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Home: Surnames: Thorowgood Family Genealogy Forum

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A theory in the works, please read
Posted by: patsy ford childs (ID *****5101) Date: April 06, 2007 at 14:20:45
  of 15

A theory in the works.

John Chandler the Immigrant was between 9-10 yrs of age when he came to the colonies. There is no record of a parent being with him. Why would a nine year old boy travel clear on the other side of the world without a parent/guardian, unless he was an orphan and his guardian was already in the colonies, and his guardian was sponsoring/paying for his voyage?

A few months later Thomas Willoughby, Jr. age 9-10 yrs of age comes to the colonies to join his father Thomas Willoughby, Sr.

No more is known of John Chandler the Immigrant until about a dozen years later, where he is listed in the household/fort/whatever you want to call it as a “servant” of Thomas Willoughby, Jr. We are all pretty much in agreement that a “servant” did not have the same definition as today’s meaning. It is believed that John was something like a soldier, under Thomas Willoughby‘s roof.

So where was John Chandler all these years? He could very well have been living in the household of Thomas Willoughby, Sr. as an equal. Perhaps he and Thomas Jr. grew up together under the same roof. Why? Because they were cousins.

Perhaps, that is how John Chandler the Immigrant got to come to the colonies after Lord De La Ware/Delaware issued orders that no children or women were to come. (Joseph Barron Chandler).

The Willoughbys were wealthy and had some pull in England, and it’s very likely if Thomas wanted his nephew and his son over here, they got to come. Money & power talked back then, just as it does today.

Therefore, if John Chandler was connected to the family of Willoughby’s, it’s possible that he was an orphan, and when he reached his majority, he came into his inheritance. Otherwise, why would a woman in Elizabeth Lupo’s station marry so far below her. The Lupos were a well known family and weren’t lacking in money or prestige. This young widow woman could have had her pick of men in the colonies and in Europe. I believe that Albiano’s brother Phillip was still here, if so, he would have been the most likely to find her a “well placed husband.” not some lowly “servant” who didn’t have a pot to do you know what in.

I believe that John Chandler was an equal to Elizabeth Lupo. That is why they married, they were in the same class. That he wasn’t a penniless individual that he had means and is how John Chandler was able to amass so much land, etc. in such a short period of time.

Everyone seems to toss the Lupo’s daughter Temperance aside. What happened to her? Surely there was someone, her Uncle Phillip, a grandparent, uncles, someone to watch out for this child and to make sure that she inherited her share. Where was she? Why is there no mention of her, in the Chandler history except as an afterthought? Surely, she inherited part of her father’s estate if she was alive at the time of his death. No matter that some researchers want to just forget about her, she is still a half-sibling of any children that John Chandler and Elizabeth Lupo had. (and yes, she was Elizabeth Lupo when she married John Chandler)

Please stay with me. I am getting to my “other theory”.

Thomas Willoughby Jr., daughter Alice Willoughby, married Henry Sewell b. 1610. They have a few children, and those children have children, etc. After a few generations, we have Greenberry Sewell who married Martha Braswell. Three of their daughters marry Chandlers. Two of them Matilda Sewell married Linsey Chandler, and Malinda Sewell married Major Lewis Chandler, both sons of Richard Chandler and Charity Parks. The third sister, Mary Elizabeth Sewell married Oliver C. Chandler (who is from the Franklin Co. GA Chandlers that the “experts” say are no kin to Richard Chandler, which I don’t buy for a moment.)

Others in my Chandler/Sewell lines includes Mason, Thorowgood & Ganey, all on the Muster of 1624 Elizabeth Cittie, right alongside John Chandler the Immigrant. All living in the area, all very well documented families. Sewell Point, VA, Willoughby Bay, VA etc. named after these families.

So if we are to go by circumstantial evidence, location, time frame, etc. It seems very possible that this “John Chandler the Immigrant” stands a very strong chance of being of my Chandler line.

The first male Chandler in my line that I can vouch for at this time was Richard Chandler b. 1751 married to Martha Lindsey/Linsey (spelled both ways.) We also find Linsey in and amongst these other men listed above. This is an absolute!

A LIST OF PARTICIPANTS IN THE ROANOKE VOYAGES
THE ROANOKE ISLAND COLONISTS AND SUPPORT STAFF
THE 1585-6 COLONISTS
Iohn Linsey
John Chaundeler
James Mason
Peregrine Bertie, Lord Willoughby de Eresby

SIR FRANCIS DRAKE'S WEST INDIAN VOYAGE
(stopped over at Roanoke)
--- Thorowgood, gentleman

In my Chandler lines, I have the following surnames, all of which were in VA in the very early days either before the “killing winter”, during this winter, or very shortly afterwards.
Baker
Chandler
Ganey
Marriott*
Mason
Parks
Sewell*
Thorowgood
Warner*
Willoughby

These marked with an “asterick“, either lived in or moved across the river to Maryland during a governor’s term in office to escape some of his edicts. I’m not sure if some of the others moved or not, including Chandlers as there were several Chandlers in MD during this time period. After this governor’s death or removal from office (I’m not sure which), most of them moved back to VA, before heading to NC, SC, GA, etc.

Now if you look at records, you will find these surnames in the same areas throughout the early years of this country. There are marriages between some of these families, for several generations.

But if we are to believe the experts, my Chandlers have nothing to do with John Chandler the Immigrant. I disagree, I believe that my line of Chandlers have a very strong connection to John Chandler the Immigrant.

It’s just that so much possible misinformation has been published, that it is next to impossible to prove one way or the other. That is why I need all the help I can get from anyone who descends from any of these lines. Any marriages in your lines between any of these named above. Tax records, land records, witnesses, etc. every little tidbit, could be a piece of the puzzle. There are several of us working actively on this, trying to find the answer one way or the other.


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