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Re: Packetts in USA
Posted by: Jason Packett (ID *****5574) Date: August 13, 2007 at 10:32:18
In Reply to: Packetts in USA by Jemma Packett of 34

My grandfather always told me that our forefathers helped settle Jamestown and ventured to Sabine Hall. Sabine Hall is in the Northern Neck of Virginia. I'm originally from that area. This would be early 1600's. Jamestown was settled in 1607. I haven't found any proof yet, but I have gone back 4 generations. I'm hoping to find more soon.

I would be interested to get what you have traced so far. I haven't connected the bridge between Va and England yet, but when I do, your information may help.

Origin:
"When the ancestors of the Packett family emigrated to England following the Norman Conquest in 1066 they brought their family name with them. They lived in Oxfordshire. The name, however, is a reference to Pachet, Normandy, the family's place of residence prior to the Norman Conquest of England in 1066.

Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in
nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Paget, Pagit, Pagitt, Pagett, Pagget, Paggett and others.

First found in Oxfordshire where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.
For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick,
poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed."



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