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Re: George Mason Tiffany
Posted by: Angie Sullivan (ID *****6775) Date: December 02, 2007 at 15:04:18
In Reply to: Re: George Mason Tiffany by Max Tiffany of 1091

George Mason Tiffany-1GH6-DF is the 2nd great grand uncle of Angie Sullivan. Their common ancestors are George Tiffany-1PSP-CQ and Almira Whipple-1PSP-DW.
___________________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 30, 2007 -
Treasures of Pioneer History

Pioneer Tiffany was born January 31, 1850 in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. He crossed the plains in 1852 with his family. When he was seven years old his family moved to Provo, Utah County. The family camped that fall on the banks of the Provo river, then moved into the fort. This was during the time of the move South when Johnston's army marched into Utah. His father and older brother were in Echo Canyon as members of the Utah Militia.
One night my father and his brother Nelson were out playing with a crowd of young people. It was late and very dark when they started home. All at once flashes of light would come in front of them and all around them. Of course, they thought this was the light of the soldiers' smoking They thought the soldiers were going to sneak into their homes and do harm to them. They hurried right home and were all out of breath on arriving. Of course, their mother wanted to know why they were so excited. The boys replied "The light of the soldiers' smoking is out there—they followed us all the way home. The soldiers are coming!" Then they were told about the lightning bugs—they had never heard of them before. Now they knew it was not the soldiers' but the lightning bugs that they had seen flashing back and forth on this dark night.

As the boys grew older there was a July 4th celebration which was to be held at Provo. My father and his brother did not have pants [p.143] to wear to an occasion such as this and were feeling bad because they knew they could not go. Their mother said nothing, but was thinking a great deal of how or what she could do. All at once she remembered a new striped blue and white bedtick she had put away. She immediately got it out, ripped it up and made the boys each a pair of pants. Now they could go to the celebration and if you ever saw two happy boys—it was they. They were proud of those pants!

In the fall of 1873 George M. married Sarah York who was only fourteen years of age. They lived in his father's home for sometime. He was a brick maker by trade, having learned how to burn and mold fine bricks. In 1883 two of their children contracted measles. The little boy died April 21st, and the evening of his burial, April 23rd, their little girl, Jane, died. Two weeks later the mother gave birth to a son.
In 1884 they commenced their journey to Arizona where they had been called to help build the Salt River valley. The new colony needed a brickmaker; but, "the Yuma jail was so full of Mormon polygamists and there were so few left that father couldn't develop much of a brick building business in this country. Other men were in hiding. A. F. McDonald had escaped to Mexico with one of his wives. There were very few men left in the Salt River valley."

The Tiffanys pitched their tent on their lot and lived there the rest of the year. While living in this tent, father was still using the team and was going to work on the ditches above Mesa. One part of the road was curved and covered with brush. He was driving along when Charley Dana came riding along on a saddle horse and thought he would go ahead of father, so he whipped his horse and went past him, not knowing that father's horses would run away at the drop of a hat. They started running and broke loose from the wagon, but father never let go of the lines. He was dragged out of the wagon for quite a distance and was struck in the head by one of the horses' sharp shoes. This cut a gash above his ear. Charley Dana could see the team running, but could not see my father nor the wagon. He went back and found him in a pool of blood apparently dead. Then calling him by name, cussed him and worked with him for a long time. He took his felt hat to the canal six times, got it full of water and washed his face and hands before he ever saw a spark of life. Father's skull was fractured. They did not know what to do. He did not regain consciousness for hours.

My mother was in a delicate condition and a neighbor lady had to come and stay with her. She wanted mother to lie down and get some rest, but mother had the feeling that something was wrong with father and could not rest. About twelve o'clock a wagon drove up to the tent. Charley Dana and others with father came in. Father was limping. Mother said: "You don't need to limp, your leg is all right —it's your head that is hurt." She went to him and took off his hat and his head was a mass of blood. She helped him take off his coat [p.144] and his white shirt which was also covered with blood. This made her ill, but she fought it down and started doctoring him. When they had him resting, mother went out in the open under the stars, knelt down and askeel the Lord to heal father for she was a woman of faith and works. For weeks she fasted and prayed each day until after two o'clock. He was healed of his hurts but always deaf in one ear.

Pioneer Tiffany was called as a missionary to the Indians and for twenty-two years lived among them. He and his wife taught not only the Gospel, but also for four years he taught the Indian Church school while his wife taught the Indian day school for seven years, for which they never received any pay.
___________________________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on July 30, 2007 -

Tiffany, George Mason, Bishop of the Papago Ward, Maricopa Stake, Arizona, from 1891 to 1906, was born Jan. 31, 1850, in Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, a son of George Tiffany and Almyra Whipple. He was baptized in 1858, ordained a High Priest Dec. 19, 1885, by Charles L Robson, and ordained a Bishop Sept. 27, 1891, by John Henry Smith.
___________________________________________________-

Taken from ancestry.com on July 29, 2007 -

Encyclopedic History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
P
Paradise Ward
Sister Savage also acted as a teacher in the day school. Bishop Hinckley was succeeded in 1885 by Charles S. Peterson, who was succeeded shortly afterwards by Daniel P. Jones, who was succeeded in 1891 by George M. Tiffany, who acted until 1906. During his administration, Bishop Tiffany chose Lamanite brethren for his counselors and other ward offices, a custom which was followed quite closely by his successors. Bishop Tiffany was succeeded in 1906 by Isaac V. Rogers, who was succeeded in 1912 by Reaves A. Bird, who was succeeded in 1914 by Hyrum DeFries, who was succeeded in 1915 by Asa Y. Tiffany, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the Papago Ward had 297 members, including 85 children.
________________________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on June 16, 2007 -
The Tiffanys of America : history and genealogy

3203. vi. George, b. Delhi, N.Y., May 14, 1807; d. Provo, Utah, Jue 21, 1885; m. Almira Whipple (b. Sanford, N.Y., June 13, 1810; d. Provo, Utah, Frebruary 14, 1889). Children: 3320 Cynthia Jane, b. Newfield, N.Y., February 11, 1830; d. Nauvoo, Ill., October 6, 1847; 3321 Zenas, b. Newfield, N.Y., July 31, 1831; d. Henderson, Ill., December, 1845; 3322 Ira Patchin, b. Eaton, O., Feburary 14, 1835; m., Setpember 23, 1862, Mary Ann Davis (b. England, October 4, 1843; d. July 21, 1885); had (a) Ira Davis, b. July 26, 1863; m., in Salem, Utah, October 27, 1883, Joannah Hanks; (b) Zenas Williams, b. August 21, 1865; (c) Sylva Ann, b. November 14, 1867; m., in Springville, Vt., November 5, 1883, William Doremus; (d) Cynthias Jane, b. February 27, 1870; (e) Mary Elizabeth, b. May 22, 1871; d. November 5, 1887; (f) Almira, b. December 29, 1873; d. September 22, 1887; (g) Frank B., b. February 29, 1876; d. October 4, 1877; (h) Eliza, b. June 20, 1878; (i) George H., b. April 17, 1880; (j) Albert Henry, b. November 5, 1882; ; (k) Ray, b. July 21; d. September 26, 1885;

3323 Loyal Peck, b. Litchfield, O., July 27, 1837;

3324 Mary b. Nauvoo, Ill., December 18, 1847; d. there September 14, 1845;

3325 Almira Rebecca, b. Gardner Grove Ia., August 18, 1847; m., in Salt Lake City, Utah, October, 1863, Ciles Holden; had (a) Almira, b. August 8, 1865; d. same year; (Ruia H., b. October 21, 1866; m. in Manti, Utah, June 4, 1890, Martin L. Bushman; (c) Giles R., b. December 8, 1868; d. April 4, 1889; (d) George Tiffany, b. May 9, 1871; (e) Nellie May, b. December 30, 1875; (f) Burrell, b. June 29, 1876; d. March 15, 1881; (g) LeRoy, b. September 21, 1879; d. February 6, 1881; (h) Ivy Lenore, b. May 24, 1882; (i) Mira Dee, b. July 10, 1885; (j and k)

Page 168

Vera and Verna (twins), b. December 18, 1888; Verna d. Same day;

3326 George Mason, m., in Salt Lake City, Utah, Sarah Jane York; 3327 Nelson Whipple, m., in Salt Lake City, Utah, December 11, 1879, Nancy M. Beesley; had (all born in Provo, Utah) (a) Nelson W., b. September 11, 1880; (b) Florence, b. April 27, 1882; (c) Elathea, b. August 28, 1884; (d) Ida May, b. November 15, 1888; (e) Milton, b. May 8, 1892.
____________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 15, 2007 -

Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia
Volume 4
Stake and Ward Officers
Maricopa Stake
Turley, Marion William
Tiffany, George Mason, Bishop of the Papago Ward, Maricopa Stake, Arizona, from 1891 to 1906, was born Jan. 31, 1850, in Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, a son of George Tiffany and Almyra Whipple. He was baptized in 1858, ordained a High Priest Dec. 19, 1885, by Charles L Robson, and ordained a Bishop Sept. 27, 1891, by John Henry Smith.
_________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 25, 2004 -

Our Pioneer Heritage
Volume 3
A Treasury of Indian Stories
Twenty-Two Years Among the Indians
A Tribute
Baptism: It was hard for the Indians to understand just what baptism meant. One time, when Henry Rogers was president of this mission, he had the women make a number of white shirts as there were many men and boys who had requested baptism. Several months later Mr. Rogers, Mr. Tiffany and Valenzula were holding a meeting when the group of Indians asked to be rebaptized. Mr. Rogers asked them why rebaptism? The answer—each wanted a new white shirt.

Our Pioneer Heritage
Volume 3
A Treasury of Indian Stories
Twenty-Two Years Among the Indians
A Tribute

One other funeral at which Bishop Tiffany presided was that of an Indian who had been a Mormon but later became interested in the Presbyterian Church. The father wanted his boy to have a Latter-day Saint funeral, so the good bishop made a coffin and covered it with bleach, while his wife aided by a Sister Savage made a white suit. It was dark when they had finished their job. They had to cross the Salt River which was very dangerous at the height of the now rainy season. The Bishop and Valenzula took the coffin in a high-seated wagon while the two women followed in a buggy. The men crossed the river safely, but while the women were in midstream, the breast strap of the harness became unbuckled and fell across the horse's feet hobbling her. After a few frightening moments they reached the other side. It was nearly midnight when they arrived at the dead boy's home. Mrs. Tiffany had taught the Indian choir and they were beautiful singers. As they approached the home these four anxious people heard the choir singing "Oh, My Father." The funeral was held at this late hour and day was breaking when they arrived home the next morning.
_____________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 25, 2004 -
Treasures of Pioneer History <http://www.ancestry.com/search/srrd.asp?rd=db&dbid=3241>

Pioneer Tiffany was born January 31, 1850 in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. He crossed the plains in 1852 with his family. When he was seven years old his family moved to Provo, Utah County. The family camped that fall on the banks of the Provo river, then moved into the fort. This was during the time of the move South when Johnston's army marched into Utah. His father and older brother were in Echo Canyon as members of the Utah Militia. One night my father and his brother Nelson were out playing with a crowd of young people. It was late and very dark when they started home. All at once flashes of light would come in front of them and all around them. Of course, they thought this was the light of the soldiers' smoking They thought the soldiers were going to sneak into their homes and do harm to them. They hurried right home and were all out of breath on arriving. Of course, their mother wanted to know why they were so excited. The boys replied "The light of the soldiers' smoking is out there—they followed us all the way home. The soldiers are coming!" Then they were told about the lightning bugs—they had never heard of them before. Now they knew it was not the soldiers' but the lightning bugs that they had seen flashing back and forth on this dark night.

As the boys grew older there was a July 4th celebration which was to be held at Provo. My father and his brother did not have pants [p.143] to wear to an occasion such as this and were feeling bad because they knew they could not go. Their mother said nothing, but was thinking a great deal of how or what she could do. All at once she remembered a new striped blue and white bedtick she had put away. She immediately got it out, ripped it up and made the boys each a pair of pants. Now they could go to the celebration and if you ever saw two happy boys—it was they. They were proud of those pants!

In the fall of 1873 George M. married Sarah York who was only fourteen years of age. They lived in his father's home for sometime. He was a brick maker by trade, having learned how to burn and mold fine bricks. In 1883 two of their children contracted measles. The little boy died April 21st, and the evening of his burial, April 23rd, their little girl, Jane, died. Two weeks later the mother gave birth to a son. In 1884 they commenced their journey to Arizona where they had been called to help build the Salt River valley. The new colony needed a brickmaker; but, "the Yuma jail was so full of Mormon polygamists and there were so few left that father couldn't develop much of a brick building business in this country. Other men were in hiding. A. F. McDonald had escaped to Mexico with one of his wives. There were very few men left in the Salt River valley."

The Tiffanys pitched their tent on their lot and lived there the rest of the year. While living in this tent, father was still using the team and was going to work on the ditches above Mesa. One part of the road was curved and covered with brush. He was driving along when Charley Dana came riding along on a saddle horse and thought he would go ahead of father, so he whipped his horse and went past him, not knowing that father's horses would run away at the drop of a hat. They started running and broke loose from the wagon, but father never let go of the lines. He was dragged out of the wagon for quite a distance and was struck in the head by one of the horses' sharp shoes. This cut a gash above his ear. Charley Dana could see the team running, but could not see my father nor the wagon. He went back and found him in a pool of blood apparently dead. Then calling him by name, cussed him and worked with him for a long time. He took his felt hat to the canal six times, got it full of water and washed his face and hands before he ever saw a spark of life. Father's skull was fractured. They did not know what to do. He did not regain consciousness for hours. My mother was in a delicate condition and a neighbor lady had to come and stay with her. She wanted mother to lie down and get some rest, but mother had the feeling that something was wrong with father and could not rest. About twelve o'clock a wagon drove up to the tent. Charley Dana and others with father came in. Father was limping. Mother said: "You don't need to limp, your leg is all right —it's your head that is hurt." She went to him and took off his hat and his head was a mass of blood. She helped him take off his coat [p.144] and his white shirt which was also covered with blood. This made her ill, but she fought it down and started doctoring him. When they had him resting, mother went out in the open under the stars, knelt down and askeel the Lord to heal father for she was a woman of faith and works. For weeks she fasted and prayed each day until after two o'clock. He was healed of his hurts but always deaf in one ear.

Pioneer Tiffany was called as a missionary to the Indians and for twenty-two years lived among them. He and his wife taught not only the Gospel, but also for four years he taught the Indian Church school while his wife taught the Indian day school for seven years, for which they never received any pay.
______________________________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 1, 2004 -

1870 United States Federal Census

Geo Tiffany 63 M, W, Laborer 300, 200 New York
Almyra Tiffany 59 F, W, Keeping House New York
Loyal Tiffany 30 M, W, Laborer Ohio
George Tiffany 20 M, W, Laborer Iowa
Nelson Tiffany 18 M, W, Laborer Nebraska
______________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 1, 2004 -

1860 United States Federal Census
Household of Geo Tiffany

Geo Tiffany 53 1806 New York Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Male
Almira Tiffany 50 1809 New York Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Female
Ira Tiffany 25 1834 Ohio Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Male
Loyal Tiffany 23 1836 Ohio Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Male
Almira Tiffany 13 1846 Iowa Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Female
Geo Tiffany 10 1849 Iowa Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Male
Nelson Tiffany 8 1851 Utah Provo, Utah, Utah Territory Male
____________________________________________________________

Taken from ancestry.com on April 1, 2004 -
Utah Cemetery Inventory

Name: George Mason Tiffany
Gender: M
Birth Date: 31 January 1850
Death Date: 14 March 1909
Death Place: Provo, Utah
Burial Date: 0 March 1909
Cemetery: Provo City Cemetery
Source: Sexton Grave
Location: Block 1 Lot 85
Relatives: Spouse Sarah Jane York Tiffany
____________________________________________

Taken from http://www.xmission.com/~nelsonb/nmsrch.cgi on August 14, 2003 -

Surname: tiffany
First:
Emigration Year: Any

Tiffany, George, 1850, NA, NA, 1850 Iowa Census Pottawattamie Co Kanesville Pct p.16 US/CAN Microfilm 442963
Tiffany, George, 1850, NA, NA, 1850 Iowa Census Pottawattamie Co Kanesville Pct p.20 US/CAN Microfilm 442963
Tiffany, George Mason, 1852, 2, NA, Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol. 1, Page 142
Tiffany, Sally, 1848, 58, NA, Roster found in Heart Throbs of the West, Volume 9, Pages 469-521
____________________________________________________

Taken from LDS Collector's Library on January 15, 2003 -

Tiffany, George (Male)
Birth: Tiffany, George (Male)       Date: May 4, 1807       Place: Delhi, Delaware, NY, USA       Alternate Date: May 14, 1808       Alternate Date: May 14, 1807
Parents: Tiffany, George (Male)       Father: Tiffany, George       Mother: Mason, Mary
Death: Tiffany, George (Male)       Date: June 21, 1885       Place: Provo, Utah, UT, USA
Marriage Information: Tiffany, George (Male)       Spouse: Whipple, Almira       Date: 1829       Place: New York, USA
Children: Tiffany, George (Male)
Name:       Birthdate:       Place:
1. Tiffany, Cynthia       February 2, 1830       Newfield, Tompkins, NY, USA
2. Tiffany, Zenos       July 31, 1831       Newfield, Tompkins, NY, USA
3. Tiffany, Ira Patchen       February 14, 1835       Eaton, Preble, OH, USA
4. Tiffany, Loyal Peck       July 27, 1837       Litchfield, Medina, OH, USA
5. Tiffany, Mary       December 1844       Nauvoo, Hancock, IL, USA
6. Tiffany, Almira Rebecca       August 18, 1847       Garden Grove, Decatur, IA, USA
7. Tiffany, George Mason       January 31, 1850       Springville, Linn, IA, USA
8. Tiffany, Nelson Whipple       August 6, 1852       Fort Laramie, Laramie, WY, USA
Church Ordinance Data: Tiffany, George (Male)       Ordained Elder
Temple Ordinance Data: Tiffany, George (Male)       Baptism       Date: May 8, 1969       Temple: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT, USA
       Endowment       Date: February 1846
       Sealed to Spouse       Date: October 31, 1872
Sealed to Parents       Date: October 24, 1972       Temple: Provo, Utah, UT, USA
       Sealed to Parents       Date: August 25, 1981       Temple: Washington, D.C., USA
Places of Residence: Tiffany, George (Male)       Provo, Utah, UT, USA; 1860, 1870
Vocations: Tiffany, George (Male)       Laborer; 1860, 1870
Comments: Tiffany, George (Male)In 1860 George had a household of seven, with a real wealth of $350 and a personal wealth of $400.
In 1870 he had a household of six, with a real wealth of $300 and a personal wealth of $300.
____________________________________

Taken from familysearch.com on January 6, 2003 -

Individual Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19
George Mason TIFFANY (AFN: 1GH6-DF) Pedigree
Sex: M Family
Event(s):
Birth: 31 Jan 1850
Springville, Pottawattamie, Ia
Christening: 8 Feb 1850
Springville, Pttwtt, Ia
Death: 14 Mar 1909
Provo, Utah, Ut
Burial: 17 Mar 1909
Provo Cemetery, Provo, Utah, Ut
Parents:
Father: George TIFFANY (AFN: 1PSP-CQ) Family
Mother: Almira WHIPPLE (AFN: 1PSP-DW)
Marriage(s):
Spouse: Sarah Jane YORK (AFN: 1GH6-FL) Family
Marriage: 10 Nov 1873
Endowment House, Salt Lake City, Utah, Utah
_____________________________________

Taken from familysearch.com on January 6, 2003 -
Family Group Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19
Download GEDCOM

Husband's Name
George TIFFANY (AFN:1PSP-CQ) Pedigree
Born: 14 May 1807 Place: Delhi, Delaware, Ny
Died: 21 Jun 1885 Place: Provo, Utah, Ut
Buried: 23 Jun 1885 Place: Provo Cem., Provo, Utah, Ut
Married: 1829 Place: Ny
Father: George TIFFANY (AFN:2VGS-95) Family
Mother: Mary MASON (AFN:BF3S-11)

Wife's Name
Almira WHIPPLE (AFN:1PSP-DW) Pedigree
Born: 13 Jun 1810 Place: Sanford, Broome, Ny
Died: 4 Feb 1889 Place: Provo, Utah, Ut
Buried: 17 Feb 1889 Place: Provo Cemetery, Provo, Utah, Ut
Married: 1829 Place: Ny
Father: Daniel WHIPPLE (AFN:2KBG-K4) Family
Mother: Mary TIFFANY (AFN:2KBG-L9)

Children
1. Sex Name
M George Mason TIFFANY (AFN:1GH6-DF) Pedigree
Born: 31 Jan 1850 Place: Springville, Pottawattamie, Ia
Christened: 8 Feb 1850 Place: Springville, Pttwtt, Ia
Died: 14 Mar 1909 Place: Provo, Utah, Ut
Buried: 17 Mar 1909 Place: Provo Cemetery, Provo, Utah, Ut
2. Sex Name
F Cynthia Jane TIFFANY (AFN:2PGG-HG) Pedigree
Born: 2 Feb 1830 Place: Newfield, Tomkins, Ny
Died: 6 Oct 1845 Place: Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
Buried: Place: , , Iowa
3. Sex Name
M Ira Patchen TIFFANY (AFN:1MNK-ZQ) Pedigree
Born: 14 Feb 1835 Place: Eaton, Lorain, Oh
Died: 21 Mar 1905 Place: Salem, Utah, Ut
Buried: 24 Mar 1905 Place: Salem, Utah, Utah
4. Sex Name
M Loyal Peck TIFFANY (AFN:1PSP-XN) Pedigree
Born: 27 Jul 1837 Place: Litchfield, Medina, Oh
Died: 13 Feb 1903 Place:
Buried: Feb Place:
5. Sex Name
M Zenos TIFFANY (AFN:1PSP-WH) Pedigree
Born: 31 Jul 1831 Place: Newfield, Tomkins, Ny
Died: Dec 1843 Place: Nauvoo, , Illinois
Buried: Place: Nauvoo, , Illinois
6. Sex Name
M Nelson Whipple TIFFANY (AFN:1PSQ-00) Pedigree
Born: 6 Aug 1852 Place: Fort Larramie, Goshen, Wy
Died: 20 Jan 1927 Place: Provo, Utah County, Utah
7. Sex Name
F Almira Rebecca TIFFANY (AFN:1CXK-BQ) Pedigree
Born: 18 Aug 1847 Place: Garden Grove, Decatur, Ia
Died: 23 Nov 1914 Place: Provo, Utah, Ut
Buried: 25 Nov 1914 Place: Provo, Utah, Ut
8. Sex Name
F Mary TIFFANY (AFN:1PSP-ZT) Pedigree
Born: 18 Dec 1844 Place: Nauvoo, Hancock, Il
Died: 14 Dec 1845 Place: Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
Buried: Place: Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
__________________________________

Taken from familysearch.com on January 6, 2003 -
FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0 North America
Family Group Record

Husband
George Tiffany Pedigree
Birth:
Christening:
Marriage:
Death:
Burial:

Wife
Almira Whipple Tiffany Pedigree
Birth:
Christening:
Marriage:
Death:
Burial:

Children
1. Cynthia Jane Tiffany Pedigree
<Female>
Birth: 11 FEB 1830 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: 06 OCT 1843 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:

2. Zenas Tiffany Pedigree
<Male>
Birth: 31 JUL 1831 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: DEC 1845 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:

3. Ira Patchin Tiffany Pedigree
<Male>
Birth: 14 FEB 1835 Eaton, Preble, Ohio
Christening:
Death: 23 MAR 1905 <Eaton, Preble, Ohio>
Burial:

4. Unavailable Pedigree

5. Mary Tiffany Pedigree
<Female>
Birth: 18 DEC 1844 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
Christening:
Death: 14 SEP 1845 <Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois>
Burial:

6. Almira Rebecca Tiffany Holden Pedigree
<Female>
Birth: 18 AUG 1847 Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa
Christening:
Death: 28 NOV 1814 <Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa>
Burial:

7. George Mason Tiffany Pedigree
<Male>
Birth: 31 JAN 1850 Springville,Potto, , , Iowa
Christening:
Death: 14 MAR 1909 <Springville,Potto, , , Iowa>
Burial:

8. Nelson Whipple Tiffany Pedigree
<Male>
Birth: 06 MAY 1852 Fort Laramie, , , Nebraska
Christening:
Death: 20 JAN 1927 <Fort Laramie, , , Nebraska>
Burial:
___________________________________

Taken from familysearch.com on January 6, 2003 -
FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0 North America
Family Group Record

Husband
George Tiffany Pedigree

Birth: 14 MAY 1807 Delhi, Delaware, New York
Christening:
Marriage: 1829 , , New York
Death: 21 JUN 1885 Provo, Utah, Utah
Burial: Provo, Utah, Utah
Father: George Tiffany Family
Mother: Mary Mason

Wife
Almira Whipple Pedigree
Birth: 13 JUN 1810 Sanford, Broome, New York
Christening:
Marriage: 1829 , , New York
Death: 04 FEB 1889 Provo, Utah, Utah
Burial: Provo, Utah, Utah
Father: Daniel Whipple Family
Mother: Mary Tiffany

Children
1. Cynthia Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: 02 FEB 1830 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: 06 OCT 1845 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:

2. Zenos Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 31 JUL 1831 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: DEC 1843 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:

3. Ira Patchen Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 14 FEB 1835 Eaton, , Lorain, Ohio
Christening:
Death: MAR 1905 <Eaton, , Lorain, Ohio>
Burial:

4. Loyal Peck Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 27 JUL 1837 Littlefield, Modena, Stark, Illinois
Christening:
Death:
Burial:

5. Mary Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: DEC 1844 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
Christening:
Death: 14 DEC 1845 <Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois>
Burial:

6. Almira Rebecca Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: 18 AUG 1847 Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa
Christening:
Death:
Burial:

7. George Mason Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 31 JAN 1850 Springville, Pottawattamie, Iowa
Christening:
Death: 14 MAR 1909 <Springville, Pottawattamie, Iowa>
Burial:

8. Nelson Whipple Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 06 AUG 1852 Fort Larramie, , Goshen, Wyoming
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
________________________________

Taken from http://www.xmission.com/~nelsonb/nmsrch.cgi -
January 5, 2003 -

Surname: Tiffany
First: George
Emigration Year: Any

Tiffany, George Mason, 1852, 2, NA, Treasures of Pioneer History, Vol. 1, Page 142
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Taken from ancestry.com on December 10, 2002 -

The Tiffany - Hungerford and Related Families of America
Entries: 11796 Updated: Mon Dec 2 14:13:09 2002 Contact: Peggy Tiffany Isbell Home Page: The Tiffany-Hungerford Family of New England
Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Add Post-em
* ID: I08325
* Name: George Mason TIFFANY
* Sex: M
* Birth: 31 JAN 1850 in Springville (Pottowatamie Co.) Iowa
* Death: 14 MAR 1909 in Salt Lake City (Salt Lake Co.) Utah

Father: George TIFFANY b: 14 MAY 1807 in Delhi (Delaware Co.) New York
Mother: Almira WHIPPLE b: 13 JUN 1810 in Sanford (Broome Co.) New York

Marriage 1 Sarah Jane YORK b: 18 FEB 1859 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
* Married: 10 NOV 1873 in Salt Lake City (Utah Co.) Utah

Children
1. [Has Children] Mary Ellen TIFFANY b: 22 AUG 1874 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
2. [Has No Children] Sarah Jane TIFFANY b: 16 APR 1876 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
3. [Has No Children] George Mason TIFFANY , Jr. b: 17 NOV 1877 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
4. [Has Children] Asa York TIFFANY b: 24 FEB 1881 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
5. [Has No Children] Ira TIFFANY b: 7 MAY 1883 in Provo (Utah Co.) Utah
6. [Has Children] Nelson TIFFANY b: 4 AUG 1885 in Lehi (Maricopa Co.) Arizona
7. [Has Children] Almira TIFFANY b: 16 SEP 1888 in Lehi (Maricopa Co.) Arizona
8. [Has Children] Ruia TIFFANY b: 27 NOV 1890 in Lehi (Maricopa Co.) Arizona
9. [Has No Children] Lenore Henrietta DEL TIFFANY b: 9 AUG 1893 in Lehi (Maricopa Co.) Arizona
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Taken from ancestry.com on December 10, 2002 -

An Enduring Legacy [Print]
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An Enduring Legacy
An Enduring Legacy: Volume Twelve
Missions To the Indians
Twenty-Two Years Among the Indians

Papago Ward, Maricopa Stake, Arizona, is composed chiefly of Indians residing in the Papago Indian Reservation in Salt River Valley, Maricopa County. These Indians belong chiefly to the Pima and Maricopa tribes which have been known to the Latter-day Saints since 1846 when the Mormon Battalion passed through Arizona en route from the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast. Later, missionaries labored among them with considerable success and many of them were baptized. Among these missionaries was George Mason Tiffany, a Utah pioneer of 1852, and his wife, Sarah Jane York Tiffany , who spent twenty-two years, from 1884 to 1906, teaching the Indians. On September 27, 1891, he became bishop of Papago Ward. Incarcion Valenzula was the Indian interpreter, but George soon learned to speak both the SpAnish and Indian languages.
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Taken from ancestry.com on December 10, 2002 -

Encyclopaedic History of the LDS Church [Print]
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Encyclopedic History of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints P
Paradise Ward

Sister Savage also acted as a teacher in the day school. Bishop Hinckley was succeeded in 1885 by Charles S. Peterson, who was succeeded shortly afterwards by Daniel P. Jones, who was succeeded in 1891 by George M. Tiffany, who acted until 1906. During his administration, Bishop Tiffany chose Lamanite brethren for his counselors and other ward offices, a custom which was followed quite closely by his successors. Bishop Tiffany was succeeded in 1906 by Isaac V. Rogers, who was succeeded in 1912 by Reaves A. Bird, who was succeeded in 1914 by Hyrum DeFries, who was succeeded in 1915 by Asa Y. Tiffany, who presided Dec. 31, 1930. On that date the Papago Ward had 297 members, including 85 children.
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Taken from December 10, 2002 -
LDS Biographical Encyclopedia [Print]
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<http://commentimages.ancestry.com/daexec?f=image&h=889ff92f68429cedfb1bfe4b196387b1&db=ldsbio> <http://search.ancestry.com/images/dotclear.gif>
Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia
Volume 4
Stake and Ward Officers
Maricopa Stake
Turley, Marion William

Tiffany, George Mason, Bishop of the Papago Ward, Maricopa Stake, Arizona, from 1891 to 1906, was born Jan. 31, 1850, in Pottawattamie Co., Iowa, a son of George Tiffany and Almyra Whipple. He was baptized in 1858, ordained a High Priest Dec. 19, 1885, by Charles L Robson, and ordained a Bishop Sept. 27, 1891, by John Henry Smith.
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Taken from Personal Ancestral File on 5/20/2001 - AFN: 1GH6-DF

George Mason Tiffany

Our Pioneer Heritage
Volume 3
A Treasury of Indian Stories
Twenty-Two Years Among the Indians
A Tribute

Papago Ward, Maricopa Stake, Arizona, is composed chiefly of Indians residing on the Papago
Indian Reservation in Salt River Valley, Maricopa county. These Indians belong chiefly to the Pima
and Maricopa tribes which have been known to the Latter-day Saints since 1864 when the
Mormon Battalion passed through Arizona en route from the Missouri River to the Pacific coast. Later, missionaries labored among them with considerable success and many of them were
baptized. Among these missionaries was George Mason Tiffany, a Utah pioneer of 1852 and his
wife, Sarah Jane York Tiffany, who spent twenty-two years, from 1884 to 1906, teaching the
Indians. On September 27, 1891 he became bishop of Papago Ward. Incarcion Valenzula was the
Indian interpreter but George soon learned to speak both the Spanish and Indian languages.

As a child Sarah Jane had been stolen by the Indians. While living in Provo one of her aunts
jokingly told an indian, Ankety Watts, that he could have the little girl. The Indian immediately
seized her and started running but was stopped by a neighbor before he had gone very far. It
left such a lasting impression that she never quite overcame her fear of the redmen. However,
through the experiences gained on this mission, she learned to understand their way of life.

Indian Funeral: The first funeral Mrs. Tiffany attended was that of the seventeen year old son of
Valenzula. The boy came to his father's home very ill and when they realized he could not live,
Indian runners were sent to notify their people. The Indians gathered around the home bringing
articles of clothing to help the boy on his long journey to the Happy Hunting Grounds. Mrs. Tiffany
donated a straw tick and a pillow. The night before the boy died the Indians killed six horses, part
of which was roasted and part boiled. They ate the meat and placed the bones beside the dying
boy. When he breathed his last they took a gourd filled with water with which they rubbed the
entire body. He was then dressed in a white shirt, a pair of trousers and a beautifully colored silk
handkerchief covered his face. Bishop Tiffany conducted the funeral and the body was taken to
the burial ground were a six foot grave with a shelf dug out of its side was made ready. In this
niche or shelf the body was placed and covered with a blanket; they then drove wooden stakes
around the side of the grave, hung a canvas which had holes in it to fit the stakes so that no dirt
would get on the remains. Wheat, beans, corn, a rock with a hollow in it and another to grind the
grains were placed in the grave. Then the bedding, books, clothing, saddle, bridle and other gifts,
together with the bones of the dead horses, were placed lengthwise and the grave covered with
straw and dirt. The articles that could be hung were placed on the stakes. It was their belief
there was something in the body of the dead boy that would never die and the horses' bones
were left to carry him to the Happy Hunting Grounds. After attending the funeral and realizing
their beliefs in a hereafter, Sarah Jane was ready to teach Christianity to the Indians.

One other funeral at which Bishop Tiffany presided was that of an Indian who had been a Mormon
but later became interested in the Presbyterian Church. The father wanted his boy to have a
Latter-day Saint funeral, so the good bishop made a coffin and covered it with bleach, while his
wife aided by a Sister Savage made a white suit. It was dark when they had finished their job.
They had to cross the Salt River which was very dangerous at the height of the now rainy season.
The Bishop and Valenzula took the coffin in a high-seated wagon while the two women followed
in a buggy. The men crossed the river safely, but while the women were in midstream, the breast
strap of the harness became unbuckled and fell across the horse's feet hobbling her. After a few
frightening moments they reached the other side. It was nearly midnight when they arrived at the
dead boy's home. Mrs. Tiffany had taught the Indian choir and they were beautiful singers. As
they approached the home these four anxious people heard the choir singing "Oh, My Father."
The funeral was held at this late hour and day was breaking when they arrived home the next
morning.


Baptism: It was hard for the Indians to understand just what baptism meant. One time, when
Henry Rogers was president of this mission, he had the women make a number of white shirts as
there were many men and boys who had requested baptism. Several months later Mr. Rogers, Mr.
Tiffany and Valenzula were holding a meeting when the group of Indians asked to be rebaptized.
Mr. Rogers asked them why rebaptism? The answer-each wanted a new white shirt.

Marriage: The Maricopas had a peculiar way of marrying. The braves would go to the home of the
girl of their choice and sing continuously for three nights. If the maiden liked him she would invite
him to enter her dwelling. That action on her part constituted the marriage ceremony. Later they
were required to go through the same ceremony as did the white people and Bishop Tiffany
officiated at many of these marriages.

Clothing: Bishop and Mrs. Tiffany taught the Indians to dress much like the white people. He had
two linen coats and Sarah Jane unpicked them and cut out of the cloth a pattern for men's
trousers. The Indians brought their cloth to her and she cut out trousers and coats for them.

Houses: The dwellings of the Indians were similar to their wheat bins. They drove a pole in the
center of the dirt floor around which they drove other wooden stakes in the form of a circle.
Willows were then woven in and out of the stakes making a compact little dwelling. The roof was
slant type and there was a little oval shaped opening two or three feet high which served as the
door. It was necessary for adults to crawl on their knees to get into the house. In cold weather a
fire was built for warmth but all the cooking was done outside. Sheds were usually built of brush
which were covered with mud on the sides and roof.

Farms: The government allotted a specified amount of ground to each Indian family. They raised
their own wheat and cultivated the land similar to the white people. Some of the Indians had
oxen, others had horses. Homemade wooden plows were utilized and all the work of preparing
the land and planting the crops was done by the men; but when harvest time came the women
went into the fields with their hand-sickles and cut the heads of wheat as close as possible
leaving the stalks standing for later use as straw. The men then carried the baskets of wheat
heads to the threshing floor. This was a small piece of ground which had been tromped down as
hard and smooth as possible and in the center of which had been inserted a large pole. When the
wheat heads had been carefully placed around the pole three to six horses were driven around
and around until the wheat was tromped out. Sometimes it would take all day to accomplish this
task. When a breeze came up the men would take shovels full of grain and throw it into the air.
The wheat fell to the ground and the chaff blew away. It was then shoveled into sacks and taken
to the bins. The women picked up the grain left on the ground-not a kernel was wasted.

Food: The women did all the cooking. To make bread or tortillas, as they called them, they placed a flat tin over a fire where they mixed the flour and water into dough. When it was thoroughly kneaded they parted and flattened the dough until it was as thin as a wafer and then cooked it on the hot tin. Bread was made of a similar dough shaped into loaves and laid in the ashes. More ashes were placed on top and then a covering of live coals. One of their finest dishes was a sweet bread. There were many mesquite trees growing in the vicinity which bore long beans similar to our wax beans. These were gathered when ripe and ground into a fine flour. Water was mixed with the flour, kneaded and formed into loaves which were put in the sun to dry. It was very sweet and the Indians ate it as we eat candy. Very often there were rabbit hunts, and the rabbits were cooked over a fire on forked sticks. Coffee and meats were cooked in ollas which were vessels made of clay and burned to make them water-proof. The women carried water in ollas on their heads. The men rode horses and the women trotted along at the same pace as the horses. Drinks were made from the roots of century plants and also grapes. Sometimes the Indians became quite inebriated and rode from place to place yelling at the top of their voices.
-Almira T. Bethers
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Husband
George Tiffany Pedigree
Birth: 14 MAY 1807 Delhi, Delaware, New York
Christening:
Marriage: 1829 , , New York
Death: 21 JUN 1885 Provo, Utah, Utah
Burial: Provo, Utah, Utah
LDS Ordinances
[Endowment: Completed] : 03 FEB 1846
[Seal To Spouse: Completed] : 31 OCT 1872
Father: George Tiffany Family
Mother: Mary Mason

Wife
Almira Whipple Pedigree

Birth: 13 JUN 1810 Sanford, Broome, New York
Christening:
Marriage: 1829 , , New York
Death: 04 FEB 1889 Provo, Utah, Utah
Burial: Provo, Utah, Utah
LDS Ordinances
[Endowment: Completed] : 03 FEB 1846
[Seal To Spouse: Completed] : 31 OCT 1872
Father: Daniel Whipple Family
Mother: Mary Tiffany

Children
1. Cynthia Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: 02 FEB 1830 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: 06 OCT 1845 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Endowment: Completed] : 11 OCT 1905
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

2. Zenos Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 31 JUL 1831 Newfield, Tompkins, New York
Christening:
Death: DEC 1843 <Newfield, Tompkins, New York>
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : 18 FEB 1961
[Endowment: Completed] : 15 MAR 1961
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

3. Ira Patchen Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 14 FEB 1835 Eaton, , Lorain, Ohio
Christening:
Death: MAR 1905 <Eaton, , Lorain, Ohio>
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : JUL 1842
[Endowment: Completed] : 08 MAR 1867
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

4. Loyal Peck Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 27 JUL 1837 Littlefield, Modena, Stark, Illinois
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : 1846
[Endowment: Completed] : 26 JAN 1869
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

5. Mary Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: DEC 1844 Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois
Christening:
Death: 14 DEC 1845 <Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois>
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : CHILD
[Endowment: Completed] : CHILD
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

6. Almira Rebecca Tiffany Pedigree
Female
Birth: 18 AUG 1847 Garden Grove, Decatur, Iowa
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : 1855
[Endowment: Completed] : 25 FEB 1865
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

7. George Mason Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 31 JAN 1850 Springville, Pottawattamie, Iowa
Christening:
Death: 14 MAR 1909 <Springville, Pottawattamie, Iowa>
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : MAY 1858
[Endowment: Completed] : 26 JAN 1869
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE

8. Nelson Whipple Tiffany Pedigree
Male
Birth: 06 AUG 1852 Fort Larramie, , Goshen, Wyoming
Christening:
Death:
Burial:
LDS Ordinances
[Baptism: Completed] : 1860
[Endowment: Completed] : 11 DEC 1879
[Seal To Parent: Completed] : 26 FEB 1962 SLAKE
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