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Pioneer Tessier aka Lavigne
Posted by: Janet Manseau (ID *****2030) Date: May 15, 2011 at 11:46:35
  of 1317

Descendants of Arthur Tessier
Compiled by Janet Manseau Donaldson
Use as a guide

Generation No. 1

       1. Arthur1 Tessier was born about 1600 in Touraine, France. He married Jeanne Meine/Meme. She was born about 1600 in Touraine, France, and died 13 Mar 1648 in Château la Vallière, Touraine, France.
       
Child of Arthur Tessier and Jeanne Meine/Meme is:
+       2       i.       Urbain2 Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born about 1625 in Indre et Loire de Château la Vallière, Touraine, France; died 21 Mar 1689 in Montréal, QC.


Generation No. 2

       2. Urbain2 Tessier-dit-Lavigne (Arthur1 Tessier) was born about 1625 in Indre et Loire de Château la Vallière, Touraine, France, and died 21 Mar 1689 in Montréal, QC. He married Marie-Anne Archambault 28 Sep 1648 in Notre Dame de Québec City, QC, daughter of Jacques Archambault and Francoise Toureau/Tourault. She was born 24 Feb 1636 in Dompierre sur Mer, La Rochelle, Aunis, France, and died 16 Aug 1719 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.

Notes for Urbain Tessier-dit-Lavigne:
He was 42 years old in the 1666, 40 in the 1667 census and 55 in the 1681 Montréal census with his family.

Notes for Marie-Anne Archambault:
She came to New France with her parents.
       
Children of Urbain Tessier-dit-Lavigne and Marie-Anne Archambault are:
       3       i.       Charles3 Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 18 Jul 1649 in Montréal, QC; died 24 Jul 1649 in Montréal, QC.
       4       ii.       Paul Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 05 Feb 1651 in Montréal, QC; died 26 Apr 1730 in Longue Pointe, QC. He married Marie-Madeleine Cloutier 13 Oct 1681 in Château Richer, Montmorency, QC; born 23 Sep 1662 in Château Richer, Montmorency, QC; died 10 Feb 1748 in Long Pointe, Montréal, QC.
       5       iii.       Madeleine Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 19 Jul 1653 in Montréal, QC; died Bef. 1666 in Unknown, QC.
+       6       iv.       Laurent Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 03 Jun 1655 in Montréal, QC; died 27 Sep 1687 in Montréal, QC.
       7       v.       Marie-Louise Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 26 Mar 1657 in Montréal, QC; died 09 Apr 1727 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Pierre Payet-dit-St.Amour, (Pierre & M. Martin) 23 Nov 1671 in Montréal, QC; born about 1641 in Gascogne, France; died 25 Jan 1719 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
+       8       vi.       Agnes Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 23 Mar 1659 in Montréal, QC; died 24 Jan 1733 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       9       vii.       Urbain Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 07 Jun 1661 in Montréal, QC; died 24 Mar 1685 in Montréal, QC.
       10       viii.       Jean-Baptiste Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 14 Jun 1663 in Montréal, QC; died 06 Dec 1734 in Montréal, QC. He married (1) Jeanne Leber, (Francois & Jeanne Testard) 21 Nov 1686 in Laprairie, QC; born about 1671 in Unknown, QC; died 04 Dec 1687 in Laprairie, QC. He married (2) Louise Caron 21 Apr 1688 in Laprairie, QC; born 25 Jul 1674 in Ste. Anne de Beaupré, Montmorency, QC; died 13 Apr 1703 in Montréal, QC.
       11       ix.       Claude Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 25 Dec 1665 in Montréal, QC.
       12       x.       Jacques Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 24 May 1668 in Montréal, QC; died 23 Jun 1670 in Montréal, QC.
+       13       xi.       Petronille Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 18 Mar 1670 in Notre Dame de Montréal, QC; died 18 May 1751 in L'Enfant Jesus, Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       14       xii.       Jean-Baptiste Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 26 Jan 1672 in Montréal, QC; died 19 May 1736 in Longueuil, Chambly, QC. He married Elisabeth-Isabelle-Marie Renaud-dit-Desmoulins 04 Nov 1698 in Montréal, QC; born 09 Oct 1681 in Montréal, QC; died 11 Nov 1747 in Montréal, QC.
       15       xiii.       Pierre Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 21 Feb 1674 in Montréal, QC; died 23 Feb 1674 in Montréal, QC.
       16       xiv.       Jacques Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 02 Mar 1675 in Montréal, QC; died 07 May 1738 in Montréal, QC. He married Marie Adhemar-dit-St.Martin 10 May 1699 in Montréal, QC; born 28 Oct 1679 in Champlain, QC; died 17 May 1754 in Montréal, QC.
       17       xv.       Ignace Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 11 Mar 1677 in Montréal, QC; died 03 Mar 1747 in Repentigny, l'Assomption, QC. He married Marguerite-Marie Lussier/L'Huissier 23 May 1703 in Repentigny, l'Assomption, QC; born 03 Sep 1683 in Varennes, Vercheres, QC; died 07 May 1748 in Repentigny, l'Assomption, QC.
       18       xvi.       Nicolas Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born 17 Jun 1679 in Montréal, QC; died 03 Jan 1757 in Hôpital Général de Montréal, QC. He married Marie-Genevieve Auger-dit-Baron 27 Jan 1716 in Montréal, QC; born 22 Jan 1699 in Montréal, QC; died 30 Oct 1748 in Montréal, QC.


Generation No. 3

       6. Laurent3 Tessier-dit-Lavigne (Urbain2, Arthur1 Tessier) was born 03 Jun 1655 in Montréal, QC, and died 27 Sep 1687 in Montréal, QC. He married Anne Lemire 20 Oct 1681 in Québec City, QC, daughter of Jean Lemire and Louise Marsolet-dit-St.Agnan. She was born 13 Mar 1664 in Québec City, QC, and died 11 Jun 1750 in Montréal, QC.
       
Child of Laurent Tessier-dit-Lavigne and Anne Lemire is:
       19       i.       Marie-Anne4 Tessier-dit-Lavigne, born about 1685 in Unknown, QC; died 08 Jun 1723 in Montréal, QC. She married Pierre Gauthier-dit-St.Germain 15 May 1707 in Montréal, QC; born 09 Nov 1684 in Repentigny, l'Assomption, QC.


       8. Agnes3 Tessier-dit-Lavigne (Urbain2, Arthur1 Tessier) was born 23 Mar 1659 in Montréal, QC, and died 24 Jan 1733 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Guillaume Richard-dit-LaFleur 26 Nov 1675 in Montréal, QC, son of Jean Richard and Anne Meusnier. He was born about 1641 in Saintonge, France, and died 02 Jul 1690 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.

Notes for Guillaume Richard-dit-LaFleur:
His surname was Richard and his nickname was Lafleur. Lafleur was his military nickname. All French soldiers received a nickname when they enlisted in the army. In New France (Canada) there were 68 soldiers who carried the military nickname (nom de guerre) of Lafleur (the flower). None of these 68 soldiers were in the same company and all had a different surname. Duplication of "dit" names were not allowed within the same company. Lafleur is one of the most common family names in Québec. Jette found more that 60 families with this nickname. At the end of the 17th century, of over 100,000 nicknames of French soldiers found in the registration records at the Paris invalids Hospital, there were 1211 soldiers with the military nickname of Lafleur.
Guillaume was a Sargeant of the Garison of Montréal in 1674 and a lieutenant of the Malicia at Pointe aux Trembles in 1688 and 1690. He was killed by the Iroquois on 2 July 1690 and buried on 2 Nov 1694.
Guillaume Richard-dit-LaFleur was a soldier with the LaVerenne Company of the Carignan-Salières Regiment.
Here is a bit of history about the Carignan soldiers.
"Please Don’t Call It A Ship!" by Don Curley
While visiting Québec City and Cartier Brébeuf Park in the northeast section of the city, we came upon a wondrous site. On dry land, there was a replica of Cartier’s vessel, La Grande Hermine which was open to visitors1. (N.B. see footnote below) As I looked at that small craft, it brought back sharp memories of a year at sea on a U.S. Navy landing craft, twice as long, and all of the hazards of sailing the Atlantic Ocean were instantly recalled.

It’s been well more than 50 years since those days at sea and I can remember each of the severe storms; where we were, how long they lasted, how they approached our vessel and
what we did to lessen their impact. Then I thought how many people are able to appreciate the hazards and difficulties of the ocean voyage never having had a similar sea-going experience.

The ocean voyage from France to New France (Canada) was not an easy experience by any standard. Take a moment and think about this vessel, just how long and wide do you think it was? Our early emigrant ancestors embarked on a terribly small vessel/ craft (please, do not call it a ship) for a journey westward to a new life, a passage that would be frightening, dangerous and could even be fatal. An Atlantic crossing could take between three weeks and even more than three months.

When they arrived in New France/ Acadia, most of our ancestors experienced one or more of the difficulties in founding a new country. The attacks of the very hostile Iroquois, accidents and disease without medical help, childbirth almost alone in the wilderness, drawing water during a Canada winter, food supplies that might not arrive from France before the long winter, crop failures and other obstacles too numerous to consider. However, all experienced the very bitter cold of a northern winter and the most dangerous ocean voyage to New France/Acadia.

Consider some basic facts that apply in almost every crossing. The voyage would begin in early spring, after the winter storms subsided, to permit the vessel’s return to France in the fall before the following winter’s storms began. The vessels used were not large, replicas of those in common use during the period from the early 1600s to early 1700s can be visited in Quebec City. If Quebec City is not possible for those on the east coast, there are alternatives. The replicas at Plymouth, Mass. (Mayflower), Manteo, NC the Virginia Dare settlement2, and those at Williamsburg, VA are not the same, but very similar.

The wind powered these clumsy craft and our ancestors did not have a favorable following wind from France to New France. In general, the wind blows west to east and sailing into the wind makes for an extended passage. Storms, fortunately not as frequent in the summer, could slow the passage to some degree. Lack of a favorable wind was probably the most common problem encountered.
This small vessel,2 less than 80 feet long, would carry a crew of about twenty officers and sailors, about 80 passengers or more, and cargo for the year ahead. The “distinguished” passengers might obtain the use of the cabin above the main deck.

The majority of the passengers would be berthed on the ‘tween deck :in between the exposed main deck and the hold, where cargo and supplies were carried. Not every captain would permit free access to the main deck to “landsmen” and especially children. Keep in mind that to fall overboard from this slow-moving and difficult-to-maneuver vessel was almost certain to be fatal. Sailing the craft was in itself a very hard task which would be made even more difficult by the passengers who were in the way on the main deck “skylarking” about.

On the ‘tween deck, ventilation and light would be provided by the two open hatches leading up to the main deck. There were 4 to 6 ports in the side of the vessel that on calm days could infrequently be opened to provide additional ventilation. There were hammocks for the crew, perhaps some for the passengers, but most likely the majority of passengers slept on the hard deck. These were fairly short people, in general, so the minimal headroom on the ‘tween deck probably was not as difficult as today’s folk would find it. Drinking water would be carried in a wooden cask and would not improve with the passage of time and the heat of summer. The important folk might have wine to mix in to improve the water’s taste; the majority might mix with cider.3

There was no fresh water for washing, saltwater does not make for great cleanliness or comfort but it was available in great quantities. I will leave the minimal sanitation facilities to your imagination. The most important item was the supply of fresh water for drinking and, on an extended voyage, this was the most serious danger.

Food would be dried beans, grains, etc. although animals, and their feed and water, would be carried to provide some fresh meat, but only for a short period.

Fuel charcoal). would be required for the cooking fire but you can forget baking. Have you ever considered baking bread (the staple of a French diet on a small vessel pitching and rolling about on a huge ocean? Not very likely I’m sure. Flour would be full of insects in those damp conditions, ship’s biscuit hard tack. would be carried as a substitute.

After a few days no fresh vegetables and fruits were available. All the
conditions to cause outbreaks of dehydration, scurvy, and dysentery among the passengers and crew were in place. All vessels carried a cat not as a pet but to control the rat problem that was a constant threat in all vessels. Rats lived in the bilges, the very bottom of the hull where every bit of waste accumulated.

A nautical phrase that continues in everyday use, even on land, when a storm is approaching is “time to batten down the hatches.” The two open hatches on the vessel must be covered in heavy weather when the ocean waves build and water cascades onto the main deck. If the hatches were not sealed, water could flow down through the hatch into the hull. The vessel would become unmanageable and would sink.

When the storm approached, the passengers all being on the ‘tween deck, the heavy wooden hatch cover was placed over the hatch, then a piece of canvas, the battens, were then nailed over the canvas and the hatch cover into the hatch side. These folks were then confined in this dark, wet area :no vessel is without some leakage until the storm subsided. The very natural breathing process of 60 to 70 people in the confined space would provide enough moisture without any saltwater leakage from the storm.

To this add the effects of ‘mal de mer’, a French phrase that is so much more lyrical than the very graphic English ‘seasick.’ To be confined in this dark, wet, violent, cold space for several days might be very difficult to imagine, but your ancestors very likely did endure such conditions and survived.

To gain a better feeling of how very severe the effects of an Atlantic Ocean voyage were in 1665, read Gerald Lalonde’s description of the men in the Carignan Regiment.4 The words and phrases used by Gerald:
“standards were high, big and strong physically, fighting spirit mentally.” Then turn to Dave Toupin’s small piece on the Atlantic crossing of the last eight companies of the Carignan Regiment in the summer of 1665.5 They left LaRochelle on May 24 on board the Saint Sébastien and the Justice and arrived in Quebec City September 12. Of these vigorous healthy soldiers, 20 died during the voyage, another 130 were too weak to walk off the vessels, another 35 died from this latter group.

After 121 days at sea, that such a severe toll could be exacted from a group of healthy young men, consider the effects it undoubtedly had on pregnant women, children and the older people who made such a crossing.

If you have a reaction to some of the rather unpleasant aspects of this small vessel crossing the Atlantic Ocean, please also consider how this story began.
My year at sea was spent on board a United States Navy vessel the same width but twice as long with a crew of about 35 men. This is over 300 years later with engines, not sails, heat, electric lights, refrigerators, and a multitude of other technological advances. I clearly remember storms, the terrible tasting water, the poor diet, the constant dampness and so
on.

Stephen Ambrose, the distinguished historian, in his book "D Day, 6 June 1944,” quotes a Lt. Ryan describing his voyage to a Normandy Beach on a landing craft (sister to the one on which I served) using the phrases “roller coaster” and “bucking bronco” to describe his ocean crossing.

I would suggest you take a drive to the nearest playground, with a partner, get on a child’s seesaw and go up and down, not fast, but consistently for a good while. Then I would like you to consider that you do this for 24 hours, 36 hours, or even more. Think about laying down on this teeter board trying to go to sleep, or better yet, while going up and down, try eating and drinking. Taking this a step further, do this eating and drinking on a dark damp evening without light when it’s cool and you are wet from the rain.

I do hope that this story has caused you to pause for a moment to once again consider how much more respect our emigrant ancestors are due from us. The voyage was a common experience to all, some voyages may even have been comfortable and short. More likely they fell in the middle between comfortable and the very deadly crossing of the Carignan Regiment described before.

It is tough enough to imagine what the King’s Daughters must have been feeling when they left their home land in France to help in the colonization of New France, but consider what they must have been thinking when they finally stepped on solid ground after a crossing as described above! I doubt many considered turning around and going back home! It might even have been a primary consideration for our Carignan soldiers who chose to stay in New France after their service to the Crown was completed.


1La grande Hermine, 78 feet 9 inches long, 25 foot beam wide, round bottom, can be seen on dry land in Cartier Brebeuf National Park 415~694~0381, 175 Rue de l’Espinay, CP 2474 Postal Terminal Quebec, Quebec, Qc giK 7R3. (Ed. Note: The replica was demolished in Sept. 2001 much to the dismay of locals. I

2The Saint Jehan from LaRochelle to LaHeve/Port Royal in 1635; the shipping list still survives a crew of 18, and 78 passengers aboard.

3A quart of water per day per person, not a lot for cooking and drinking purposes, for 3 weeks 525 gallons, for 3 months 2,200 gallons. Drinking water could be collected in a rain storm in an old canvas sail not too clean and probably somewhat salt encrusted but it would helpT. A modern barrel holds 55 gallons for sizing estimates. Might some fish be caught to help alleviate the diet restrictions?

4"The Carignan-Salières Regiment” by Gerald R. Lalonde, ACGS #F1029 .C277 L212, published by ACGS.

5“Sent by the King” Vol. 4, Issue 1, pp.8, Journal of “La sociëté des files du roi et soldats du Carignan” by Dave Toupin.

American-Canadian Genealogist, Issue #93, Volume 28, 3rd Quarter, 2002




       
Child of Agnes Tessier-dit-Lavigne and Guillaume Richard-dit-LaFleur is:
       20       i.       Pierre4 Richard-dit-Lafleur, born 07 Aug 1678 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 12 Jan 1744 in L'Assomption, QC. He married Catherine Larrivee 11 Oct 1706 in Boucherville, Chambly, QC; born 27 Aug 1686 in Boucherville, Chambly, QC; died 17 Oct 1759 in Boucherville, Chambly, QC.


       13. Petronille3 Tessier-dit-Lavigne (Urbain2, Arthur1 Tessier) was born 18 Mar 1670 in Notre Dame de Montréal, QC, and died 18 May 1751 in L'Enfant Jesus, Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Pierre Janot-dit-Lachapelle 31 Jan 1684 in Montréal, QC, son of Marin Janot-dit-Lachapelle and Francoise Benard. He was born 27 Mar 1660 in Montréal, QC, and died 01 Jul 1725 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.

Notes for Pierre Janot-dit-Lachapelle:
He contracted to work out West on 20 May 1692. Pierre Janot dit LaChapelle and his brother Robert Janot dit LaChapelle were "out west". The Detroit area was considered out west. They were voyageurs and lived in Detroit under Cadillac.
In the Detroit directory it was recorded that "Pierre Janot went there on May 22, 1709 with the nephew of his brother Robert Janot.

http://www.archive.org/stream/cihm_02297/cihm_02297_djvu.txt

       
Children of Petronille Tessier-dit-Lavigne and Pierre Janot-dit-Lachapelle are:
       21       i.       Pierre4 Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 17 Feb 1685 in Montréal, QC; died 02 Apr 1770 in St. Charles sur Richelieu, QC. He married Marie-Madeleine Aubuchon-dit-Lesperance 10 Nov 1710 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 13 Feb 1684 in Montréal, QC; died 25 Jan 1760 in St. Charles sur Richelieu, QC.
       22       ii.       Antoine Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 07 Jan 1688 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 18 May 1746 in Longue Pointe, QC. He married Jeanne Galipeau, (Antoine & M. Francoise Cambin) 13 Jan 1720 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 31 Dec 1698 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 01 Oct 1733 in Longue Pointe, QC.
       23       iii.       Nicolas Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 26 Feb 1690 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 19 Apr 1742 in Longue Pointe, QC. He married Anne-Jeanne Senez-dit-Laliberte 20 Nov 1719 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 17 Dec 1698 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 29 Jun 1748 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       24       iv.       Jean-Baptiste Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 18 Mar 1692 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 11 Jan 1750 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. He married (1) Marie Galipeau 29 Jan 1714 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 22 Mar 1692 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 21 Jun 1721 in Cote St. Leonard, QC. He married (2) Marie-Marguerite Philippe-dit-Etienne-Durivage 19 Jan 1722 in Rivière des Prairies, QC; born 10 Aug 1699 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 13 Aug 1768 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       25       v.       Jacques Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 15 Jun 1694 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 18 Jun 1770 in Longue Pointe, QC. He married Marie-Marguerite Dufresne, (J.Bap. & M.R.Marsan) 28 Nov 1718 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 24 Feb 1703 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 21 Mar 1777 in Longue Pointe, QC.
       26       vi.       Marie Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 19 Apr 1696 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 03 Feb 1757 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Jacques Senez-dit-Laliberte 08 Nov 1717 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 03 May 1692 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 16 Jun 1751 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       27       vii.       Marie-Catherine Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 15 Mar 1698 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 13 Aug 1742 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Jean-Baptiste Galipeau, (Antoine & Marie Cambin) 03 Jul 1719 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 14 Mar 1696 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 27 Mar 1776 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       28       viii.       Joseph Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 22 Jan 1700 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       29       ix.       Andre Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 18 May 1702 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. He married Marie-Catherine Brouillet-dit-Bernard-Laviolette 15 Dec 1723 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 22 Aug 1702 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 10 Apr 1764 in Repentigny, l'Assomption, QC.
       30       x.       Marie-Petronille Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 27 Sep 1704 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 08 Jun 1774 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. She married Jean-Baptiste Bricault-dit-Lamarche 08 Nov 1723 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 27 Sep 1693 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 21 Apr 1764 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC.
       31       xi.       Laurent Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 09 Aug 1706 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 18 Nov 1784 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC. He married Marie-Anne Chartier-dit-Robert 29 Jan 1731 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 05 Jun 1712 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 26 Feb 1761 in Longue Pointe, QC.
       32       xii.       Charles Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 13 Jun 1708 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 23 Nov 1764 in Kaskaskia, QC. He married Marie-Francoise Lamy-dit-Defond 12 Feb 1743 in Kaskaskia, QC; born about 1724 in Unknown, QC.
       33       xiii.       Jean-Baptiste Janot-dit-Lachapelle, born 07 Jul 1713 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 25 Nov 1759 in L'Ancienne Lorette, QC. He married Genevieve-Anne-Charlotte-M. Renaud-dit-Planchar 11 Jan 1740 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; born 26 Jul 1717 in Pointe aux Trembles, Montréal, QC; died 05 Nov 1773 in St. Charles sur Richelieu, QC.

=======================
Hi, I have decided to post all my Québec pioneer ancestor at the different GenForums because a lot of individuals doing genealogy research don’t realize that their ancestors can be found as early as the 1600s.

My resources are limited because I live in Oregon. I hope that you use this information only as a guide. I welcome corrections and additions from anyone that has access to the original files.

Originally I paid a genealogy society to trace the direct lines for 6 of my 8 great grandparents. They used the books that were compiled by volunteers for each parish. Because so many individuals had the same name, I eventually found some errors in these books. Then I used Tanguay and found out that he may be about 75% right and Jette (that goes to 1730) is about 90% right. Then just as I thought that I was finished, I found PRDH (University of Montreal) and I believe that they may be 98% right and still make corrections to their records. They go up to 1799 for marriage contracts and 1850 for some deaths. Some people have the luxury of having the original records at their disposal. I do not have that and with 17,000 individuals in my data base, I can not afford to pay for copies of all the originals. At that point I confirmed every that I had with the records at PRDH. Whenever I say “about” for a birth date it means that PRDH did not find it or if it is in the 1800s, I did not look it up because of my lack of resources.

PRDH uses the most common spelling variation for the names. This makes it easier to trace the families. They do not always use the original name that appears on the contracts or birth records. That is ok with me, because many individuals before the 1900s could not sign their names and did not even care how others spelt it. As a result the same person’s name took on a variety of spellings. I also kept the “dit” (aka) names because eventually brothers from the same family, picked a different aka name. For a very small fee PRDH has all the Canadian records from 1600-1799 and some death dates up to 1850. Their records are about 18% accurate. They can be found at:
http://www.genealogie.umontreal.ca/en/leprdh.htm

As for the pioneers, I also used Peter Gagné’s English books on the single girls that arrived in New France between 1634 & 1662 and his book on the single girls that are referred to as the King’s Daughters that arrived between 1663 & 1673. These girls were recruited and paid by the King to go to New France (Québec) to get married and colonize the area.

For the 1800-1900s I paid to prove my direct lines. My data for their extended family come from people on the web. The program that I use does not allow for baptismal dates, so if I don’t have a birth date, I use the baptismal date. The same goes for death vs. burial dates and actual wedding vs. contract dates. The newer programs have these features, but I will not be going through 18,000 records to make the changes.

Use this information as a guide only. I view genealogy as a hobby and not as pure science. As for the stories, I got them all in French on the web and I translated them for my grandchildren. I had not read or spoken French in over 40 years, so it was difficult and may not be the best translation.

Enjoy, Janet



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