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Re: Re:MILNOR RUDULPH of New Mexico, 1870s-80s
Posted by: OhioGal (ID *****8761) Date: April 22, 2010 at 14:41:20
In Reply to: MILNOR RUDULPH of New Mexico, 1870s-80s by Robert Stahl of 3

Death of Mr. Tobias Rudulph.
Mr. Tobias Rudulph, a member of one of Cecil county's oldest families, and a
highly respected resident of this town, died at his residence on Main street
about one o'clock on Monday morning of heart disease. He had been kept awake by
the barking of dogs in the neighborhood, and a short time before he expired made
a remark to his wife about this disturbance. She shortly afterwards noticed him
breathing heavily. She endeavored to arouse him, and failing, procured a light
and found him insensible. Dr. H. H. Mitchell was at once summoned, but found
Mr. Rudulph dead.
The deceased was the fourth Tobias Rudulph and leaves a son of the same name.
He belonged to a family that has been distinguished by furnishing men, able as
soldiers, lawyers and merchants. The exact time of the appearance of the family
in this county is not known, but the first Tobias is known to have been engaged
in business at or near Elk Landing in 1745. He was one of several brothers who
emigrated from Alsace early in the last century. He afterwards was engaged in
merchandizing in Elkton, and build the historic old building two doors east of
the Court House in 1768.
This man was the father of Major John Rudulph, who with his cousin Captain
Michael Rudulph, served with distinction in the southern campaigns during the
revolutionary war under "Light Horse" Harry Lee. The major was sometimes called
"Fighting Jack," and the identical pair of old flint-lock horse-pistols which he
carried while in the army, are in the possession of the family. Michael
Rudulph, who like his brother, was known as a "Lion of the Legion," sailed from
Baltimore in the latter part of the last century as supercargo of a vessel
loaded with tobacco. The vessel has never been heard of since. Upon this,
supported by many other circumstances, is founded the theory that Michael
Rudulph and Michael Ney, Napoleon's celebrated marshall, "the bravest of the
brave," were one and the same person. The question will probably never be
settled.
The second Tobias Rudulph, a brother of John, was a merchant, and lived in the
old family mansion of Main street where the father of the deceased was born.
Tobias, the father of the deceased, was a prominent lawyer of this county. He
and his brother Zebulon both wrote poetry of considerable merit, and the former
wrote a drama entitled "Tanered." The father of the deceased died in 1828,
leaving four children. Of these Miss Annie Rudulph alone survives. He was
engaged in farming near town most of his life, but a few years ago sold his farm
and purchased a residence in town. A singular coincidence in regard to this
family is that each of the four Tobias's and also the fifth one of the name, the
son of the deceased were born in the month of December. Mr. Rudulph was of a
kindly and genial disposition, retiring and unobtrusive. He was about 62 years
old. He married Miss Mary Augusta Hasson, daughter of James Hasson of this
county, May 27th, 1862. Five children were the result of this union, all of
whom survive. They are Tobias, Charles, Robert, Annie and Louisa. They are all
unmarried, and lived with their parents.
Mrs. Garfield, widow of the late President Garfield, is a member of the
Rudulph family, her ancestor having emigrated from this county.
The funeral was held on Thursday morning from his late residence. Rev. J. P.
Otis, of the M. E. church officiated. The pall-bearers were James T.
McCullough, Thomas Drennen, P. C. Levis, H. P. Cleaver, Wm. R. Crow and John E.
Alexander. The interment was at the Presbyterian cemetery.


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