - John Kirby - Nathaniel Kirby - Adam Lackey - Thomas Lackey - William Lackey - Saml. Langbee - Thomas Lawrence - Benjamin Leprad - Littleberry Mallock - John Melton - William Peak - William Pigg - David Ray - Payton Smith - Robert Smith - William Still - James Stockley - Jeremiah Stone - George Taylor - Ludwick Tuggle - William Turner - John Walker - William Webb
Refused ---- James Lander
Abraham Shelton's List
Absolem Bransom - William Bucknal - John Caffey - Seth Caldwell - Stephen Coleman - Alex Donelson John Donelson, Esq. - John Donelson, Jun. - Charles Dowel - William Easley - Joseph Farris - John Farthing - Richard Farthing - Tandy Farthing - Edmund Fitzgerald - Harris Gammon - Jonathan Griffeth - William Griffith - William Griffith, Jr. - Holmes Gwinn - John Gwinn - Daniel Hankins, Esq. - John Henry - Henry Hix - George Holland - James M. Hugh - John Jones - William Jones - John Kirby - William Lewis - Joseph Maples - Samuel Martin - James Metcalf - John Metcalf - Joseph Metcalf - Joseph Morton, Esq. - John Norton - Bryan Oneal - William Pace - Joseph Parsons - Richard Parsons - William Parsons - Reuben Payne, Esq. - Richd. Pilson - William Purnell - John Rigney - Jesse Robinson
Jesse Rowland - Nath. Rowland - Symon Rowland - Crispin Shelton, Esq. - Daniel Shelton - John Shelton - Phil. Southerland - Jas. Semore Swinney - John Swinney - James Taylor - Joseph Terry - William Thomas - Jeremiah Warsham - John Watson - John Watson, Jr. - Thomas Watson - William Watson - Nattey Wheat - William Widby - Major Willis - Stephen Yates
Refused - Chas. Rigney, Jun. ---- Chas. Rigney, Sen. ---- Jonathan Rigney
Crispin Shelton's List
David Barber - John Barber - John Barrott - Richard Barrott - James Bruce - Uriah Cammeron - Abednego Castiel - Thomas Davis - John Doss - John East - Elisha Farris - Thomas Farris, Jun. - Robert Foster - Thomas Gazaway - John Greggory - Benjamin Gudger - James Heneerson, Junr. - Joshua Hudson - Paul Hudson - David Irby - Francis Irby - James Irby - Peter Irby - Jesse Keezee - Richard Keezee - Moreman Lawson - Charles Lewis, Jun. - Charles, Sen. (Sic) - Abraham Motley - Avery Mustain - Jesse Mustain - Thomas Mustain - Leonard Pace - Lewis Parrott - Abraham Payne - John Payne - Josiah Payne - Leonard Payne - Thomas Payne - William Payne - Joseph Roberts - George Russ - Thomas Shields - Abraham Shelton - Beverly Shelton - Crispin Shelton, Jun. - Gabriel Shelton - Vincent Shelton - William Shelton - Young Shelton - Edmund Taylor
William Short's List
Samuel Askey - Peter James Bailey - Thos. Burgess - John Cartin - Daniel Davis - John Gee - Henry Hardin - Mark Hardin - Martin Hardin - Wm. Hartin - Daniel Lynch - (unknown) Perdew - Isaac Sartin - Page Sartin - Sillvanus Stokes - Geo. Strother - Gabl. Tutt
William Ward's List
Joshua Abston - William Baker - Reuben Bennett - William Bennett - John Bobbitt - John Bosswell - Jeremiah Burnett - John Byrd - Charles Calloway - Benjamin Clements - Benjamin Clements - James Clements - Thomas Colley - Shadrick Collier - John Collin - James Dalton - John Dalton - Joseph Dalton - Randolph Dalton - John Ellis - William Ellis - David Evens - Benjamin Foster - John Goard - Thomas Goard - William Goard - Richard Halloway - John Hargess - John Holland - Thomas Holland - George Keysee - John Lawson - Benjamin McDowell - William McDowell - Michael Mullings - Benjamin Mullins - Thomas Music - John Neal - Little B. Patterson - David Perry - Elisha Pruitt - Field Robertson - John Robertson - Thomas Robertson - Joseph Smith - Ralph Smith - William Smith - William Spragins - Nathan Thurman - Charles Walden
John Wilson's List
George Adams - Richard Anders - John Anglin - John Asher - John Ashworth, Jr. - Bob Baker - Thos. Billing - John Booth - George Brittian - Thomas Brown - James Brumfield - Charles Burton - James Burton - John Anderson Burton - Wm. Burton - Sterling Cats - Joseph Cook - John Davis - Thos. Cooper Dickerson - Larkin Dix - Thos. Drake - Charles Duncan - John Duncan - James Elliott - Benj. Fallow - Edmund Fallow - Thos. Fletcher - Julas Gibson - James Gossett - James Gossett, Sr. - Shadrick Gossett
Thos. Gossett - James Gowing - Geo. H. Gwin - John Gwin - Edmund Hammons - David Harris - Gosdale Hollis - Joseph Irwin - Wm. Irwin - Charles Lacy - David Lacy, Jr. - Geo. Lacy - John Lacy - Richard Lacy - John Fuller Lane - James Lawles - Edward Legg - Charles Longmir - John McClain - Daniel McDaniel - (unknown) Mahaney - John Marr - Nathan Morefield - Nehemiah Morton - David Owen - John Owen - William Owen - William Owen - James Parrott - Peter Perkins - John Phillips - John Prewett - John Price - Timothy Reagain - William Ricketts - Francis Ross - John Ross - Bazela Scott - Simon Scott - John Shelton - William Shelton - David Shockley - Edward Smith - Hezekiah Smith - Mathew Sparks - Thomas Sparks - Levy Stockley - John Stone, Jr. - John Stone, Sr. - Wm. Stublefield - Geo. Sutherlin - John Sutherlin - Joseph Tomling - Lewis Tucker - Geo. Vincent - Moses Vincent - Thos. Vicent - Elisha Walker - Thomas Waroham (?Worsham) - Thomas Watson - Benj. White - Thomas Wilkerson - Charles Williams
Thos. Williamson - Peter Wilson - William Wilson - Thomas Wright
William Witcher's List
Jesse Atkenson - Moses Atkenson - Morris Atkinson - Henry Atkinson - John Barnard - Bery Bennett - James Bennett - Richard Bennett - Stephen Bennett - Thomas Bennett - Wm. Bennett, Sr. - Randal Bobit - Robert Bomer - Jno. Clement - Dan'l Collins - David Dalton, Jr. - John Dalton - Robert Dalton - Robert Dalton - Samuel Dalton - Soloman Dalton - Thomas Dalton - Timothy Dalton - Wm. Dalton
Jacob Dyer - William Dyer - Arthur Fearn - Richard Fowler - Jas. Garrison - Abraham Goad - Charles Goad - Robert Goad - Wm. Goad - Richard Hammock - James Harrison - George Henderson - John Henslie, Jr. - Jno. Henslie, Sen. - William Henson - James Hill - Nathan hill - Jno. Hudson - Jno. P. Hudson - John Hunt, Sen. - Jno. Jennings - James Johnston - Henry Kirby - William Lawson - James Lidleton - Wm. Lovell - James Mitchell - William Moore - Patrick Morrison - Brain W. Nowlin - James Nowlin - Charles Partin - Jno. Partin - Geo. Peak - Jno. Peak - Jonathan Phillips - Tobias Phillips - James Phipps - David Polley - Christain Pryant - Thomas Ramsey, Sr. - Thomas Ramsey, Jr. - Abraham Razor - Paul Razor, Sr. - Paul Razor, Sr. - Paul Razor, Jr. - Robert Sevier - Thos. Shockley - Elias Smith - Wm. Smith - Benj. Tarrant - William Thompson - Simon Toshes - Jas. Turley - Jno. Turley - Daniel Wade - Edward Wade, Jr. - Edward Wade, Sr. - Peyton Wade - Isaiah Waldrup - Jno. Waldrup, Jr. - Jno. Waldrup, Sr. - Joseph Walker - Sanders Ward - David Willis - Daniel Witcher - Ephraim Witcher - James Witcher - John Witcher, Jr. - John Witcher, Sen. - Ruben Witcher - William Wright
Last name of next three unknown
Geo.-- James -- Joseph
Gwyn Family Lineage

The following is from two separate typscripts (no name or date on either, but apparently 1940s) in the Gwyn family file at the Rowan Public Library in Salisbury, North Carolina. Such claims to royal ancestry must always be taken with a great deal of skepticism. My comments are at the bottom. See also http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/northwest/sites ---------- www.bbc.co.uk/wales
TYPESCRIPT 1 ------------ The Gwyn family is of ancient Welsh lineage, antedating the Christian era, as has been deduced by Welsh genealogists from public and private records showing that they were descended from the Queen of Brigantes, the princes of Wales, kings of England, and the kings of Gwent and Glamorgan. The name Gwyn means 'whith.' It appears in the various spellings of Gwyn, Gwynn, Gwynne, Gwin, Guin. Also, the name Wyn, Wynn, Wynne, Winn, Winne, derived by dropping the letter G, first occured when Owain Gwynedd, a lineal descendant of Gwyn ap Colwyn, Lord of Dyfed, Prince of North Wales, married Christian, from whom issued the Wynns of Gwydir, as shown upon the tablet in Gwydir Chapel at Llanrwst, Wales. Owen Gwyn, Esp., a descendant of Owain Gwynedd, was one of the large subscribers to the Virginia Company and one of the contributors to the sustenance of the colonists in 1610. Further evidence of the kinsihp of the Gwyns and Wyns is shown in the follow extracts from the Calendar of Wynn (of Gwydir) Papers (1515-1690): 1574 Dr. John Gwyn (d. 1574) devises all his lands in Carnarvon to his brother Griffith Wynn; also an annual rent of 40 pounds towards the maintenance of 3 fellows and 6 scholars at St. John's College, Cambridge. (The tutorial burser of St. John's College writes to the author of "Happy Valley," Thomas F. Hickerson, of the University of North Carolina (1939) that Dr. John Gwyn had two brothers: Maurice Wynn, father of Sir John Wynn, 1st baronet; Griffith Wynn, father of Owen Gwyn (d. 1633). There was no kind of uniformity in the 17th century as regards spelling, and that, quoting Ballinger, "the definite adoption of Wynn as the family surname began with Maurice Wynn, though one of his brothers (Dr. John Gwyn) went through life as a Gwyn." March 17, 1611 Richard Gwynn (Archdeacon of Bangor) writes a business letter to his brother Sir John Wynn of Gwydir. October 18, 1612. St. John's College, Cambridge. Owen Gwyn, Master of St. John's College, Cambridge, to his first cousin Sir John Wynn at Gwydir. Is assured of Sir John's joy at his good fortunes. If he were not thankful unto God and his good friends he were not worthy to breathe. The jars and wrangles betwixt Sir John and the writer's brother Hugh have been more grevous to him than his own preferment has been joyous. It is his earnest desire to stay the quarrel between them. (The said Hugh Gwyn (d. 1674) did not come to America, but a son of this Owen Gwyn may have been the Col. Hugh who came to the Virginia Colony and acquired Gwynn's Island, later becoming a burgess.) Feb. 23, 1613. The Archbishop of Canterbury to Hugh Gwyn (of Berthddu). Copy of a license to eret a sepulchral monument in the chancel of the church of Llanrwst to his father and mother, Gruffith Wyn and Owen Salusbury; to be suspended on the north side, with arms of the Gruffith and Owen, and an epitaph setting forth the names and lives of the defunct. The keys of the said church to be delivered to the said Hugh Gwyn when he shall require them. While it is not definitely known from which of the many lines of the family in Wales the first emigrants of the name to America were descendants, it is generally believed that all of the Gwynns and Gwinns are extremely ancient origin, and in many cases of common ancestry. The first of the name in America is believed to have been Hugh Gwyn or Gwin(n), who came from Wales to Virginia sometime before 1639 and settled in York County. By his wife Ann he is believed to have left issue of Elizabeth, Hugh and possibly of the Reverend John. Of these probable children of the immigrant Hugh, the Reverend John came to Virginia during Cromwell's time and settled in Gloucester County. He was the father of, possibly among others, a son named Edmund, who married Lucy Bernard and was the father by her of Lucy and John.
GWYDIR CASTLE ------- Gwydir Castle, situated abut one mile from Llanwrst, North Wales, was the ancient Royal Residence of Wales. Llewelyn the Great (1194-1240), son-in-law of King John of England, was associated with Gwydir Castle and his stone coffin is to be seen in old Gwydir Chapel which adjoins Llanrwst Church. It was however through his descendant (David Prince of Wales) that Gwydir, in A.D. 1480 first became associated with the Wynn family. Sir John Wynn (1553-1627), first of the baronets, lived at Gwydir. From 1480 until 1678 it remained the seat of the Wynn family. In 1922, a large part of the Castle was destroyed by fire. What is left of it is still open daily (in normal times) to visitors, and it is claimed is worth seeing. From Dr. Powel's History of Wales we find a bit of romantic conjecture in connection with the discovery of America as follows: "Madoc, son of Owen Gwyneth, prince of North Wales, reachead the American shores in the year 1170." Most probably, however, says the historian "this worthy young man did not extend his voyage of discovery beyond the Coast of Spain, by no means an inconsiderable exploit for that age." Another bit of conjecture is centered around Button Gwinnett (1734-1777), signer of the American Declaration of Independence from Georgia, whose last autograph sold for $22,500 . . . (1926). He came from Wales to Savannah, Ga., or thereabouts, via Bristol, England and Charleston, S.C.

COL. HUGH GWYN AND GWYNN'S ISLAND ---------- The prevalance of the names Hugh, John and Richard among the descendants of Col. Hugh Gwyn (Gwin, Gwynne) tend to substantiate the family tradition and the conclusions of genealogists, viz., that he was closely connected with the House of Gwydir. It appears more plausible, however, that he was the son of Owen Gwyn, Master of St. John's College, Cambridge, and first cousin of Sir John Wynn, rather than the son of Owen Wynn of Gwhdir, as stated in Mrs. Hallie D. Pittmen's book "Americans of Gentle Birth." Concerning Gwynn's Island there is a legend that it was given to Hugh Gwyn by a daughter of an Indian chief as a a token of gratitude when he rescued her from drowning. (However, the land grant records in Richmond, Va., prove that he obtained the island as a reward for transporting settlers to the Colony of Virginia.) The story by Virgil G. Hudgins, a native of the island, who recently planned a pageant celebrating the event, is as follows: "It was in the summer of 1634," writes Mr. Hudgins according to the Mathews Journal, "that Hugh Gwynn, of Milford Haven, Wales, after a year or so of sojourning at Jamestown, Va., accompanied by two negro servants started in a small boat to explore parts of the Chesapeake Bay. "Having reached what wa then a thoroughfare on theeast end of the island he landed for a short sojourn at what is now Gwynnsville. While admiring the beauty of his surroundings and the rich fertility of the island soil he saw a young woman in a small 'dugout' canoe paddling towards the island from the mainland. The water being rough the frail craft capsized and Mr. Gwynn and his servants hastened to the woman's rescue, and saved her from drowning. "Mr. Gwynn later questioned the young woman, asking who she was and what she was doing out there alone. Her reply was: 'I am the daughter of Chief Piankitank and I have come to worshop the Great Spirit on my island, but as you have saved my life, I give this island to you in token of my gratitude.' "Mr. Gwynn returned to Jamestown and made a request to the King of England for a patent grant which was given, and then he moved his family consisting of two sons and one daughter to the island where he built a log cabin and named his homestead 'Gwynnsville,' and named the body of water separating it from the mainland 'Milford Haven' in remembrance of a similar body in Wales.'" Legends differ as to just who the Indian maid was, some declare that it was no other than Pocahontas, but, alas, there is no historical data to base any such assumption upon, authorities agree. At any rate, several patent grants for the island and portions of the mainland thereabouts are recorded in the land office at Richmond under the dates 1635, before and after. In addition to Gwynn's Island, Col. Hugh Gwyn owned 202 acres opposite the island acquired later by Wm. Armistead; 6,000 acres on the Potomac in Westmoreland; 700 acres in Isle of Wight; also land in York County, Va., where he was justice of the peace in 1641 and burgess in 1646. In "Standard's Colonial Virginia Register" we find a list of the burgesses and a record (incomplete) of their proceedings. The name Hugh Gwyn (Gwin, Gwyinne) is given in the general index as burgess for the period 1612-1659. He represented Charles River Co., in 1639; York in October 1646; Gloucester in April-May- November 1652. The name Hugh Gwyn (Gwynn, Gwynne, Gwin) occurs frequently in the colonial records of Virginia. He was one of the earliest settlers in Old Gloucester (formed from York), which (1710) was the most populous county in Virginia and the cradle of a great many distinguished families that have long since removed to other sections of the country. The destruction of the old Gloucester records during the two wars left gaps that add to the difficulty in tracing completely the family history. [Note: During the American Revolution, Lord Dunmore, the last royal governor, established his capital at Gwynn's Island after Norfolk was burned.]
TYPESCRIPT 2 ----------- The authoritatiave genealogists state that the Gwins are descended from Sir Gwaine (or Gwin), a half mythical knight in the half-mythical court of King Arthur. However, there seems to be certain evidence that there was a King Arthur at a very early date in Wales and South West England with his capitol at Camelot (now Cardiff) and his Knights of the Round Table. If this is true, it is just as certain that there was a Sir Gwaine, as he is spoken of in all the Arthurian Legnds as one of the most powerful knights of his time. The name Gwaine is merely an Anglization of Gwin and in some very old chronicales Sir Gwaine is spoken of as Sir Gwin. The name Gwin is one of the oldest of the Welsh names. It is of pure Celtic origin. It is also spelled: Gwinn, Gwyn, Gwynn, Gwynne, Gwyne, Gwine and Gwain. One of the earliest mentions of the name is that of Gwin ap Howell (or Gwin, the son of Howell) who led a Welsh army in 951. He died at his Castle Bwerfyl in 987. He carried on constant warfare against the Norsemen who were at that time harrying the shores of Wales and Ireland. The Welsh were the last people to successfully resist invasion from the Norse and Danish tribes and were never finally overrun until the Conquest of William the Conqueror in 1066 and even this doughty warrior said that he had rather relinqish the country than conquer it (so fierce were the tribesmen). The ancient Welsh name for the Kingdom of North Wales was Gwinllian (or Gwinsland) and one of its first kings was the mighty Griffyd ap Gwinn. The Gwins were closely associated with and intermarried with the Howells, the Powys, the Griffyds, the Llewelyns, the Morgans and the mighty Tudors who later became the monarch of all England under Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, and grandson of Sir Gwin Tudor, in 1485 [who] became, after the Battle of Bosworth Field, King Henry VII. His first General of Hosts (or Field Marshal) was Sir Owen Gwin (or Gwynn). There are two branches of the Gwin family, both having the same common ancestry and arms. The first is the Gwins of Ynys-y-Maengwyn [Ynysymaengwyn], Co. Merioneth. For the most part this branch spells its name Gwyn or Gwynn. few have ever left Wales and therefore the majority of Gwins in America are from the other or Abercrave branch. This branch had its seats or castles at Brecon and Baglan Houses, Co. Glamorgan. They take their line from Sir John Gwin, second son of Sir Edward Gwin of Glyntawe, who was the great-great grandson of Rhydderch ap Gwin, who was in turn a descendant of Trahearn ap Inon ap Gwin, Loed of Cwmwd [N.B. Unable to identify]. The Gwins came to America, some by way of Scotland, where they had fled after a rebellion, the first part of the 1700s and landed in Pennsylvania. Later they joined the German and Scotch Irish migration to Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas. A few of them entered via Charleston, S.C. and these for the most part remained in South Carolina. The first of the Gwins in Maryland was Bernard Gwin who married in 1797, Susanna Hilleary. He was an ex-Revolutionary soldier and was a captain at the close of the war. In Ireland Sir John Gwin had married Catherine O'Cotter in 1716 and their son, Griffith, moved to America and landed in Philadelphia in 1727. . . . Lady Eleanor (Nell) Gwynn was one of the leading actresses in the reign of Charles I of England. She was born 1650 and died in 1687. The King became very attached to her and by her had a son who became the Duke of St. Albans and from him the present Dukes are descended. The King's dying admonition to his brother, the Duke of York, was "Let not poor Nelly starve." The family in Wales and many in America has been for the most part of the Baptist persuasion; however, through the branch who migrated to Scotland before coming to America, there are now many of the Presbyterian faith. In the former the sept has produced many noted divines in Wales.

COL HUGH GRANT LAND PATENT --------------------------------------- Patent Book No.3: page 120)
To all &c. Whereas &c. Now Know yee that I the said Richard Bennett Esqr. &c. Accordingly give and grant unto Collo. Hugh Gwin three hundred Acres of Land Upon the west side of the tract of Land Called Gwins Island being the Surplussage of the said Island bounding as followeth South West upon the Narrowes west opposite to the Mouth of Peanketank rIver North and North North East upon a small Creeke and woods East and South East upon a Creeke South upon Deep Creeke which Iyeth toward the South side of the said Island, the said Land being due unto the said Collo. Gwyn by and for the transportation of Six persons into this Colony &c. To have and to hold &c. Yeilding and paying &c. -which payment is to be made Seven yeares after the first grant or Seating thereof and not before provided &c. -Dated the Sixth of December 1652
John Cookeley, George Pletsoe, Susan Parker, Nathanl. Waiters, Benja. Sarrow, Susan Hillary Mary Joyce, Peter Cade, One Negro Woman, Robert Wison al, Wisson Humph. Higgins
Land due for the five Last -Land Patented for four of the five, one remains still due being the Last. ---------------------------- Source book: Happy Valley and Echoes of Happy Valley by Felix Hickerson ------------------------------------- Gwin, Jesse Blaine. History of the Gwin Family. 1961. Fairfax, VA: N.P. FHL

VIRGINIA ---------- Col. Hugh Gwynne was an early settler in Gloucester County, Virginia and was a member of the Virginia House of Burgess[es] in Jamestown, 1652-1690. Some of the descendants of Hugh Gwynne changed their name to Gwin, Gwinn or Gwyn. Col. Hugh Gwynne was very prominent in the early Colonial days and was closely associated with the Washingtons, the Reades, the Randolphs, the Carters and other leaders of that time. The name Hugh Gwynne (Gwyn, Gwin) occurs frequently in the Colonial records. He is known to have owned, in addition to Gwynne Island, 6000 acres on the Potomac in Westmoreland County and 700 acres in Isle of Wight County. Not much is know about Col. Hugh Gwynne's family as Gloucester County records were destroyed by Media Research gives his children as Elizabeth, Hugh, and Rev. John. Rev. John came over in Cromwell's time and was pastor of Abington and Ware Parishes. He is recorded as the father of Edmund Gwin who married Lucy Bernard. They were the parents of Lucy and John Gwin. There may have been earlier arrivals of Gwin in America, but if so none of them represent permanent settlers. It is recorded in Americans of Gentle Birth that Capt. Peter Wynne, of the King's Council, came over with Capt. Newport on the ship Mary and Margaret. It should be repeated here that the Gwyns and Wynns are from the same family line in the Old World. Col. Edmund Gwin from Ireland was another early settler in Virginia. He went to Pittsylvania County and is reported to have been massacred by early Indians. It is known that at least some, and perhaps all the Gwins from Ireland originally came from Wales. Col. Edmund Gwin had a son, George Holmes Gwin, who died in 1796. . . .(page 12)

OTHER GWIN FAMILIES IN VIRGINIA . . . It is recorded in Biography and Souvenir of Georgia, p. 348, that three Guinn brothers came from Scotland in early Colonial days. Two of them settled in Virginia and the third, whose name we do not have, after a short residence in Virginia went to Tennessee. John Guinn, one of these brothers, went from Virginia to North Carolina. He was the father of Robert A. Guinn, whose son, Minor Guinn, was born in South Carolina but later moved to Georgia. . . (page 16)

NORTH CAROLINA ------- Several of the early Gwins are known to have settled in North Carolina, in addition to Robert Gwinn. Thomas Hickerson in his book Happy Valley, deals with the history of the Gwynns, Lenoirs and allied families in Yadkin Valley of North Carolina. It is evident that the Gwyns in that valley trace their ancestors back to Col. Hugh Gwynne of Gloucester County, Virginia, though the destruction of old Gloucester records during the two wars left gaps that make impossible the complete tracing of the Col. Hugh Gwynne family history. Hugh Gwyn, b. 1702, d. 1768, who lived at Gwynville on Gwynn Island and served for 42 years on the vestry of Kingston Parish, Virginia, in Matthews County, is considered to have been the grandson of Col. Hugh Gwynne. This Hugh Gwyn married first Peyton Humphry and second, Lucy Reade. A son of the first marriage was Richard Gwyn, b. 1738, d. 1777, who married Sarah Ransome. They moved to North Carolina and settled at Green Hill in the Yadkin Valley. There were early Gwyn settlers in Caswell County, North Carolina. Among the first recorded in the Land Deed Books is Daniel Gwyn, b. 1751, d. 1809 . . . . John Gwin married Sarah Harper, February 26, 1782, in Rowan County, North Carolinaa. In Orange County, North Carolina, the Will of Mordecai Gwinn, probated in 1785, lists his children as Edward, John, Mordecai, Mary, Sarah and Elizabeth. In Orange County the Will of Daniel Gwinn gives his children as William and Polly. Peter Gwin married Sarah Taylor, November 21, 1769, in Rowan County, North Carolina. (page 17)

MARYLAND --------- In addition to the Gwynns of Gwynn Island, whose descendants are found in Maryland, there is another line of descent from the Wynnes of Gwydir Castle, Wales, many of whose descendants are in Maryland and several in Baltimore. These are the descendants of Dr. Thomas Wynne, who came to Pennsylvania with William Penn in the ship Welcome in 1682. He is said to have been of Bron-Vadog near Caerwys, Wales, b. in 1630, son of Peter Wynne of Leewood and the Tower of Caerwys, Flintshire, Wales, and a descendant of Sir John Wynne of Gwydir Castle. (page 20) ------------- From a genforum.genealogy.com posting by David Gwynn on 28 June 2005: I have just discovered the Gwynn family entries here on Genealogy.com. As a Gwynn living in Wales, very close to the area where we believe the Gwynn's originated, I found much of the material in the messages posted here really interesting. Perhaps I could take some time to explain the origins of the Gwynns as I understand them. Much of this information comes from a now sadly deceased historian the Rev Latimer Davies. He carried out extensive research into the Gwynn family, aided by documents lent to him by my father (and as it happens never returned). Wales before the arrival of the Normans in the late eleventh century was not a united country. Instead it was a loose association of small independent principalities and lordships, all fiercely independent of spirit, but with borders that changed often as a result of war, marriage or treaty. One of these principalities was called Deheubarth and it covered an area roughly corresponding to the eastern part of the present county of Carmarthenshire and the western part of Glamorganshire (that is the Gower peninsula and the area west of the river Tawe). One of the early princes of Deheubarth was a particularly good and fair ruler, and earned the epithet 'pure' or 'white'. His name may have been Hywel (my memory lets me down here) so he would have been Hywely Gwyn. His sons would have carried the Welsh 'ap' for 'son of' - so for example, may have been called Rhodriap Hywely gwyn. One can see how this gradually, over the years became the surname Gwyn (or Gwynn or Gwynne or Gwyne). As contact was frequent with the Saxon rulers of England, so the need for proper surnames became necessary to settle land disputes, ownership matters etc. With the Norman conquest of Wales from the 1080s onwards, these small Welsh principalities were swept away. The ruling families, however, retained land and privileges, particularly if they co-operated with the Normans. In the 1300s, a Gwynn witnessed a legal document relating to the de Penrice family, who were landowners in Gower. This showed that the Gwynn's were still an important family in the area. In the 1700s various Gwynns owned several farms in Gower, another owned a public house. These people could write and read at a time when these skills were only found amongst the better off. There is too much information on the more recent Gwynn's living in Gower to list it all here. There is also information on connection between the Gwynn's and the Rice family. It would be nice to know who was the first Gwynn to get to the USA. There are other branches of the Gwynn family in this area - it was said that at one time there was a Gwynn in every parish in Gower and none of them were related! Seek back far enough, and of course, they all were related, albeit distantly. ----------------------------
One must always be skeptical of claims to a glorious and royal past. It was very popular in the 1920s for wealthy people to hire generalogists to find their royal origins. Many fraudulent genealogies are still in circulation from these efforts. Usually they began with a few proven generations and then made gigantic leaps back into European origins which could not be easily (or ever) verified. However, it does appear that the name Gwyn is an ancient Welsh name. Working our line backwards, we begin with Adam Harper Gwyn, born in 1825 in Woodford County, Kentucky and died in 1903 in Monroe County, Missouri. Adam married Elizabeth Brewer Holliday, youngest daughter of Joseph Holliday. Adam was the son of Joseph Gwyn and Nancy Brown. Joseph was born in 1771 in Gulford County, North Carolina and died in 1858 in Woodford County, Kentucky. That Joseph was the unborn son of Robert and Isabella Gwyn is evidenced by the family naming patterns (Robert and Isabella) and Joseph's sale of land in 1801 just before moving to Kentucky. Robert Gwinn and Andrew Flack, trustees, purchased land for a Presbyterian church in 1770. This same Andrew Flack was a bondsman for Joseph Gwyn when he married Nancy Brown--another link between Robert and Joseph. There was another Robert Gwynn in Guilford County at the same time. His will was probated in 1801 and listed wife Rachel, son John, daughters Isabel, Nelly, Polly. Witnesses were John Cunningham and Polk McGiboney. The name Isabel suggests a link back to Robert and Isabella--this could be their son Robert, although there is evidence that he moved to Christian County, Kentucky (Draper Manuscript). This Robert was a minor when his father died in 1771, so his age at death would have ranged from 29 to 50 years old. By the amount of property he owned, he was well-established. This line needs more research. I have always assumed that Robert came from Virginia because of the prevalence of Gwins/Gwyns in that state, but so far have not been able to make the linkage. Another reason for researching Virginia is that Joseph moved to Woodford County, Kentucky where there was another large family who spelled their name Guyn. This family is well-documented back to Virginia. Why would Joseph go, by himself apparently (his brother Robert went to Christian County) unless he had family there? Further research is needed on this line and will probably need to be done at the Guilford NC library. However, there were Gwyns early in North Carolina so it is possible that it is another line.

Gwynn’s Island is situated in Mathews County, Virginia, at the mouth of the Piankatank River on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay approximately 80 miles east of Richmond and the same distance north of Norfolk by road. About 4 miles long and 3/4 miles wide, the year round population is close to 800, although it seems more like 8000 in the summertime. Prior to the arrival of the colonists from Jamestown and Captain John Smith, little is known of its previous history. We do know that Indians inhabited the Island continuously from at least 10,000 BC as evidenced by the numerous artifacts...arrowheads, tools, pottery, beads etc...and many of these items are now in the Gwynn’s Island Museum.

In 1610(?) Hugh Gwynn, often referred to by some as Sir Hugh Gwynn, and by others as Colonel Hugh Gwynn (probably the latter) arrived in Jamestown possibly with members of his family. The name Gwynn is variously spelled as Gwin, Gwinn, Guinn, Wynn, Wynne or Winn. Of Welsh origin, the name Gwynn means “white” and can be traced back as direct descendants of Caractacus, son of King Cymbeline, one of the early kings in Wales. According to history, in 47 AD, Caractacus refused to submit to Claudius the Roman Emperor who conquered Britain. After inciting tribe after tribe to revolt, he finally surrendered to the Romans. Because of his nobility and the renown of his heroism, he gained the admiration and respect of Claudius and was allowed to remain in practical freedom in Rome. (See Gwynn’s Island & the Roman Connection at the Museum) In 1611(?), Hugh Gwynn was exploring the Chesapeake Bay and stopped at a small island at the mouth of the Piankatank River. Legend has it that he heard cries for help from an Indian girl who had fallen from her canoe. Seeing her about to sink, he dived in and pulled her to safety. When asked her name she replied “Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan", and in gratitude for saving her life she gave the island to Hugh Gwynn, hence the name Gwynn’s Island. besides, Hugh figured it was easier to spell Gwynn than Pocahontas. Chances are that Hugh Gwynn, like so many of his compatriots, claimed the Island in the name of the King, and settled in for the duration. What is now Mathews County was formed from Gloucester County in 1790, and Gloucester County was formed from York County in 1651 which itself was formed in 1634. In 1635, Colonel Hugh Gwynn made a claim to King Charles 1 of England for property on Gwynn’s Island, and was granted by patent 1700 acres, almost a quarter of the Island, in 1640. Why the time lag between his discovery of the Island in 1611 and 1640 we don’t know. He became a member of the House of Burgesses in 1652 from Gloucester and a leading vestryman in the church and died about 1654. He had also been a member from York County in 1639 and 1646, and a Justice in 1641. The name “Gwynn” is now extinct on Gwynn’s Island, much of the family having moved to North Carolina in the 19th century, but there are lineal descendants still living there. Gwynn is a fairly common name in the general area among both black slave descendants and whites. The Welsh influence on the Island is indicated not only by Gwynn, but also the name Edwards, and the fact that the body of water between the Island and the mainland coming in from the Bay is called Milford Haven, named after an old fishing town on the southwest coast of Wales. The Gwynns and the early settlers did a little farming, owned cattle, sheep and hogs and took advantage of the bounteous harvest from the surrounding waters. Slaves were brought to the island by the Gwynn's, the Keebles, the Reades and the Hudgins who also owned fairly large properties at that time. Gwynn’s Island played a small but significant part in the Revolutionary War. After Lord Dunmore, the last Colonial Governor of Virginia, was forced to leave Norfolk because of unrest and rebellion by the local population, he sailed up the Bay to Gwynn’s Island in 1776. He entrenched himself with 500 men, many runaway slaves, and several ships for many months. General Andrew Lewis was sent to dislodge him and set up fortifications on the mainland at what is now known as Cricket Hill and mounted his guns. Opening fire on Dunmore’s ship, he caused considerable damage. The fight was soon over and Dunmore and the remnants of his flotilla fled up the Bay to Maryland. They were rebuffed there and eventually left the Colonies and returned to England. The Revolutionary War was under way, and America would no longer be under British rule. Life continued on the Island with very few changes for the next 150 years. Sail changed to steam and in the early 1900's the first automobiles appeared, but transportation for many more years was by horse and buggy or boat. In August of 1933 a twelve foot wave rolled up the Chesapeake Bay from a terrible hurricane and caused major damage to the Island as well as to other areas. Fortunately no lives were lost but livestock, boats and buildings were swept away. It was a major disaster for the Islanders and it took several years to get back to normal. For many years during the late 1800s, early 1900's, access to the Island was by ferry, but in 1939 the Bridge was built and there would never be the sense of isolation from the mainland thereafter. Traditionally, the men of Gwynn’s Island have always gone “down to the sea in ships”. During World War II 40 Merchant Mariners from Mathews County including 10 Islanders gave their lives at sea, more per capita than anywhere else in the United States. If you would like to learn more about the Gwynn family, we recommend Happy Valley by Thomas Felix Hickerson. Out of print and hard to find, this is an authoritative reference. Can occasionally be found on the Web at www.abebooks.com or other good used book stores and will probably be expensive. Please note the apostrophe ‘S in Gwynn’s Island. For many years State and Federal maps & charts referred to it as Gwynn Island. Unfortunately some current publications still do. The late Mrs. Eleanor Respess, a native Islander, prevailed at great length to get it changed to Gwynn’s Island, saying “You don’t call it Martha Vineyard, so you don’t call it Gwynn Island!”

North Carolina Wills and Inventories Ralph Boozman's Will.
In The Name Of God Amen. The fift Day of January, In the Year of Our Lord, 1744-5 : I, Ralph Boozman , in the County of Perqs. , Husband Man, being In good Health and of Perfect Mind and Memory, Thanks be given unto God therefore, calling to mind the mortality of my Body & Knowing that it is Appointed for all men to Dye, do make & Ordain this my Last Will and Testiment: that is to Say, principally, and first of all, I give & Recommend my Soul Into the Hands of God yt gave it; And for my Body I Recommend it to ye: Earth, to be Buried In a Christien like & Decent Manner, at the Discretion of my Exs. And as Touching Such Worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to Bless me with in this Life, I Give, Devise, & Dispose of the Same In the following manner and firm: Imprimis. It is my Will & I do Order, That in the first place, all my Just Debts and Funeral Charges be paid & Satisfied. Item. I Give and Bequeath unto my Dearly beloved Sister, Mary Bullock , all & Singular the Lands, Messuagis and Tenements, to her, and after her Decease, to the Children of Joseph Bullock , and Thomas Bullock , (That is to Say) the Heirs of the sd: Joseph Bullock & Thomas Bullock , Whom I Likewise Constitute, make and Ordain my Sole Exs. of this my Last will & Testiment. Item. I Give & Bequeath unto Sarah the Daughter of my Sister, Mary Bullock , five pounds, Current money of this Province, & a Cow & Calf. Item. I Give & Bequeath unto my Beloved Sister, Mary Bullock , all my Household Goods and Moveables, and after her Decease to the Children of Joseph Bullock & Thomas Bullock as aforesd: And I do hereby Utterly Disallow, Revoke, and Disannul all and Every Other former Testaments, Wills, Legacies, Deed or Deeds of Gifts, and Exs: by me In any Ways before this Time Named, Willed and Bequeathed. Ratifying, and Confirming this and No Other, to be my Last Will and Testiment. In witness whereof, I Have hereunto Set my Hand and fixt my Seal the Day and Year above Written Signed, Sealed, Published, Pronounced, and Declared by the Said Ralph Boozman as his Last Will and Testiment, In the presence of us the Subscribers, Vizt: Joshua Hobart . (Seal) Jurt. James Sitteson, Junr. (Seal) Jurt. Hannah Sitteson . (Seal) North Carolina, Perquimans County . ss. January Court, anno Dom, 1750 . Present His Majestys Justices Then was the within will proved in Open Court by the Oaths of James Sitterson , and Hannah Sitterson , in due form of law and at the Same time Thomas Bullock , Executor to the Within will, was duly Qualified by taking the affirmation by law appointed to be taken by Executors Ordered that the Secretary or his Deputy of said province have Notice that Letters Testamentory issue thereon as the law Directs Test. Edmund Hatch, Cler. Cur Copied from Original Will filed in the Office of the Secretary of State

William Jones emerged from the realm of the unknown on 8 April 1674 with a land grant of 470 acres in Charles City Co., Virginia on the south s ide of the Appamattox River beginning at a corner formerly surveyed for Hercules Flood with 1700 yards of his land running along the Blackwater River. The grant was for the transportation of nine persons to the Colony of Virginia, including Wm. Jones. William's neighbors over time included Henry Batts, Robert Tucker, James Thweat, Edward Birchett, George and John Passmore, Robert Coleman, Henry Leadbeater (Ledbeter) and Franc is Poythress. The grants are on file in the Virginia Archives. No survey plats were found, but William's grant was about 3 miles SW of Birchett Estates shown on current maps and on the Blackwater River where I 2 95 crosses it. - about 1 mile SW of the Prince George Co. Court House. William Jones was in the Charles City Co. Order Book on a few occasion s. At the Court at Westover on 14 Feb 1678 on page 269, - Wm. Jones petitions for the admin. of the estate of Jno. Maine dec'd. Ordered that the sd. Jones and the relict take inventory and report and if sd. Widow does not object then the Jones shall have admin. In 1679 at Westover (north of the James) it was ordered that Wm. Jones and wife receive 4 days pay in the case of Fields vs Giles, and on page 3 87 of the 1679 records, Wm. Jones confesses judgmt. To Mr. Draton for 2 025 lbs. of tobacco. Another entry was made on 4 Dec 1693. William Jones, Sr. Recorded a deed (not found) to William Jones, Jr., and just four months later another land grant was made jointly to William Jones and two others. Wm. Jones, John Ledbeter and Francis Ledbeter were together, granted 3 00 acres in Charles City Co. on 20 April 1694 beginning and standing in the fork of Warwick Main Swamp . This swamp runs about 25 miles NW to S E to join the Blackwater River . The swamp forks at Hugh Lee's millpond and again 2 miles west of the millpond where highway 95 crosses Warwick Swamp . Hugh Lee owned 950 acres on and around his millpond, so the location of the Jones/Ledbeter/Ledbeter grant of 300 acres was most likely, but not positively, at the fork west of Lee's Millpond on maps. Two separate books on the Ledbetter Family, one by Kenneth E. Haughton, P h.D. and one by Roy C. Ledbetter and others, maintain that the daughter o f Henry Ledbeter and the sister of Francis and John Ledbeter was the wife of William Jones, Sr. This seems to be supported by the joint grant of 300 acres and the fact that one of this sons, either William, Jr., John or Robert appears to have named one of their children, - Ledbetter Jones. Ledbetter Jones was granted 167 acres on 22 June 1722 and 223 in Prince George Co. On 9 July 1724. So unless better data on this issue is found, William Jones's wife is accepted as Elizabeth Ledbetter Jones. South of the Warwick is Jones Hole Swamp running NW to SE from Charles City (Prince George Co. In 1703) into Surry Co. On 24 October 1701, William Jones, Senr. was granted 600 acres on both sides of the Nottoway River beginning where Jones Hole Swamp runs into the Nottoway River . On current maps, Belsches Millpond on Jones Hole Swamp flows into the Nottoway and 600 acres S and W of the millpond was William's land. Some neighbors were Thomas Wynn, Robert Hix, John Roberts and Lewis Green. Records of the Rent Rolls of Prince George Co. In 1704 show that William Jones, listed as William Sr. had 600 acres, and all of his sons had t heir own land in Prince Geogre Co. William, Jr. Had 230 acres. Henry had 200. Robert had 241 and John Jones had 350 acres at that time. William Jones, Senr.'s 600 acres were primarily in Surry Co., so that became his county of record. He died there in 1712 and filed a will as previously shown. .The above mentioned will of William Jones, Senr., Dec?d, was presented in court by Robert Jones, Executor there of whom made oaths thereto being proved by the oaths of Thomas Wynne and Robert Wynne witnesses there to the same was ordered to be recorded ___recorded by____. William Jones died within 18 miles of his first grant on the Blackwater, and he died only 25 miles from Jamestown, VA. William's son, Henry would move his family another 50 miles south in 1726 to land grants on the Roanoke River in NC. William Jones, Jr. and other members of the family also moved south, and many lived in Virginia counties along the N C line.

North Carolina
Richd G Gender: M (Male) State: North Carolina County: Rowan County Residence Year: 1780 Household Remarks: C. Craiges District Document: Lists of Taxable Property - 1778 [NC State Archives]; Call Number: C.R. 085.701.5; ; Page Number: 7; Family Number: 13
What doe the G stand got?

1840 Virginia
Pearce Guinn residence: Not Stated, Patrick, Virginia page number: 37 nara publication number: M704 nara roll number: 573 film number: 0029691 digital folder number: 004410827 image number: 00079

Virginia
William ap Thomas , a Welshman of Llangdock, was born about 1587 and came to Virginia about 1635 with his wife Elizabeth whom he married in 1611. Their children were Anne, William (1613-1665), Mary (Stone), Robert (1615-1679), John (1616-1710), and Ann (Parsons). His Elizabeth City County will was recorded in 1679. Their son, William Thomas, married Rebecca ________ . He was called "William of Yeocohose" and served as Burgess of Surry County in 1652. He received patents for land in Northumberland County and was Justice of the Peace there in 1656. In the third generation, John Thomas (1640-1719) married Elizabeth ________. Their home was in Northumberland County and their children were Richard (?-1748), who married I. Pendleton; William (1700-1738) who married M. Duggar; Peter; John, who married a Mary ______; and two daughters, Elizabeth and Jane. Peter Thomas (1684-1782), married Elizabeth ______. It is tempting to think her surname was Winn because her grandchildren and their descendents carried that name through the next several generations. Peter, David, and James may have been their sons. The next Peter Thomas (1734-1815), sometimes referred to as "Sr.", served as a private if the American Revolution. He married twice: first to Mary Sims; then, in 1789, to Hannah Wall. The names of their children included David Winn (1760-1842), Peter (who married M. Wall), Isham (-1789), Hubbard, and Mary Elizabeth (1768-1815), known as "Nancy". She married Littleberry Pearson. David Winn Thomas (c. 1760 - 1841) married, in 1790, Rebecca Brooks, daughter of Robert Brooks (1736-1804) and his first wife, Brambly Wade (1772-). In his will probated in 1842, he names his children as Allen, Bennett, Charles (deceased by that date), Stith, Jane, Robert, Leonard, David Winn, and John J. Leonard Thomas (1800-1842) married Lutincy "Tinsey" Winn Thomas in 1824. Surity for the marriage was Lewis Poythress, a surname long associated with the Wynne (Winn) family. Tinsey was probably a cousin of Leonard. A Mecklenburg County order book for the settlement of the property of Winn Thomas (Wynne Thomas) stipulates that the estate be divided between those entitled to his property: Wynn Thomas, Jr.; Lutincy Thomas, wife of Leonard Thomas, Tabitha Wesson, wife of Roderick Wesson, Mary Ann Perkinson, wife of John Perkinson; and Elizabeth Wesson, wife of Harrison Wesson. Other researchers believe that Wynn Thomas' wife was either a Poythress or a Cleaton. There are a few land records between Wynn Thomas and David Poythress. [Thanks to Cynthia Thomas Huggett for this information.] Their children included Robert Massenburg (1825-), Rhoda Ann (1830-1912), Sarah (1834-18884), and Jane B. (1838-1864). Leonard wrote a will in 1842 which was probated in 1846. He requests that his wife inherit his estate and that "the money I have loaned out shall be kept out at interest and that interest to be applied to the education of my youngest children, giving them a common English education and the principle to be equally divided amongst all my children." The last record of "Tinsey" was in the Mecklenburg County Death Register: May 18, 1878: TW Thomas, cause of death-burned, reported by FJ Ellis, son-in-law. She been a widow for more than 30 years. [Thanks again to CTH.] Her daughter, Rhoda Ann Thomas married John Ira Pearson, the grandson of "Nanny" Thomas Pearson. He died serving in the Confederate Army in 1862. She also remained a widow, dying half a century later in 1912.

WILL OF JACOB STRICKLAND,
Recorded May Term, 1790. Nash Cou nty, NC IN THE NAME OF GOD, AMEN, I Jacob Strickland of th e County of Nash, State of North Carolina, being of perfec t mind and memory, blessed be God for it, do make and ordai n this my last WILL AND TESTAMENT in the manner and form following: FURST (Sic) I recommend my soul into the hands o f God that gave it and my body a commend to be decently bur ied at the discretion of my executor hereafter named and a s for what estate it hath pleased God to bless me with I give as follows:-- Item:-- I give and bequeath unto my son El isha Strickland all my waring cloes (sic) after my death . I give also unto his son Isak(sic) Strickland one Negro B oy called Quan to him and his hares (sic) forever after my death. Item:-- I give unto my son Jacob Strickland a Negro man called Robin to him and his hares(sic) forever after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeath to my son Matthew Strickland five shillings lawful money. I also give to his daughter Mary Strickland a Negro girl named (illegible), (illegible) him and his hares (sic) forever after my death' Item:-- I give to son, Marke Strickland five silings (sic) . I also give to his son Ismel Strickland one Negro man called Hary to him and his hares after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeth to my son Hardy Stricland the plantation and all my land containing 362 acres to him and his hares (si c) forever after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeth to my grandson Theophelus Hickman one Negro man named Prince th at he hath in possession. Item:-- I give bequeth to my son Henry Strickland five shilings after my death. I also give to his son Carrolus Strickland one Negro boy called Iille gible) to him and his hares (sic) forever after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeth to my Granddaughter Creasy Hickman one Negro girl named Jude, she and her son Crus to her and her hares (sic) forever after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeth to my granddaughter, Sarah Hickman one feather be d and furniture after my death. Item:-- I give and bequeth to my son Soloman Strickland and my daughter Creasy Hickman all the remainder of my eastate unmentioned in the above legacies to be equally divided between them as they can a gree after my death. Item:-- I hereby nominate and appoint my son Marke Strickland fully and solely my Executor to my last will and testament inmanner my will is that if should happen and I should die when there is a crop on the ground that Marke Strickland should have the full power to divide with Hardy Strickland as my selfs give-back to our bargain wich is half of everything that is on the land. In witness whereof I do hereunto set my hand and assign this, my last will and testament, this 18 August 1788. JACOB STRICKLAND Signed and sealed by Jacob Strickland as his last will and teatament in the presence of us; Edward Nicholson Christopher Naylor William Marten (His Mark)


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