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Elizabeth Hume abt. 1760-1842, wife of Spiller and Mulberry
Posted by: John Newman (ID *****0051) Date: April 08, 2005 at 06:53:12
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Although no documentation has yet been found to prove it, this researcher believes that William Hume Sr. & Frances Pattishall of Stafford County, VA were the parents of Elizabeth Hume, the wife of Philip Spiller Jr. and John Mulberry.

Consider the following circumstantial evidence:

Elizabeth Hume married Philip Spiller Jr. in Fauquier County VA on 9 Sep 1782. (The surname was spelled "Spitler" in the marriage bond.) They had at least one child, a son named Thomas Spiller. Philip Spiller and his father of the same name were both listed in the 1790 personal tax lists of Fauquier County in 1790. By 1799, Philip Spiller Jr. was no longer listed. Link: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ysbinns/vataxlists/ (Type the name Spiller in that web site's search engine.)

Thomas Spiller testified in court in 1850 that his mother Elizabeth married John Mulberry in Scott County, KY on 22 Aug 1792, and that her first husband was Philip Spiller. This testimony was included in John Mulberry's Revolutionary War pension file, W9584.

When John Mulberry applied for the pension in 1818, he testified that his first enlistment "was in September 1775 at Stafford County near Falmouth" and that his second enlistment "was at the same place of the first." The second enlistment in the Continental Army resulted in him being "sent to a factory called Hunters Factory where muskets and arms were made, at which place or factory he stayed & was stationed until his time of three years expired where he was honorably discharged -- but he stayed at the factory for ten or twelve years." According to his 1820 testimony, John Mulberry's second enlistment commenced on September 1778. This seems to indicate that he stayed at "Hunters Factory" until at least 1791.

"Hunters Factory" was more commonly known as "Hunter Iron Works," a factory in Falmouth, VA (Stafford County) that indeed manufactured muskets and various other supplies for the patriot soldiers in the Revolutionary War.

Link: http://home.earthlink.net/~rschnorf/cmm/graves.html
Excerpt: James Hunter was the owner and operator of the Hunter Iron Works at Falmouth, which provided the overwhelming majority of muskets and iron cooking implements for the Virginia troops in the Revolutionary War. He produced: muskets, rifles, bayonets, swords, pistols, and large-bore wall guns. For the Virginia Navy he produced: anchors and ship fittings. He outfitted the Virginia troops who played a vital role in the Battle of Cowpens, and also those who were at Yorktown. Hunter's Iron Works were so valuable that Governor Thomas Jefferson ordered special military protection for the industry.

According to the book "Stafford County, Virginia: Tithables, Quit Rents, Personal Property Taxes and Related Lists and Petitions, 1723-1790 (in two volumes)" compiled by John Vogt & William Kethley, Jr., John Mulberry was taxed in Stafford County from 1785 until at least 1790.

In 1790, John Mulberry was at Falmouth in Stafford County and Mrs. Elizabeth (Hume) Spiller was in Fauquier County. How did they meet and get married two years later in Scott County, KY? This researcher suspects that Elizabeth returned home to her mother after Philip Spiller Jr. died sometime after 1790.
Mrs. Frances Hume paid personal taxes in Stafford County in 1787 & 1788 according to the above-mentioned book, "Stafford County, Virginia: Tithables, Quit Rents, Personal Property Taxes..." In fact, she was the only person named Hume who paid such taxes in all of Stafford County during that period!! Where did Frances Hume live in Stafford County? According to a 1946 submission to "Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine" (Vol. XXVII. No. 4) by Mrs. Clarence F. Smith, Sr., she resided "about 3 miles above the town of Falmouth."
Link: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~linnie/humtyl.htm
Excerpt: In the Virginia Herald of October 8, 1803, we find the following advertisement: "In pursuance of the last will and testament of Mrs. Frances Hume, dec'd, will be sold to the highest bidder for ready money, on Wednesday, the 14th of December, next, at the plantation where she resided, situated about 3 miles above the town of Falmouth, all the personal estate of the said Hume, to-wit: -12 likely negroes, 1 horse . . . Also on the same day will be offered at public sale the tract of land where the said Frances Hume lately lived, reputed to contain about 300 acres . . . Robert H. Hooe, Exec."

Considering the close proximity of John Mulberry and Frances Hume, this researcher strongly suspects that Elizabeth (Hume) Spiller was a daughter of Mrs. Frances (Patishall) Hume, widow of William Hume.
From the same web site, we see indirect proof that William Hume of Fauquier County was a son of William & Frances (Pattishall) Hume, and that this younger William Hume was paying taxes in Fauquier County by 1782 when Elizabeth married Philip Spiller Jr. This evidence, in turn, could help explain how Elizabeth Hume met Philip Spiller Jr.
Another fact worth considering is that Philip Spiller Sr. was a Baptist preacher. It's easy to imagine such a man travleing from county to county to spread the Gospel, taking his son with him. Philip Spiller Sr. was indeed imprisoned in Stafford County at least once, for presumably preaching without a license, according to the book "Imprisoned Preachers and Religious Liberty in Virginia" by Lewis Peyton Little. Link: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/LANE/1998-05/0894206801
In 1779, John Mulberry, Jacob Mulberry and John Mulberry Jr. all signed a petition to the Virginia House of Delegates to fix the court seat near the center of Stafford County. (William Hume also signed this petition.) Source: "Stafford County, Virginia: Tithables, Quit Rents, Personal Property Taxes..."

By 1790, Jacob Mulberry was listed in the 1790 Kentucky "Census" -- in Fayette County in 1789 & Woodford County in 1790. (Scott County was divided from Woodford County in 1792.) By 1800, Jacob and John Mulberry were listed in the Scott County, KY tax list.
Link: http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyscott/1800TaxListM-Z.htm

The father, John Mulberry Sr., died in Scott County, KY by 1798 according to Scott County Will Book A, p. 49. Link: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ky/scott/wills/m416-001.txt

Since Jacob Mulberry was already there, it's not surprising that John Mulberry and Elizabeth Hume-Spiller decided to get married in Scott County, KY and start a new life together. According to Thomas Spiller's testimony in John Mulberry's pension file, they were married by a Baptist preacher named Craig. (Like Philip Spiller Sr., Lewis Craig and Elijah Craig of Scott County, KY were also previously imprisoned in Virginia for their public preaching.)

The Mulberrys were indeed Baptists as evidenced by the following web site:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~kyscott/ScottChurches.htm

O. Clyde Donaldson, in his book titled "A Hume Chronicle: Andrew Hume of Fauquier County, Virginia: His Scottish Heritage and American Descendants," believed that William Hume (husband of Frances Pattishall) of Stafford County, Andrew Hume and Alexander Hume of Grainger County, TN were all sons of Alexander Home/Hume who died in Spotsylvania County, VA in 1760. Donaldson wrote: "There is no documentary proof that William, Andrew and Alexander Hume were children of Alexander, the son of James Home of Edinburgh who is known through correspondence of George Hume of Virginia (Hume's "A Colonial Scottish Jacobite Family", pags. 99, 109) to have settled in Virginia. However, all other known Humes living in the area have otherwise been accounted for. This and other evidence such as ages, dates, marriages, and land transactions, support the belief they were sons of Alexander, the immigrant."

If anyone has documentary evidence that can either prove or disprove these ideas, please submit them here. Thank you.


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