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Re: Twamley Family History
Posted by: Sherry Twamley (ID *****1550) Date: September 18, 2004 at 06:33:30
In Reply to: Twamley Family History by Glen Twamley of 13

Glen,

There is a medieval era genealogy link with the surname, Twamley (de Twamlowe; Lidulph DE TWAMLOWE [Lord]) at:

http://www.leftwich.org/family/I845.html
The Leftwich Historical Association, Inc.
PO Box 7053
Hampton, VA 23666-0053

The Twamley's ascended from William Malbank (born about 1086, died about 1109). Spelling variants: Malbon, Malbanc, Mallbone, Mallbank, Milbanks (Yorkshire), Milbanke (Baron Wentworth), Wychemalbank., Baron of Nantwich. William Malbank was made the Baron of Nantwich following the Norman conquest in 1066, and was holder of the village of Hatherton at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book in 1086. William MALBANK Baron Wich Malbank (Namptwich) r. Wich Malbank, Cheshire, Eng.

Families who provided assistance to William the Conqueror were allocated vast tracts of land; the Malbanks’ being most of South Cheshire, parts of North Wales and North Shropshire. The Falaise Roll carries 315 names of all the Noblemen who were involved with William.

A few of the many places named after Malbank include:
1. Nantwich Castle: Built by Malbank for his brother Piers about 1160 to 1170, as a look-out point and a defence against any Welsh attack from the west. In 1288, the castle was left by a different Wm. Malbank to his daughter, Philippa. She married and became the Countess of Warwick.
2. Wick Malbanc (Latin = Malbedeng; meaning 'of Wick Malbanc'), which is now Crewe & Nantwich Cheshire, confirmed by the Domesday book.
3. The opening page of the first commissioned parish register of Nantwich, begun in 1539, describes the book as representingm, “The pairyshe [the parish] of Wychemalbank ref: www.scfhs.org.uk/scfhs/articles/first_nantwich.html ).
4. The manor of Wich Malbank (Nantwich).
r. Nantwich, Cheshire, Eng.

Malbank was the younger son of the Brecy family from Brecy near Caen in Normandy. The remaining members of the Malbank family retained their original surname 'de-Brecy ((Braceio)', or translated, 'of Brecy', until they gained land or control elsewhere.
·The Malbanks of Cheshire married into the influential Vernon Family (of Haddon Hall) and who number among their descendants the de Stokeports (of Stockport) as well as the Wilbrahams and the Breretons.
·Malbanks had a grandson who left two heiresses, one of which married Richard de Vernon.
·“It seems probable that the surviving Malbon family later moved into the parish of Barthomley, situated on the border of Staffordshire, though still lying within the old hundred and deanery of "Namptwich" (Nantwich)... the parish contained five townships, Barthomley, Alsager, Barterley, Crewe, and Haslington...” (ref.: www.malbon.co.uk/malbonhistory.htm )

References: www.thisischeshire.co.uk/cheshire/crewe__nantwich/history/domesday.html
http://www.malbon.co.uk/malbonhistory.htm

“Domesday Book
In the years after the Norman Conquest in 1066, the county of Cheshire was an important defensive centre for William I, as the main gateway to the North West. Despite its importance in the defence against incursions by the Welsh and the Irish, William had little or no land under his direct control in the county, suggesting that he placed a lot of trust in Earl Hugh Lopus of Chester, his most powerful lord and tenant-in-chief in the area.
Crewe, then called Coppenhall, was held by William Mallbank, the powerful baron of Nantwich, who was tenant-in-chief for many lordships in the county of Cheshire. Mallbank was a younger son of the Brecy family from Brecy, near Caen in Normandy. The knight's fees of Crewe were held by Richard de Vernon, another very powerful man in Cheshire, who held many other knight's fees as well as Crewe's. Knight's fees are the dues paid to the overlord on the event of a vassal's (subordinate of humble origin) death, to be paid by the deceased vassal's heir.”









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