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Deadrick Outlaw
Posted by: pam Date: December 15, 2001 at 20:59:41
In Reply to: VanBuren Stepp Montgomery Co., TN by Pat Patterson of 978

Hi:
I wondered if Mullin, or Mullins might be the name you are looking for for your Milam?
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Also, I can't remember if it is you who was interested in the "Deadrick" in George Deadrick Outlaw's name but I ran across this article on Google just now and will post it here. Someone had mentioned the name "Deadrick" may have been of some prominence then.DR. THOMAS J. VAN DYKE at Fort South West Point
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source: Roots of Roane County, TN, by Snyder E. Roberts - page 51

SURGEON'S MATE AT S.W.P.

Dr. Thomas J. VAN DYKE was stationed at Fort South West Point as early as 1800, and was active in local politics and civil affairs. His records in Roane are limited, but enough information has been found to give a general understanding of the man. His position at the Fort and his marriage (probably 1799) placed him in a position to come in contact with the leaders in the area, and with dignitaries passing through. Governor John Sevier's "Commission Book 1796-1801" shows that Dr. VAN DYKE was commissioned a Justice of the Peace in Knox County November 7, 1799 during good behavior. His name does not appear on early Roane petitions, nor was he called for jury duty. He was not listed in the Roane 1802 Militia and Tax List, yet he paid taxes in 1802. This was probably due to his position as an officer, and the fact that he resided at the Fort.

SERVED AS A SECOND IN DUEL
Dr. VAN DYKE was evidently a man of courage, and did not hesitate to "become involved" if "right" demanded it of him. This attribute is illustrated by his role in the famous JUDGE ANDREW JACKSON- GOV. JOHN SEVIER duel at Kingston in 1803. It will be recalled in ANDREW GREER'S affidavit as an eye witness to the whole affair, Dr. VAN DYKE served as JACKSON'S second. After SEVIER'S horse bolted with his dueling pistols in the saddle bags, JACKSON advanced on SEVIER who sought refuge behind a tree. SEVIER'S son, advanced with drawn pistol to protect his father. With this turn of events, Dr. VAN DYKE advanced with drawn pistol. With this stalemate, the cuss-word battle bean, and ended when pistols were returned to their holsters, and all participants riding on their respective ways. ANDREW JACKSON never forgot a friend, and no doubt, he found ways to reward the young Dr. VAN DYKE for his bravery and support in time of trouble.

OWNED LOTS IN KINGSTON
By 1805, Dr. THOMAS VAN DYKE had bought lots No. 38 and No. 43 in Kingston, and a 3-acre tract nearby in the name of his three sons. His name appears on the Roane 1805 Tax List. In 1808, Dr. VAN DYKE sold (Book C., p 44) lots No. 38 and No. 43 to JOSEPH HAMILTON. This deed is worth mentioning because it includes a clear statement regarding the chain of title from the NC grant to ROBERT KING to Dr. VAN DYKE which clears a much discussed question. The deed reads, "Lots No. 38 and No. 43 being part of a tract grated by NC to ROBERT KING, and conveyed by said KING to JAMES MCCLUCHAN, and from him to said THOMAS J. VAN DYKE." The Doctor was also a slave holder because in Book B, p 29 he sold a Negro boy to SAMUEL WORD in 1805, and in Book B, p 188, he sold a Negro woman to ROBERT AULT in 1806.

TRUSTEE OF RITTENHOUSE ACADEMY
In 1806, Dr. VAN DYKE was serving as a Roane Justice of the Peace in Capt. DEAKIN'S Company of militia. The records of Rittenhouse Academy show Dr. VAN DYKE to be among the first Trustees of the school at Kingston. These original Trustees were named in a State Act passed in 1806.

DR. VAN DYKE MARRIES WELL
Wells' "History of Roane County" gives some pertinent facts relative to the Van Dyke family. THOMAS JAMES VAN DYKE was born in 1777 in Dover, Delaware. He studied medicine in Baltimore, MD and graduated in 1799. Dr. Van Dyke was appointed an ensign in the US Army and was later promoted to Captain. As noted above, he was serving as a surgeon at Fort South West Point by 1800. Between duels, politics, and his duties at the Fort, he found time to court and win in marriage the fair hand of JUDGE DAVID CAMPBELL's daughter, PENELOPE SMITH CAMPBELL (the ancestor of Penelope Johnson Allen who wrote a genealogical column for many years in a Chattanooga newspaper.) No doubt, JUDGE CAMPBELL influenced his young son-in-law in politics, and his marriage into this prominent family opened doors for social and career advancements.

THE VAN DYKE FAMILY
All of the children of Dr. and Penelope were born in Roane County. Their children were as follows:

1. ALEXANDER OUTLAW VAN DYKE b Jan. 16, 1800. Alexander enlisted in the US Navy and was lost at sea.

2. JEFFERSON CAMPBELL VAN DYKE b Jan 16, 1801 and died in 1862. He married ELIZA COOK.

3. THOMAS NIXON VAN DYKE b Jan 22, 1803. He married ELIZA ANN DEADERICK from an old and well-established East TN family. In 1847, the faltering Hiawassee Railroad Company elected T. NIXON VAN DYKE as its President. He was successful in gaining public confidence, paid off outstanding debts, and brought some semblance of order to its business and operations. By 1848, the name of the Company was changed to East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad. By 1852, the railroad was completed and in operation from Dalton, GA to Loudon, TN. Further reorganization took place, but on June 20, 1855, the first train ever to enter Knoxville puffed in on East Tennessee and Georgia tracks.

4. MARY HOUSTON VAN DYKE was born in 1805. She married GENERAL WILLIAM SMITH of Huntington, PA, and they settled at Mineral Point, Wisconsin.

5. ELIZA RHEA VAN DYKE was born in 1807. She married ______SCOTT of Lawrence County, AL.

In 1810 or 1811, Dr. Van Dyke moved his family to Washington, then the seat of Rhea County, where he practiced medicine. He received an appointment as Surgeon and served under GEN. DAUGHTERTY in two campaigns against the Indians in 1813-1814. Dr. THOMAS VAN DYKE died in 1814 while in camp at Fort Claiborne, AL






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